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Re: [midatlanticretro] Important museum update

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  • Jim Scheef
    Evan, This is great. I can t believe we ll have a museum room by fall! Jim ... From: Evan Koblentz To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com Sent:
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 5, 2007
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      Evan,

      This is great. I can't believe we'll have a museum room by fall!

      Jim

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, August 5, 2007 8:02:02 PM
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] Important museum update

      Hi all,

       

      Today was an ordinary day at InfoAge – our room had about 15 visitors during the three public “open” hours – but they’ve been staying in the room for longer and longer each week, since ours has an air conditioner that works very well. J  Captive audience!!  We’ve also had many visitors who say, “I was at / I heard about your show in June and wanted to see more.”

       

      Yesterday, Joe and I spent several hours scraping FOUR layers of paint off the metal doorframes in the entrance area to our future museum rooms.  We removed the vast majority of the peeling paint, but there’s a LOT of non-peeling paint still there.  It seems to be a really massive challenge, time-wise, to remove all of that old paint.  We considered using a belt sander (while we’d wear respirators), and/or using an industrial solvent of some kind, but I spoke with Fred yesterday and again today, and he said “no way” to those ideas.  He assures me that new paint designed to adhere to metal, i.e. Rustoleum, while work a lot better than I expect.  And he says that choosing the right color, such as dark green or blue, will cover up most of the bumpy areas where old paint is still underneath.  So I’m trusting his experience on this matter.  Just have to remove a little bit more of the peeling stuff, and then we’ll apply new paint to that area.  Some of the paint on the adjacent sheetrock is also peeling, but there it’s more likely that Fred or Steve will just put in new sheetrock.  When this job (which really isn’t as big as I’m making it sound) is done, then we will have a clean enough entrance to our museum rooms.

       

      Meanwhile, to prepare the actual rooms: for those who don’t recall or never visited, we have four rooms.  Three are about the size of an ordinary office, and one is double-sized.  The double-sized room is closest to the entranceway and we already have a piece of carpet for it; just have to lay that carpet down.  What we’ll do with computer gear currently in that large room is disperse it into the smaller rooms, and also move some of it (the smaller, random stuff) into our basement storage area.  Then we’ll put down the carpet (which will be easy) and be able to start making exhibits!  I believe we’re just two more solid workdays away from being in that position.

       

      This part is open for debate, but I believe our first three exhibits should be: 1., Computing at Camp Evans / Computing in the Military (parts of computer history with direct ties to what happened in these hallways – there is a nice list); 2., Computers of the Region (literally, an exhibit of interesting computers made by companies around these parts, from – I guess – Boston to Pittsburgh to DC); 3., 70s/80s personal computers (since those are easiest to exhibit and will most likely resonate with our visitors.)

       

      And so, our next official workday (plenty of notice this time!!) will be Saturday, August 25, 10:30am until whenever, although I’ll continue working on these things a little at a time until then.

       

      That’s all for now.  I feel a HUGE sense of community accomplishment, now that we can see the light at the end of the tunnel.  Comments / questions are highly encouraged.  (For the 19 millionth time: this is YOUR club, not mine.)

       

      - Evan


    • William Donzelli
      ... Wuss. Let me know whenyou have to deal with paint that comes in eight inch incements. ... The best way to remove paint, in my opinion, is still an old
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 5, 2007
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        > Yesterday, Joe and I spent several hours scraping FOUR layers of paint off the
        > metal doorframes in the entrance area to our future museum rooms.

        Wuss. Let me know whenyou have to deal with paint that comes in eight
        inch incements.

        > We considered using a belt sander (while we'd wear respirators), and/or using an
        > industrial solvent of some kind, but I spoke with Fred yesterday and again today,
        > and he said "no way" to those ideas. He assures me that new paint designed to
        > adhere to metal, i.e. Rustoleum, while work a lot better than I expect. And he says
        > that choosing the right color, such as dark green or blue, will cover up most of the
        > bumpy areas where old paint is still underneath.

        The best way to remove paint, in my opinion, is still an old triangle
        shaped chipper (other shapes are available), or the "green"
        environmentally freindly goops. Stay away from the nasty petrochemical
        things of old - they work, but leave such a mess, and you slowly die..
        When you have a lot of time (a couple of days) and large flat expanses
        (like on a door), the green goop is pretty great.

        I am currently (always?) restoring a house from 1776, with my cousin
        (half owner of the house) being a classcially trained archiologist
        often looking over my shoulder, so I get to do a LOT of very proper
        paint removal.

        A standard chipper, with a *light* touch, can do wonders. Make sure
        the blades are SHARP. Yes, there will be some damage to the wood, but
        nothing a little steam or filler can not fix. And with metal? No big
        deal, unless you are Hercules. When you strip, you MUST strip it all.
        Modern paints WILL NOT hide half stripped areas. Nothing will. If you
        chip, be prepared to chip it ALL, or be skilled at filling and sanding
        the transition zone, so the differences in the paint will be hidden.

        Dark colors are better than light colors for hiding flaws, but better
        yet is the lustre of the paint - the flatter the paint is, the more
        sins are hidden. Unfortuneately, flat paints tend to look bad on
        moulding and doorframes, so pick something middle of the road -
        semi-gloss.

        I am still a fan (and user) of oil paints (like Rustoleum), but unless
        you realy know what you are doing, stick to latex. Good latex, as in
        Baer or Benjamin Moore. WIth paint, you get what you pay for. And if
        you must ue oils, used a Benjamin Moore oil. A few places will still
        color match oils.

        The choice is yours when it comes to painting. If you do a quick job,
        you will need to do a quick repaint later. Do a very careful complete
        job, and you can ignore it for years.

        --
        Will
      • Evan Koblentz
        ... Will, thanks for all this good advice. I suspect that InfoAge s tool edges are dull and haven t been replaced in eons. Maybe I ll try again with some new
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 5, 2007
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          >>> The best way to remove paint, in my opinion

          Will, thanks for all this good advice. I suspect that InfoAge's tool
          edges are dull and haven't been replaced in eons. Maybe I'll try again
          with some new blades.

          Or you could come visit and be as helpful as you were at VCF. :)

          - Evan
        • Dan Roganti
          You van try using a Heatgun (not a hairdryer) it s not as lethal as a blowtorch, but still effective. It ll make the paint layers bubble up so you can scrape
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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            You van try using a Heatgun (not a hairdryer) it's not as lethal as a blowtorch, but still effective. It'll make the paint layers bubble up so you can scrape it off with a putty knife.

            =Dan

            Evan Koblentz wrote:


             

            Yesterday, Joe and I spent several hours scraping FOUR layers of paint off the metal doorframes in the entrance area to our future museum rooms.  We removed the vast majority of the peeling paint, but there’s a LOT of non-peeling paint still there.  It seems to be a really massive challenge, time-wise, to remove all of that old paint.

            
              
          • William Donzelli
            ... If the metal doorframes come anywhere near contact with wood, even studs inside the walls, using a heat gun is ABSOLUTELY NOT RECOMMENDED. The risk for
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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              > You van try using a Heatgun (not a hairdryer) it's not as lethal as a blowtorch, but still effective. It'll make the paint layers bubble up so you can scrape it off with a putty knife.

              If the metal doorframes come anywhere near contact with wood, even
              studs inside the walls, using a heat gun is ABSOLUTELY NOT
              RECOMMENDED. The risk for fire is very large. If the metal doorframes
              ONLY touch masonry, you can use a heat gun.

              Heatguns are OK on wood, of course.

              --
              Will
            • Dan Roganti
              In any event, you might have to resort to just painting over to avoid any EPA issues regarding paint removal/fumes on an old gov t/state installation since
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                In any event, you might have to resort to just painting over to avoid any EPA issues regarding paint removal/fumes on an old gov't/state installation since there's most likely lead in that paint--in some or all the layers--there's strict guidelines for lead paint removal. Something Fred probably didnt want to elaborate to avoid giving you any more headaches :)

                A blowtorch, as suggested previously, has a much higher temp than a heatgun, >1000F
                At least with a heatgun, you can use the low setting , usually 700/800F
                Even a heatgun can cause burn spots in wood if not used correctly.
                In combination with the large surface area of the sheet metal doorframe creates a heatsink which disperses the heat.
                An old trick I always do on a window pane is to cover the window glass with sheet metal to protect it from cracking under the heat when removing old paint.

                =Dan


                William Donzelli wrote:

                > You van try using a Heatgun (not a hairdryer) it's not as lethal as a blowtorch, but still effective. It'll make the paint layers bubble up so you can scrape it off with a putty knife.

                If the metal doorframes come anywhere near contact with wood, even
                studs inside the walls, using a heat gun is ABSOLUTELY NOT
                RECOMMENDED. The risk for fire is very large. If the metal doorframes
                ONLY touch masonry, you can use a heat gun.

                Heatguns are OK on wood, of course.

                --
                Will


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              • Sridhar Ayengar
                ... I ve done a fair amount of work restoring old wooden fireplace mantles. I ve found that there are quite a few solvents out there that work just as well as
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                  Dan Roganti wrote:
                  > A blowtorch, as suggested previously, has a much higher temp than a
                  > heatgun, >1000F
                  > At least with a heatgun, you can use the low setting , usually 700/800F
                  > Even a heatgun can cause burn spots in wood if not used correctly.
                  > In combination with the large surface area of the sheet metal doorframe
                  > creates a heatsink which disperses the heat.
                  > An old trick I always do on a window pane is to cover the window glass
                  > with sheet metal to protect it from cracking under the heat when
                  > removing old paint.

                  I've done a fair amount of work restoring old wooden fireplace mantles.
                  I've found that there are quite a few solvents out there that work
                  just as well as heat, but are much more gentle. Just read some of the
                  reviews.

                  Peace... Sridhar
                • William Donzelli
                  ... Really, using a heatgun on a metal doorframe with contact to wood within the wall is REALLY DANGEROUS. Yes, the metal sinks the heat. Where? Unless you rip
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                    > A blowtorch, as suggested previously, has a much higher temp than a heatgun, >1000F
                    > At least with a heatgun, you can use the low setting , usually 700/800F
                    > Even a heatgun can cause burn spots in wood if not used correctly.
                    > In combination with the large surface area of the sheet metal doorframe creates a heatsink which disperses the heat.

                    Really, using a heatgun on a metal doorframe with contact to wood
                    within the wall is REALLY DANGEROUS. Yes, the metal sinks the heat.
                    Where? Unless you rip the wall open, you do not know. It might sink it
                    to a select few places with dry old wood, or some of the awful
                    flammable junk that used to pass for insulation. The thermal
                    resistance of a metal to wood joint is much lower that that of the
                    hot-air to wood (or hot-air to metal, for that matter). It is easy to
                    get carried away with a hot-air gun (the temperature controls on those
                    things are not precise, as well), and you really might not know about
                    charring wood within the wall until too late.

                    As for stripping around glass on a window? Remove the glass. The putty
                    holding the pane is probably in need a replacement anyway.

                    --
                    Will
                  • Evan Koblentz
                    Heh ... you guys make a good point ... Don t burn down the museum. :)
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 6, 2007
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                      Heh ... you guys make a good point ... "Don't burn down the museum." :)


                      >> A blowtorch, as suggested previously, has a much higher temp than a
                      >> heatgun, >1000F
                      >> At least with a heatgun, you can use the low setting , usually 700/800F
                      >> Even a heatgun can cause burn spots in wood if not used correctly.
                      >> In combination with the large surface area of the sheet metal doorframe
                      >> creates a heatsink which disperses the heat.
                      >
                      > Really, using a heatgun on a metal doorframe with contact to wood
                      > within the wall is REALLY DANGEROUS. Yes, the metal sinks the heat.
                      > Where? Unless you rip the wall open, you do not know. It might sink it
                      > to a select few places with dry old wood, or some of the awful
                      > flammable junk that used to pass for insulation. The thermal
                      > resistance of a metal to wood joint is much lower that that of the
                      > hot-air to wood (or hot-air to metal, for that matter). It is easy to
                      > get carried away with a hot-air gun (the temperature controls on those
                      > things are not precise, as well), and you really might not know about
                      > charring wood within the wall until too late.
                      >
                      > As for stripping around glass on a window? Remove the glass. The putty
                      > holding the pane is probably in need a replacement anyway.
                      >
                      > --
                      > Will
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                    • Evan Koblentz
                      Jeff J., Corey, and myself all did some museum work this week. We found some bad news, water-wise, about our warehouse area. Most important thing first:
                      Message 10 of 12 , Dec 11, 2013
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                        Jeff J., Corey, and myself all did some museum work this week. We found
                        some bad news, water-wise, about our warehouse area.

                        Most important thing first: nothing is damaged. A few boxes are slightly
                        wet, etc., but that's all.

                        What happened is the outside roof tarp gave way in the last storm. In
                        response to that, Jeff J. and I last week bought several smaller indoor
                        tarps to cover the vast majority of our equipment. We considered this
                        precautionary, because other than one specific corner, there aren't any
                        significant leaks on the half of the building where our storage resides.
                        All of the bad leaks are across the hall, which is mostly empty space
                        right now. Those are VERY bad, but they aren't impacting our collection.

                        The new tarps worked -- sort of. Rather than divert any water around our
                        shelving units and onto the floor, they "caught" water in some puddles
                        atop the tarps.

                        Jeff was there again this past Sunday and did what he could (he was
                        working alone) to tip that water off the tarps and onto the floor, which
                        is safer than it appears, because the shelving units are all several
                        inches off the floor due to their wheels/legs. Corey and I did another
                        round of that today.

                        The latest weather report calls for light snow on Saturday and rain on
                        Sunday. Corey volunteered to go to the museum at least once a week, for
                        the next couple of months, to continue the process if necessary.

                        I went to talk to Fred about all of this. He had mixed news for us.

                        The town council was supposed to discuss the roof bid/contract at their
                        meeting tonight. Now they aren't. Apparently they have 175K put aside
                        for the roofs (our section and six others), but the work estimate
                        increased into the 200s, so they're trying to find money for it. Fred
                        asked the town officials, "Why can't you just do what you can now [such
                        as MARCH's section -EK] and finish the rest later?" ... he's waiting for
                        an answer.

                        However, Fred also said he's ready and able to spend some InfoAge money
                        on new outdoor tarps for our building -- better ones than the previous
                        outdoor tarps -- and he's trying to make arrangements with the
                        contractor that does this work.

                        I'm trying to find out how much the better outdoor tarps cost. Maybe
                        MARCH could help InfoAge pay for it. Money tends to grease the wheels.

                        So, when some of you visit our storage area during Festivus (we'll do an
                        organized trip across campus), please "don't panic" as stated on the
                        cover of HHGG. It might look bad inside: giant leaks/puddles on the
                        empty side and possibly some small rivers between the aisles among our
                        shelving units. * We * put those rivers there ... it stinks, but it's
                        better than having the water atop our collection.

                        Given the cold, and the vast size of the building, there's no point in
                        running a small dehumidifier.

                        We always said that our collection, while in a building without HVAC, at
                        least had a solid roof, security, and a concrete floor. Right now we
                        really only have 2 of those 3 things. Our roof is in bad shape. The town
                        has the money earmarked to fix it but they're moving crazy slow.

                        Fred suggested that as an extra precaution we might be able to hang some
                        of the indoor tarps at an angle, rather than just laying them across the
                        top of the shelves, so they automatically divert water onto the floor. I
                        don't know if that will work because we have a lot of equipment in the room.

                        One half of our current half of the building has no leaks at all. We
                        just might stuff everything onto that side, temporarily, until there's a
                        better outer tarp and/or until the roof is fixed. I hope to avoid that
                        step because it would be massively inconvenient (we wouldn't be able to
                        get to anything) .... holding off on a decision for now.

                        There is also some unrelated good news.

                        - I heard back from "The Americans" prop folks. They're probably going
                        to do another rental from us after the new year.

                        - In the museum, Corey hung up a very nice (and extremely funny!) framed
                        puzzle of a cartoon computer that I built with my girlfriend, after Jeff
                        J. and I found it during a rescue mission several months ago. The puzzle
                        is colorful and looks great on our wall. Here it is a few months ago
                        before I framed it: http://snarc.net/puzzle.jpg and here it is now
                        hanging in the museum next to our IBM 1130: http://snarc.net/puzzle2.jpg.

                        - Corey and I also moved some clutter out of the way in the building
                        9059 event room where Festivus will be held. In addition, Corey dropped
                        off his own projecter; an Apple II+ loaded with games on a CF card; and
                        some adult beverages.

                        - InfoAge carpeted our museum hallway a few weeks ago. Much nicer than
                        hideous old tile! I would have preferred new clean tile, but it's still
                        an upgrade. Today I vacuumed the hallway and all four of our exhibit rooms.
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