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  • us21090
    Hi Evan et al, I heard of MARCH back in the pre-MARCH days of the Classic Computer group when Evan first came up with the idea (January 05). I ve delayed
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 17 10:05 PM
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      Hi Evan et al,

      I heard of MARCH back in the pre-MARCH days of the Classic Computer
      group when Evan first came up with the idea (January '05).

      I've delayed joining because I'm not a heavy collector. I don't have
      much to bring to TCF or to swap.

      But all pshaw-ing aside, I do have a KIM-1 single-board computer that
      I'm pleased to still have (my childhood Digi-Comp 1, Think-a-Dot and
      GENIAC were victims of house cleaning!). The site
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1 has a nice page on this computer.
      In short, it was an in-expensive single-board computer system
      developed by MOS to show off the capabilities of their new CPU, the
      6502 (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technologies_6502 ). It
      was wildly popular (to the chagrin of Intel and Motorola) and lead to
      the choice for CPUs in the Apple ][, Commodore, Atari, NES and others.
      Cool to have the system. Nope-- not for swap, trade or for sale.

      But I haven't powered it up in years (decades?). I'm busy this time
      of year, but if I can get some time I'd love to get it working and
      come to TCF.

      I also have a HP-25 LED RPM calculator (with rebuilt battery pack). I
      put in a lot of hours programming that thing (with only room for 49
      steps!). I had it calculating divisions with infinite precision (yes,
      its true!). On the other end of the scale, it could calculate powers
      of 2 over 50 digits long (I forget, maybe that was infinite, too).
      Geeky yes, but fun.

      Sorry to go on so much. Evan-- I'll let you know whether the KIM-1
      and I will be ready for TCF.

      Scott Austin

      P.S. One of the fun obligations I have this time of year is helping
      organize the 5th Annual Robot Fest near BWI Airport in Maryland.
      BTW, it's hosted at the Historical Electronics Museum. See
      http://www.robotfest.com for info on both.
    • evan
      Hi Scott, thanks for joining us. The group s looking pretty solid and our TCF exhibit will be awesome. After that we will start to plan some other events.
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 17 10:10 PM
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        Hi Scott, thanks for joining us. The group's looking pretty solid and our TCF
        exhibit will be awesome. After that we will start to plan some other events.

        --- us21090 <us21090@...> wrote:

        >
        > Hi Evan et al,
        >
        > I heard of MARCH back in the pre-MARCH days of the Classic Computer
        > group when Evan first came up with the idea (January '05).
        >
        > I've delayed joining because I'm not a heavy collector. I don't have
        > much to bring to TCF or to swap.
        >
        > But all pshaw-ing aside, I do have a KIM-1 single-board computer that
        > I'm pleased to still have (my childhood Digi-Comp 1, Think-a-Dot and
        > GENIAC were victims of house cleaning!). The site
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1 has a nice page on this computer.
        > In short, it was an in-expensive single-board computer system
        > developed by MOS to show off the capabilities of their new CPU, the
        > 6502 (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technologies_6502 ). It
        > was wildly popular (to the chagrin of Intel and Motorola) and lead to
        > the choice for CPUs in the Apple ][, Commodore, Atari, NES and others.
        > Cool to have the system. Nope-- not for swap, trade or for sale.
        >
        > But I haven't powered it up in years (decades?). I'm busy this time
        > of year, but if I can get some time I'd love to get it working and
        > come to TCF.
        >
        > I also have a HP-25 LED RPM calculator (with rebuilt battery pack). I
        > put in a lot of hours programming that thing (with only room for 49
        > steps!). I had it calculating divisions with infinite precision (yes,
        > its true!). On the other end of the scale, it could calculate powers
        > of 2 over 50 digits long (I forget, maybe that was infinite, too).
        > Geeky yes, but fun.
        >
        > Sorry to go on so much. Evan-- I'll let you know whether the KIM-1
        > and I will be ready for TCF.
        >
        > Scott Austin
        >
        > P.S. One of the fun obligations I have this time of year is helping
        > organize the 5th Annual Robot Fest near BWI Airport in Maryland.
        > BTW, it's hosted at the Historical Electronics Museum. See
        > http://www.robotfest.com for info on both.
        >
        >
        >
        >


        =====
        Evan's personal homepage: www.snarc.net

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      • billdeg@aol.com
        what you don t have in quantity you have in quality...what REV (revision) is the KIM? I have an expansion board for a newer KIM, but I am not sure what REV
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 18 9:20 AM
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          what you don't have in quantity you have in quality...what REV (revision) is the KIM?  I have an expansion board for a newer KIM, but I am not sure what REV it's for exactly.  It's blue if that helps.  There are ports for s-100 bus and cassette and ??...Let me know if you'd like me to bring the board.
           
          I have a working REV G Kim
           
          I am bringing a complete VIC-20 setup as my contribution to the TCF.  A newer 6502.
           
          Bill Degnan
          vintagecomputer.net
           
          In a message dated 2/18/2005 1:06:59 AM Eastern Standard Time, us21090@... writes:
          But all pshaw-ing aside, I do have a KIM-1 single-board computer that
          I'm pleased to still have (my childhood Digi-Comp 1, Think-a-Dot and
          GENIAC were victims of house cleaning!).  The site
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1 has a nice page on this computer.
          In short, it was an in-expensive single-board computer system
          developed by MOS to show off the capabilities of their new CPU, the
          6502 (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technologies_6502 ).   It
          was wildly popular (to the chagrin of Intel and Motorola) and lead to
          the choice for CPUs in the Apple ][, Commodore, Atari, NES and others.
          Cool to have the system.  Nope-- not for swap, trade or for sale.

          But I haven't powered it up in years (decades?).  I'm busy this time
          of year, but if I can get some time I'd love to get it working and
          come to TCF. 
           
        • rarecoinbuyer
          ... I ve been looking for an original MOS KIM-1 recently but prices have gone through the roof. I consistently get bid beyond budget. I wish I had an interest
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 18 10:27 AM
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            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "us21090" <us21090@...> wrote:
            >
            > I do have a KIM-1 single-board computer that
            > I'm pleased to still have (my childhood Digi-Comp 1, Think-a-Dot and
            > GENIAC were victims of house cleaning!). The site
            > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1 has a nice page on this computer.
            > In short, it was an in-expensive single-board computer system
            > developed by MOS to show off the capabilities of their new CPU, the
            > 6502 (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technologies_6502 ). It
            > was wildly popular (to the chagrin of Intel and Motorola) and lead to
            > the choice for CPUs in the Apple ][, Commodore, Atari, NES and others.
            > Cool to have the system. Nope-- not for swap, trade or for sale.
            >

            I've been looking for an original MOS KIM-1 recently but prices have gone through the roof. I consistently get bid beyond budget. I wish I had an interest back in the 1990s when you could pick them up for song.

            I hope this is not retro off topic, but what do you think of the microKIM kit that is available today? I think it would make a decent "hole filler" until I can afford a real KIM-1.
          • Bob Applegate
            ... This depends on what you want a KIM for. If you want a genuine KIM-1, then this won t do, but if you want to run KIM software and see what it was like in
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 18 10:46 AM
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              On Feb 18, 2012, at 1:27 PM, rarecoinbuyer wrote:

              I've been looking for an original MOS KIM-1 recently but prices have gone through the roof. I consistently get bid beyond budget. I wish I had an interest back in the 1990s when you could pick them up for song.

              I hope this is not retro off topic, but what do you think of the microKIM kit that is available today? I think it would make a decent "hole filler" until I can afford a real KIM-1.


              This depends on what you want a KIM for.  If you want a genuine KIM-1, then this won't do, but if you want to run KIM software and see what it was like in the early days of home computers, then the microKIM is perfect.  It's also safer to play with since parts are readily available.

              Bob


            • rarecoinbuyer
              That makes sense. I am familiar with the philosophy. In rare coin collecting, it s always better to have an original worn out flat cull example of the date as
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 18 11:05 AM
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                That makes sense. I am familiar with the philosophy. In rare coin collecting, it's always better to have an original worn out flat cull example of the date as a hole filler than any replica.

                However, as you mention, it would be fun to program and experiment with. And I could use the practice soldering. Probably not a bad purchase for $99. Thank you.

                --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "rarecoinbuyer" <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "us21090" <us21090@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I do have a KIM-1 single-board computer that
                > > I'm pleased to still have (my childhood Digi-Comp 1, Think-a-Dot and
                > > GENIAC were victims of house cleaning!). The site
                > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1 has a nice page on this computer.
                > > In short, it was an in-expensive single-board computer system
                > > developed by MOS to show off the capabilities of their new CPU, the
                > > 6502 (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technologies_6502 ). It
                > > was wildly popular (to the chagrin of Intel and Motorola) and lead to
                > > the choice for CPUs in the Apple ][, Commodore, Atari, NES and others.
                > > Cool to have the system. Nope-- not for swap, trade or for sale.
                > >
                >
                > I've been looking for an original MOS KIM-1 recently but prices have gone through the roof. I consistently get bid beyond budget. I wish I had an interest back in the 1990s when you could pick them up for song.
                >
                > I hope this is not retro off topic, but what do you think of the microKIM kit that is available today? I think it would make a decent "hole filler" until I can afford a real KIM-1.
                >
              • Systems Glitch
                Unfortunately, I ended up selling my last Rev 0 KIM-1 to pay the bills while trying to find a job. One of the things that made it easier to let go of was
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 19 7:33 AM
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                  Unfortunately, I ended up selling my last Rev 0 KIM-1 to pay the bills while trying to find a job. One of the things that made it easier to let go of was knowing that I could buy a well-designed microKIM kit for less than a fifth of what original MOS KIM-1s were going for at the time. Plus, I'd get to build another kit!

                  Previous replies are definitely correct in that it's safer to experiment with the microKIM, especially if you're going to attach things to the KIM-1's output port(s). The original used mask-programmed 6530s, which included part of the KIM monitor as well as the I/O ports. Blowing an I/O port means you need to find a preprogrammed 6530 from another KIM-1, or live with that I/O bit dead (assuming you haven't blown out other 6530 functions).

                  Thanks,
                  Jonathan

                  On Sat, 18 Feb 2012 19:05:57 -0000
                  "rarecoinbuyer" <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:

                  > That makes sense. I am familiar with the philosophy. In rare coin collecting, it's always better to have an original worn out flat cull example of the date as a hole filler than any replica.
                  >
                  > However, as you mention, it would be fun to program and experiment with. And I could use the practice soldering. Probably not a bad purchase for $99. Thank you.
                  >
                  > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "rarecoinbuyer" <rarecoinbuyer@...> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "us21090" <us21090@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > I do have a KIM-1 single-board computer that
                  > > > I'm pleased to still have (my childhood Digi-Comp 1, Think-a-Dot and
                  > > > GENIAC were victims of house cleaning!). The site
                  > > > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1 has a nice page on this computer.
                  > > > In short, it was an in-expensive single-board computer system
                  > > > developed by MOS to show off the capabilities of their new CPU, the
                  > > > 6502 (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOS_Technologies_6502 ). It
                  > > > was wildly popular (to the chagrin of Intel and Motorola) and lead to
                  > > > the choice for CPUs in the Apple ][, Commodore, Atari, NES and others.
                  > > > Cool to have the system. Nope-- not for swap, trade or for sale.
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > > I've been looking for an original MOS KIM-1 recently but prices have gone through the roof. I consistently get bid beyond budget. I wish I had an interest back in the 1990s when you could pick them up for song.
                  > >
                  > > I hope this is not retro off topic, but what do you think of the microKIM kit that is available today? I think it would make a decent "hole filler" until I can afford a real KIM-1.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Bob Applegate
                  ... That s exactly my problem. One of my KIMs has one dead pin of a 6530, so the display and keyboard don t work. I ve been looking for a semi-working, or
                  Message 8 of 11 , Feb 19 9:36 AM
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                    On Feb 19, 2012, at 10:33 AM, Systems Glitch wrote:

                     

                    Previous replies are definitely correct in that it's safer to experiment with the microKIM, especially if you're going to attach things to the KIM-1's output port(s). The original used mask-programmed 6530s, which included part of the KIM monitor as well as the I/O ports. Blowing an I/O port means you need to find a preprogrammed 6530 from another KIM-1, or live with that I/O bit dead (assuming you haven't blown out other 6530 functions).

                    That's exactly my problem.  One of my KIMs has one dead pin of a 6530, so the display and keyboard don't work.  I've been looking for a semi-working, or even dead, KIM and hope that the one chip I need is still working.  Fortunately I have another KIM working :)

                    Bob

                  • criticalweld1
                    Hello, I m new to the group, have a love of 70 s and 80 s computers, and want to help out at the workshop. I attended the last VCF and was so excited to find
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 10, 2014
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                      Hello,I'm new to the group, have a love of 70's and 80's computers, and want to help out at the workshop. I attended the last VCF and was so excited to find out that there is a local group of other people that really appreciate vintage computers!I am by no means a programmer or technician by trade. I do have enough of a working knowledge to share the computers of my childhood with my kids (3 and 5 yrs old) and help out anyone at the workshop that could use a "helper" :-)What time are you guys meeting up on Saturday?Thanks,Alex Duboski Clementon, NJ criticalweld@... (607)229-8943
                    • Evan Koblentz
                      ... Welcome. ... How did you hear about it? ... See next email....
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 10, 2014
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                        >> Hello, I'm new to the group

                        Welcome.

                        >> I attended the last VCF

                        How did you hear about it?

                        >> What time are you guys meeting up on Saturday?

                        See next email....
                      • criticalweld1
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jun 10, 2014
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                          >> I attended the last VCF>> How did you hear about it?
                          Being a ham (KB2YEF) and searching for hamfests to go to, I just googled "vintage computer show NJ" and you guys popped up!-Alex
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