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RE: [midatlanticretro] 8" Floppy diskettes conversion.

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  • Evan Koblentz
    Your best bet is to post on the cctalk mailing list. You can sign up at www.classiccmp.org. - Evan ... From: across_europe [mailto:across_europe@yahoo.com]
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 25, 2007
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      Your best bet is to post on the cctalk mailing list. You can sign up at
      www.classiccmp.org.

      - Evan

      -----Original Message-----
      From: across_europe [mailto:across_europe@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2007 5:54 PM
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] 8" Floppy diskettes conversion.

      Hello all,
      I appreciate any help that you may be able to provide ahead of time.
      I am working on preserving and converting some 8" IBM diskettes (part #
      2305830, Record lenght 128 bytes) to a modern format. I am new to this and
      would really appriciate any ideas on where to start.
      I live in Sacramento, CA and am hoping someone knows of a reliable source
      for a old drive that can read these disks. I dont currently know what
      system the data was written in. Also, could someone point me in the
      direction of the best way to convert this data to some optical media.
      Thanks for everything - G. Parisi




      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • Jim Scheef
      G, ... I am working on preserving and converting some 8 IBM diskettes Does this mean that you want to preserve the exact format of these floppies (sector by
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 26, 2007
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        G,

        >>
        I am working on preserving and converting some 8" IBM diskettes

        Does this mean that you want to preserve the exact format of these floppies (sector by sector) or is only the information important? What is on the floppies? programs? text files? data in some proprietary format? Since you do not know what original machine wrote the files, the IBM label may have no bearing on how to read them. There are data conversion/recovery services that will attempt to read and recover the information on the floppies for a fee. Searching on 'data conversion services' in Yahoo returned thousands of items some of which were actual companies offering such a service.

        >>could someone point me in the direction of the best way to convert this data to some optical media

        Once you have the files on a modern machine, burning them to a CD is trivial using the tools on just about any PC.

        Jim

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: across_europe <across_europe@...>
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Wednesday, April 25, 2007 6:53:53 PM
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] 8" Floppy diskettes conversion.

        Hello all,
        I appreciate any help that you may be able to provide ahead of time.
        I am working on preserving and converting some 8" IBM diskettes
        (part # 2305830, Record lenght 128 bytes) to a modern format. I am
        new to this and would really appriciate any ideas on where to start.
        I live in Sacramento, CA and am hoping someone knows of a reliable
        source for a old drive that can read these disks. I dont currently
        know what system the data was written in. Also, could someone point
        me in the direction of the best way to convert this data to some
        optical media. Thanks for everything - G. Parisi


      • Herb Johnson
        ... The short answer is that most likely, you ll have to pay a commercial company to do this for you, if they can. You ve provided so little information that
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 26, 2007
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          "across_europe" <across_europe@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello all,
          > I appreciate any help that you may be able to provide ahead of time.
          > I am working on preserving and converting some 8" IBM diskettes
          > (part # 2305830, Record lenght 128 bytes) to a modern format. I am
          > new to this and would really appriciate any ideas on where to start.
          > I live in Sacramento, CA and am hoping someone knows of a reliable
          > source for a old drive that can read these disks. I dont currently
          > know what system the data was written in. Also, could someone point
          > me in the direction of the best way to convert this data to some
          > optical media. Thanks for everything - G. Parisi

          The short answer is that most likely, you'll have to pay a commercial
          company to do this for you, if they can. You've provided so little
          information that anyone who COULD help you from their own, personal or
          hobbyist resources, would not know enough to offer to do so. More
          information equals more help.

          Jim Scheef mentioned the basic issues. To get help, you have to
          identify the SPECIFIC COMPUTER system these came from; and what
          operating system it was running. You might need even more information
          about that prior system, including what software and hardware was used
          to write those files. Any information you have at all will be helpful:
          as it stands now with what you've said, you are in a very difficult
          situation, which would require an experienced technician with access
          to 8-inch drives and old-school experience to resolve for you.

          In any event, buying an 8-inch drive will do you no good, most likely.
          There is currently no simple, plug-in-and-go, hardware and software
          system you can plug into a Windows PC to either connect to an 8-inch
          floppy, or to read whatever is on that floppy. (The 8-inch floppy
          drive won't "plug in" into your Windows PC.) There are some partial
          solutions, which informed technical people can use to make it work.

          Bottom line: 1) You'd have to get "lucky" to find a technical person
          who has this capability AND who would help you for modest cost. 2)
          Otherwise, as Jim says, there are commercial companies which do this
          for rather expensive fees (if your interest is only personal). In
          either case, the more information you can gather about the history of
          these disks, the better for you.

          I've been selling 8-inch floppy drives, and documentation on them, for
          decades. I see this question all the time. Check my Web site for some
          discussion and some Web links. But mostly those links are for
          technically oriented people.

          http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/s100faq.html#TEN

          http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/s_drives.html

          http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/s_point.html#disks

          My Web site is under some revision, so this information is rather
          spread out. I'll fix that but not today. Thanks for your question!

          Herb Johnson

          Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
          <a href="http://www.retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/"> web site</a>
          <a href="http://www.retrotechnology.net/herbs_stuff/"> domain mirror</a>
          my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
          if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
          "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
          S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"
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