Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [midatlanticretro] recycling how do/getting rid of junk/electronics recycling

Expand Messages
  • Jim Scheef
    Bill, Like Evan implied, recycling is the antithesis of collecting. Even so, my first thought was how could MARCH put this to use. Right now the absolute last
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 14, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Bill,

      Like Evan implied, recycling is the antithesis of collecting. Even so, my first thought was how could MARCH put this to use. Right now the absolute last thing we need at InfoAge would be several boxes of stuff *intended* for the scrap dealer. Your approach is very illuminating. Personally I don't see enough of this stuff to make it worthwhile, however, like you said, when combined with a few other people's junk, it could work.

      OTOH, I hate to think of how many 20-30M hard drives you recycled years ago in one 200lb load that could now be used to make our early microcomputers operational again. What was once junk is now oh so collectible! Oh well...

      Jim


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2006 3:22:40 AM
      Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] recycling how do/getting rid of junk/electronics recycling

      So how much money can you typically get for an equally typical Pentium-class
      minitower? I ask only because it sounds like a lot of work for a little
      money... of course this whole discussion is (arguably) off-topic... since
      we'd never recycle anything worth collecting! :)

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Bill Pileggi [mailto:wpileggi@juno. com]
      Sent: Tuesday, November 14, 2006 2:51 AM
      To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com; jscheef@yahoo. com
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] recycling how do/getting rid of junk/electronics
      recycling

      Dear Jim, et al:
      Just to make sure things are clear: computers are only "haz-mats" as a
      whole, assembled, computer. And as we know, the only hazardous material (in
      any quantity) is the leaded glass in CRTs - which we aren't discussing
      here....[As an aside, our local counties have collected computers for the
      last couple of years as p/o haz-mat days. If you ask nicely, you may be
      allowed to pick through the junk. If you want first pick, VOLUNTEER for the
      morning. I picked up a couple of decent original IBM monitors I needed, and
      one time, a nice piece of vacuum tube audio gear - we know where that went
      :-) ]

      To get some value from the machines, they MUST be taken apart. Steel cases
      gets crushed. We've been able to have them picked up for free by a local guy
      who collects steel. There may be a manufacturing company who will let you
      put in their steel scrap dumpster. Otherwise, placed with normal trash.
      Plastic trim panels get placed with normal trash.

      Motherboards, pull off CPUs, cables, memory, etc. Empty Motherboards get
      placed in cardboard cartons as 'gold scrap'. Cabling - cut off connectors
      and place in 'gold scrap'. The rest of the wire goes into
      (covered) 'wire scrap'. (Note: wire scrap is different than "copper scrap".
      Copper scrap is pure, uncovered, copper. For example, copper plumbing pipe.
      This is worth several times what wire scrap is worth.
      Don't try to remove the insulation, it's a waste of time.) Power supply
      cables - cut off connectors and place in regular trash, wire goes in 'wire
      scrap'. CPUs with gold-plated pins get placed in "high-grade" gold-scrap. (I
      use zip-lock sandwich bags...). Pentium II and III in plastic housing (slot
      1): use a screwdriver to snap apart the case - you'll see an actual cutout
      along the connector edge where a capacitor is mounted on the board. Shove
      the screwdriver in there and and break open. The heatsink plate goes in
      aluminum scrap. I cut off the edge connector with a pair of large tin-snips
      and put in "high-grade" . The rest goes in gold scrap.

      Hard disk drives get taken apart. (You'll need a set of TORX drivers:
      T-6 through T-10 and T-15.) Motors get placed in regular trash. Boards get
      placed in 'gold scrap'. Housing, chassis, platters get placed in 'aluminum
      scrap'. The magnets are given away at hamfests or placed on refrigerator
      door. (Note: I usually bring several pounds of the magnets to hamfests, and
      they ALWAYS get taken. Caution - they are STRONG. You can easily pinch your
      fingers.) Floppy disk drives with aluminum chassis get taken apart.
      Everything except the aluminum chassis and gold plated connector goes in
      trash.

      ISA/PCI, etc. cards - cut off the gold-plated edge connector with a pair of
      large tin-snips and put in "high-grade" . You may also use the snips to cut
      off any other connectors, or simply place the card in gold scrap. Memory -
      cut off the gold plated edge connector with a pair of large tin-snips and
      put in "high-grade" . Otherwise, place in trash.
      CDROM drives - break off the gold plated edge connector with a pair of LARGE
      pliers and put in "high-grade" . (Note: there is an art to doing this in one
      step. When practicing, remove the bottom cover screws
      first.) The rest is placed in regular trash.

      Open up the phone book and look under "Scrap Metal Dealers". (Any decent
      sized town will have several. Near large cities, you may have quite a few
      choices.) The ones who buy non-ferrous metals, like aluminum and copper,
      most likely will also buy (plastic) covered wire and gold scrap. You may
      also ask for a referal, if they do not buy gold scrap. Non-ferrous metals
      scrap is a competitive business, you may call around for the best prices. As
      a note, until last year, I got 10 cents a pound for plastic covered wire.
      Hardly worth the effort (unless you've accumulated 100's of hard disk drive
      cables). Now, with finished copper at $3.30, it's up to 40-45 cents a pound
      (or more?). Dealers also like you to have a couple hundred pounds of scrap
      at a time, too, so it may pay to combine your efforts with others. I take my
      friend's smaller quantities of scrap with me when I go to the scrap dealer.
      I used to sell my gold scrap to variety of people at hamfests, etc. I
      happened to ask my aluminum scrap dealer a few years back if he knew local
      gold-scrap buyers, and he said, yes, him. Now he doesn't pay me as much as
      the guy he sells it to, but it does save me money, going to one guy to get
      rid of it all. And, I'm getting much more than I ever got before, relatively
      speaking. Bill/KA3AIS

      3. recycling how do
      Posted by: "Jim Scheef" jscheef@yahoo. com jscheef
      Date: Sun Nov 12, 2006 6:50 pm ((PST))

      Bill,
      Very interesting. What kind of scrap dealer and where? Here in CT where I
      live one must pay at the recycling center to dispose of old machines
      - except on that annual festival of recycling - Hazardous Materials Day.
      Jim

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Bill Pileggi <wpileggi@juno. com>
      To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Sunday, November 12, 2006 1:34:34 AM
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] Where 2 draw the line - getting rid of junk To
      Robb, et al:
      As much as I hate to mention it, with gold prices where they are, the
      average PC motherboard (working or not), is worth more than a dollar++ each.
      If you have a pile of them gathering dust, that could be money in your
      pocket. Pull out the CPUs: 386/486/Pentiums, etc. have gold plated pins and
      are worth $5-15 pound, probably more, as I haven't had a price breakdown
      since early in the year. Even those gray hard disk and floppy disk cables
      are worth 40 cents a pound, now, with copper at $3.30 a pound. I cut off the
      connectors, and toss them in with the motherboards. Wire from the power
      supplies goes in the scrap box, too.
      (Don't forget the hard disk drives are almost pure aluminum, and floppy
      chassis are also usually aluminum. The gold plated connectors get cut off
      and tossed in with motherboards. ) With ISA/PCI, etc. cards, I cut off the
      "fingers" and toss them in with CPUs. The rest of the card gets placed in
      the trash (any extra gold plated pins get cut off and placed with gold
      scrap).
      I accumulate 100-200++ systems/boards a year, just from neighbors and
      friends. The best gets rebuilt and given away. The rest, pentiums, P-II, and
      older, gets scrapped. Interesting classic items get listed here, on this
      forum, for give-away. I keep representative items in my "collection" , but
      at least the rest is getting recycled. I do not scrap directly myself, but
      take my sorted materials to a scrap dealer who purchases them. If I can
      provide any assistance, as I've been doing this since the late 1970's,
      please write. My basement and bedroom are crowded now, if I didn't keep up
      the pace, I shudder to think.....Bill/ KA3AIS

      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
      Try Juno Platinum for Free! Then, only $9.95/month!
      Unlimited Internet Access with 1GB of Email Storage.
      Visit http://www.juno. com/value to sign up today!

      Yahoo! Groups Links


    • Bill Pileggi
      Evan, Not a lot of money in it. Minimally $2, to $4(at most) each. However, since we all(?) open up the computers we re given to see what s inside, half the
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 14, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Evan, Not a lot of money in it. Minimally $2, to $4(at most) each.
        However, since we all(?) open up the computers we're given to see
        what's inside, half the work is done. It only takes 1-2 minutes to
        liberate the motherboard, cables, CPU and cards. When you aren't being
        careful about it, amazing how fast it can be accomplished. I pile all
        the HDDs into a box and take them all apart at once when I want to
        watch TV or a movie.

        I'm still collecting CPUs (have any 487s to share?)(still looking for
        certain 286 and 386 chips), VGA cards, some sound cards, so I HAVE TO
        open up the box to see the innards.

        If you have a kid, and a garage/basement full of junker computers
        (nothing classic!), an afternoon's worth of work (sitting down, no
        less!) could yield the kid $50-100+ or more... Bill KA3AIS

        Posted by: "Evan Koblentz" evan@... evan947
        So how much money can you typically get for an equally typical
        Pentium-class
        minitower? I ask only because it sounds like a lot of work for a little
        money... of course this whole discussion is (arguably) off-topic... since
        we'd never recycle anything worth collecting! :)



        ________________________________________________________________________
        Try Juno Platinum for Free! Then, only $9.95/month!
        Unlimited Internet Access with 1GB of Email Storage.
        Visit http://www.juno.com/value to sign up today!
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.