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Re: [midatlanticretro] Vintagecomputer.net Updates

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  • Jim Scheef
    Bill, Your site always looks great. You have an amazing ability to clean up these old machines! An article on your techniques would be nice. Jim ... From: B.
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 30, 2006
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      Bill,

      Your site always looks great. You have an amazing ability to clean up these old machines! An article on your techniques would be nice.

      Jim

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: B. Degnan <billdeg@...>
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, October 29, 2006 11:31:57 AM
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] Vintagecomputer.net Updates

      Hi -
      I have made a lot of updates to my web site, if you care to take a look

      http://vintagecompu ter.net/

      Bill D


    • Herb Johnson
      ... Nice updates to your site! 1) the California Computer System is a S-100 chassis (case, power supply, presumably motherboard) with non-CCS boards in it,
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 30, 2006
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        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "B. Degnan" <billdeg@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi -
        > I have made a lot of updates to my web site, if you care to take a look
        >
        > http://vintagecomputer.net/
        >
        > Bill D
        >
        Nice updates to your site!

        1) the California Computer System is a S-100 chassis (case, power
        supply, presumably motherboard) with non-CCS boards in it, such as the
        Jade Z80 card. The software to run that system will be defined by the
        cards inside of it, most notibly the floppy disk controller card. I
        don't know that you can "call" it a CCS "system" just because of the
        box. Many many S-100 systems consisted of variety of cards: that was
        the point of the S-100 bus. I've identified over *100* S-100
        manufacturers.

        2) The "particle counter" looks like a test instrument built around a
        Commodore business computer. Can you identify if it is in the
        Commodore "package" or case and is simply repainted; or if the CBM
        computer was "re-packaged" in a different case? It's interesting to
        see either way.

        3) The Volscan article on your page is interesting. I don't know what
        is the earliest "light pens" or "light gun" as the article described.
        You might do a patent search. CRT's go back to the early 20th
        century, but electronics to interpret a LIGHT signal from them would
        be later. And "computers" with devices to combine visual feedback with
        mechanical adjustment are at least as old as the Norman (sic?)
        bombsight of WWII, which was a mechanical computer.

        Herb JOhnson

        Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
        <a href="http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/"> web site</a>
        <a href="http://retrotechnology.net/herbs_stuff/"> domain mirror</a>
        my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
        if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
        "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
        S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"
      • B Degnan
        Jim Thanks. Once I get all of the back-logged items into my site, I may very well add an article about cleaning vintage computers. Bill ... clean up these old
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 30, 2006
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          Jim
          Thanks. Once I get all of the back-logged items into my site, I
          may very well add an article about cleaning vintage computers.
          Bill

          At Monday, 30 October 2006, you wrote:

          >Bill,Your site always looks great. You have an amazing ability to
          clean up these old machines! An article on your techniques would
          be nice.Jim----- Original Message ----From: B. Degnan <billdeg@degnanco.
          com>To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.comSent: Sunday, October 29,
          2006 11:31:57 AMSubject: [midatlanticretro] Vintagecomputer.net
          Updates
          >
          > Hi -
          >I have made a lot of updates to my web site, if you care to take a look
          >
          >http://vintagecompu ter.net/
          >
          >Bill D
          >
          >
          >
          >



          -- E N D --
        • B. Degnan
          thanks. ... Old Byte and Kilobauds are full way outstuff. I have a lot more pictures of the cards, etc. to still post. The CCS. ... Yes it is a CBM 8296.
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 30, 2006
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            thanks.



            > >
            > Nice updates to your site!
            >
            >1) the California Computer System is a S-100 chassis (case, power
            >supply, presumably motherboard) with non-CCS boards in it, such as the
            >Jade Z80 card. The software to run that system will be defined by the
            >cards inside of it, most notibly the floppy disk controller card. I
            >don't know that you can "call" it a CCS "system" just because of the
            >box. Many many S-100 systems consisted of variety of cards: that was
            >the point of the S-100 bus. I've identified over *100* S-100
            >manufacturers.

            Old Byte and Kilobauds are full way outstuff. I have a lot more pictures
            of the cards, etc. to still post. The CCS.

            >2) The "particle counter" looks like a test instrument built around a
            >Commodore business computer. Can you identify if it is in the
            >Commodore "package" or case and is simply repainted; or if the CBM
            >computer was "re-packaged" in a different case? It's interesting to
            >see either way.

            Yes it is a CBM 8296. more details
            here:http://www.vintagecomputer.net/browse_thread.cfm?id=34


            >3) The Volscan article on your page is interesting. I don't know what
            >is the earliest "light pens" or "light gun" as the article described.
            >You might do a patent search. CRT's go back to the early 20th
            >century, but electronics to interpret a LIGHT signal from them would
            >be later. And "computers" with devices to combine visual feedback with
            >mechanical adjustment are at least as old as the Norman (sic?)
            >bombsight of WWII, which was a mechanical computer.

            I received a lot of info from the web on the Volscan. I am glad to have
            written about it. Thanks for the feedback.

            Bill

            >Herb JOhnson
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