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Re: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

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  • Jim Scheef
    Evan, OK, good point. Obviously everything must be high enough or positioned such that people can walk unimpeded. Jim ... From: Evan Koblentz
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 14, 2006
      Evan,
       
      OK, good point. Obviously everything must be high enough or positioned such that people can walk unimpeded.
       
      Jim

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 1:21:56 PM
      Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

      I know exactly what you mean.  I was just thinking of a clear plastic covering because our rooms have ceilings within reach of tall curious nerds.


      From: Bob Applegate [mailto:bob@ applegate. org]
      Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 1:20 PM
      To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

      Or use traditional suspended wiring trays.  A tad more expensive, but very common in
      big computing centers (we have them all over the lab in one of our buildings).  It looks
      like an aluminum ladder hanging from the ceiling; lots of room to drop wires where needed.
       
      Bob
       
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 1:04 PM
      Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

      Ah, I didn't realize that you meant as hangers.
       
      We can definitely install an overhead see-through channel.  That would be neat.  We could possibly encase it in clear plexiglass or something with access pnels every few feet.


      From: Jim Scheef [mailto:jscheef@ yahoo.com]
      Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 12:54 PM
      To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

      Evan,

      Well, I mean for the cables to be visible, running in wire hangers which are, in turn, hung from the ceiling. Exposing the low voltage wiring like terminal and network cables should have an advantage in meeting fire codes. AC power is another matter. Long extension cords will not be acceptable. This is a public area so we need to be extremely careful to meet all building codes.

      Jim

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
      To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
      Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 1:54:14 AM
      Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

      Cables will be easy to do overhead, our museum area (if I recall correctly)
      just has that lowered tile stuff.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jim Scheef [mailto:jscheef@yahoo. com]
      Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 1:28 AM
      To: MARCH
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] The Green Screen Experience

      Hello all,

      I've been talking about this idea since the I first became involved in the
      museum. I'd like to see ASCII terminals of various types scattered about the
      museum. The terminals would access a menu-driven system that explains each
      of the exhibits and the facilities of the museum. They could also access a
      catalog of the collection, and the contents of the research library (another
      idea for the museum). The terminals provide a means to get the visitor
      involved in the exhibits without putting the valuable artifacts at risk.
      ASCII terminals (and the IBM 3270 tubes I "grew up" on iin the 70's and
      80's) were how most people used computers until the PC arrived in offices so
      using them is a really good way we can educate people about "larger"
      computers - which brings me to my latest haul. I'll post inforation on "our"
      new MicroVAX 3100 tomorrow. While I would like to see this VAX system drive
      all the terminals, it might be easier and more reliable to just set up a
      nice Linux box and drive the terminals from that. I have a 24-port terminal
      server (Evan, remember back to TCF.) which ought to keep us going for some
      time.

      BTW, running cables in the museum will be a challenge. Rather than try to
      hide them I suggest that we string them overhead like I've seen in some
      modern offices. That way people can see what makes the terminals, networks,
      etc., work!

      Jim

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