Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

Expand Messages
  • Evan Koblentz
    MARCHins, Now that we ve got some real museum space under renovation (albeit there is still lots to do), it is time to put serious consideration into our first
    Message 1 of 29 , Sep 11, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      MARCHins,

      Now that we've got some real museum space under renovation (albeit there is
      still lots to do), it is time to put serious consideration into our first
      exhibits.

      I have a bunch of ideas. Some ideas for the first two or three exhibits
      are:
      - Computers of the Mid-Atlantic and/or Computers of New Jersey -- appeals to
      the local audience.
      - The personal computer revolution -- colorful, flexible to design, easy to
      get lots of stuff that still works.
      - Computers in the Army (ENIAC, ENIGMA, SAGE, early microprocessors, etc.)
      -- this would be a great tie-in to the rest of InfoAge and would certainly
      help us gain the respect of InfoAge's management who are very
      military-centric in their vision for the facility.

      Future ideas:
      - The history of videogames / PC games -- appeals to children and their
      nerdy fathers.
      - Computing in business -- the opportunity to play with Big Iron, terminals,
      etc.
      - Portable computing -- abacii, slide rules, calculators, luggables,
      laptops, handhelds (this exhibit is my pet project!)
      - Operating systems -- speaks for itself and makes Mark "I (heart) OS/2
      Warp!" Dodel happy. :)
      - Applications -- a wide-open category, maybe narrow it to a local focus?
      - Input-output -- speaks for itself: peripherals galore!
      - Networking -- the earliest research to Ethernet (and Vines, etc.) to
      ARPAnet...
      - Computing's future -- a small exhibit that says, "You just saw the past,
      what happens next?"
      - Your idea here -- make a suggestion!

      Somebody had the idea several months ago to decorate our museum hallway's
      walls with relevant computer art, ads, headlines, maybe a timeline,
      t-shirts, logos, software boxes, etc. .... I think that's a great idea and
      it would really set apart our space. (I forget who thought of it.)

      If we work hard, then I anticipate our official "opening" by next summer,
      maybe even in time for VCF East 4.0 if we're very lucky. I also propose
      that we name it the "MARCH-Grabbe Computer Museum" in honor of Dmitry Grabbe
      who donated the vast majority of the current InfoAge computer collection.
      Then we can have a grand opening event and ceremony, etc. which will draw
      plenty of public and media interest. It would be * AWESOME * if we can
      merge that with VCF East.

      Pardon me for being redundant and getting a bit misty-eyed, but seriously,
      how cool would that be for our club after only 2.5 years of all-volunteer
      existence!? Why, I feel like a proud father already. Someone get me a
      cigar!*

      - Evan

      * I don't smoke, so the chocolate variety is preferred.
    • Jim Scheef
      Evan, We all have our favorite ideas for exhibits and those you listed are all great ideas. I have many grand visions for our museum. Right now I think we
      Message 2 of 29 , Sep 12, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Evan,

        We all have our favorite ideas for exhibits and those you listed are all great ideas. I have many grand visions for our museum. Right now I think we should focus on the "best" exhibit we can do in the least time given our present resources of cash, time, available computers/artifacts and "support materials". The latter item refers to shelving, display cases, etc. For example, an item that can be displayed sitting on the floor requires only signs while an Altair needs a strong table with something to prevent people from touching the switches IN ADDITION to signs explaining what it is, why it's important, and why there is no keyboard or screen.

        What can we display given our current contraints? One idea might be a timeline of memory parts starting with that module from Univac (use pictures to fill in some missing items).

        Jim


        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 2:46:12 AM
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

        MARCHins,

        Now that we've got some real museum space under renovation (albeit there is
        still lots to do), it is time to put serious consideration into our first
        exhibits.

        I have a bunch of ideas. Some ideas for the first two or three exhibits
        are:
        - Computers of the Mid-Atlantic and/or Computers of New Jersey -- appeals to
        the local audience.
        - The personal computer revolution -- colorful, flexible to design, easy to
        get lots of stuff that still works.
        - Computers in the Army (ENIAC, ENIGMA, SAGE, early microprocessors, etc.)
        -- this would be a great tie-in to the rest of InfoAge and would certainly
        help us gain the respect of InfoAge's management who are very
        military-centric in their vision for the facility.

        Future ideas:
        - The history of videogames / PC games -- appeals to children and their
        nerdy fathers.
        - Computing in business -- the opportunity to play with Big Iron, terminals,
        etc.
        - Portable computing -- abacii, slide rules, calculators, luggables,
        laptops, handhelds (this exhibit is my pet project!)
        - Operating systems -- speaks for itself and makes Mark "I (heart) OS/2
        Warp!" Dodel happy. :)
        - Applications -- a wide-open category, maybe narrow it to a local focus?
        - Input-output -- speaks for itself: peripherals galore!
        - Networking -- the earliest research to Ethernet (and Vines, etc.) to
        ARPAnet...
        - Computing's future -- a small exhibit that says, "You just saw the past,
        what happens next?"
        - Your idea here -- make a suggestion!

        Somebody had the idea several months ago to decorate our museum hallway's
        walls with relevant computer art, ads, headlines, maybe a timeline,
        t-shirts, logos, software boxes, etc. .... I think that's a great idea and
        it would really set apart our space. (I forget who thought of it.)

        If we work hard, then I anticipate our official "opening" by next summer,
        maybe even in time for VCF East 4.0 if we're very lucky. I also propose
        that we name it the "MARCH-Grabbe Computer Museum" in honor of Dmitry Grabbe
        who donated the vast majority of the current InfoAge computer collection.
        Then we can have a grand opening event and ceremony, etc. which will draw
        plenty of public and media interest. It would be * AWESOME * if we can
        merge that with VCF East.

        Pardon me for being redundant and getting a bit misty-eyed, but seriously,
        how cool would that be for our club after only 2.5 years of all-volunteer
        existence!? Why, I feel like a proud father already. Someone get me a
        cigar!*

        - Evan

        * I don't smoke, so the chocolate variety is preferred.


      • Evan Koblentz
        Everything will need signs. ... from Univac (use pictures to fill in some missing items). Easy, but rather dull. I think the best place to start is the
        Message 3 of 29 , Sep 12, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Everything will need signs.
           
          >>> One idea might be a timeline of memory parts starting with that module from Univac (use pictures to fill in some missing items).
          Easy, but rather dull.  I think the "best" place to start is the computers of the mid-atlantic and/or NJ and/or northeast exhibit.  That appeals directly to the people who will actually visit our museum and make donations.  (I learned as a journalist that people love human interest stories because they like to read about people like themselves.)  So in other words, familiarity breeds success.  It will also be a unique exhibit -- every computer museum has an exhibit of memory or storage or chips.


          From: Jim Scheef [mailto:jscheef@...]
          Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 4:26 PM
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

          Evan,

          We all have our favorite ideas for exhibits and those you listed are all great ideas. I have many grand visions for our museum. Right now I think we should focus on the "best" exhibit we can do in the least time given our present resources of cash, time, available computers/artifacts and "support materials". The latter item refers to shelving, display cases, etc. For example, an item that can be displayed sitting on the floor requires only signs while an Altair needs a strong table with something to prevent people from touching the switches IN ADDITION to signs explaining what it is, why it's important, and why there is no keyboard or screen.

          What can we display given our current contraints? One idea might be a timeline of memory parts starting with that module from Univac (use pictures to fill in some missing items).

          Jim


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, September 12, 2006 2:46:12 AM
          Subject: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

          MARCHins,

          Now that we've got some real museum space under renovation (albeit there is
          still lots to do), it is time to put serious consideration into our first
          exhibits.

          I have a bunch of ideas. Some ideas for the first two or three exhibits
          are:
          - Computers of the Mid-Atlantic and/or Computers of New Jersey -- appeals to
          the local audience.
          - The personal computer revolution -- colorful, flexible to design, easy to
          get lots of stuff that still works.
          - Computers in the Army (ENIAC, ENIGMA, SAGE, early microprocessors, etc.)
          -- this would be a great tie-in to the rest of InfoAge and would certainly
          help us gain the respect of InfoAge's management who are very
          military-centric in their vision for the facility.

          Future ideas:
          - The history of videogames / PC games -- appeals to children and their
          nerdy fathers.
          - Computing in business -- the opportunity to play with Big Iron, terminals,
          etc.
          - Portable computing -- abacii, slide rules, calculators, luggables,
          laptops, handhelds (this exhibit is my pet project!)
          - Operating systems -- speaks for itself and makes Mark "I (heart) OS/2
          Warp!" Dodel happy. :)
          - Applications -- a wide-open category, maybe narrow it to a local focus?
          - Input-output -- speaks for itself: peripherals galore!
          - Networking -- the earliest research to Ethernet (and Vines, etc.) to
          ARPAnet...
          - Computing's future -- a small exhibit that says, "You just saw the past,
          what happens next?"
          - Your idea here -- make a suggestion!

          Somebody had the idea several months ago to decorate our museum hallway's
          walls with relevant computer art, ads, headlines, maybe a timeline,
          t-shirts, logos, software boxes, etc. .... I think that's a great idea and
          it would really set apart our space. (I forget who thought of it.)

          If we work hard, then I anticipate our official "opening" by next summer,
          maybe even in time for VCF East 4.0 if we're very lucky. I also propose
          that we name it the "MARCH-Grabbe Computer Museum" in honor of Dmitry Grabbe
          who donated the vast majority of the current InfoAge computer collection.
          Then we can have a grand opening event and ceremony, etc. which will draw
          plenty of public and media interest. It would be * AWESOME * if we can
          merge that with VCF East.

          Pardon me for being redundant and getting a bit misty-eyed, but seriously,
          how cool would that be for our club after only 2.5 years of all-volunteer
          existence!? Why, I feel like a proud father already. Someone get me a
          cigar!*

          - Evan

          * I don't smoke, so the chocolate variety is preferred.


        • B. Degnan
          I like Herb Johnson s (and others) idea of incorporating terminal-based displays. Terminals are still plentiful and can be run without a lot of technical
          Message 4 of 29 , Sep 12, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            I like Herb Johnson's (and others) idea of incorporating terminal-based displays.  Terminals are still plentiful and can be run without a lot of technical expertise.  2 terminals on a table with a table cloth, tent cards, a framed poster and voila...you have the start of an exhibit.  The terminals can be wired to a terminal server in a safe place (another room).  We can expand the complexity of the network over time (more servers, storage, a BBS for the the micros to "dial" into, etc.) .    Something that initializes automatically upon boot so that anyone in charge can start up the system for visitors and then turn off when not using.

            I see someday a walking tour of terminal server clusters, each attached to a different minicomputer or terminal server.  The terminals can be "displays" for other exhibits, etc.

            Just brainstorming.

            Bill D


            At 04:48 PM 9/12/2006 -0400, you wrote:
            Everything will need signs.
             
            >>> One idea might be a timeline of memory parts starting with that module from Univac (use pictures to fill in some missing items).
            Easy, but rather dull.  I think the "best" place to start is the computers of the mid-atlantic and/or NJ and/or northeast exhibit.  That appeals directly to the people who will actually visit our museum and make donations.  (I learned as a journalist that people love human interest stories because they like to read about people like themselves.)  So in other words, familiarity breeds success.  It will also be a unique exhibit -- every computer museum has an exhibit of memory or storage or chips.
          • Mike Loewen
            I received a note from someone who has a TRS-80 Model 100 laptop available in the Montgomeryville/North Penn/Lansdale (PA) area. If anyone is interested in
            Message 5 of 29 , Sep 13, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              I received a note from someone who has a TRS-80 Model 100 laptop
              available in the Montgomeryville/North Penn/Lansdale (PA) area. If anyone
              is interested in picking up this machine, send me a note off list, and
              I'll put you in touch with him.


              Mike Loewen mloewen@...
              Old Technology http://ripsaw.cac.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
            • Bob Grieb
              This movie came out in 1956, not the late 60 s as suggested. A few years before Deforest Kelly ever said He s dead, Jim! ...
              Message 6 of 29 , Sep 13, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                This movie came out in 1956, not the late 60's as suggested.
                A few years before Deforest Kelly ever said "He's dead, Jim!"...


                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                http://mail.yahoo.com
              • Jim Scheef
                Hello again all, Here is a stream of conscousness brain dump of thoughts about our initial exhibits: 1 - These first exhibits are not necessarily permanent.
                Message 7 of 29 , Sep 14, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hello again all,

                  Here is a stream of conscousness brain dump of thoughts about our initial exhibits:

                  1 - These first exhibits are not necessarily permanent. Over time we will do and redo better exhibits. These first ones are just to get us going.

                  1.5 - Our first exhibits need to be as self-explainitory as possible. The person on duty each weekend will not necessary know details about all of the exhibits so each exhibit should to able to tell its own story.

                  2 - We have very little cash with which to purchase materials. We must build or buy everything in our museum - tables, shelves, signs, cables, etc. Everything.we don't already have must come from somewhere - including the time and effort to put it all together.

                  3 - My initial suggestions, while some might be lame or boring, are intended to be affordable and quick. Right now things like "The Green Screen Experience" do not meet the tests of affordability or speed.

                  4 - I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our museum to computers made on the right coast. For this to be cohesive it will require a lot of thought and planning, so lets keep the suggestions coming. However, we need our primary focus to be on what we can do now - just to get started. It might be more fun to design exhibits for down the road, but right now we need to figure out how to turn 2x4's and 1x10's into exhibit shelves.

                  5 - A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge. I don't know how long a wall space we could devote to this but it would be cheap, easy to update and educational.

                  Jim
                • David Gesswein
                  ... Works moving and getting rid furniture so I am grabbing some stuff. 1 6 fake wood bookcase. More like that are available and may be able to get one 5
                  Message 8 of 29 , Sep 14, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    > 2 - We have very little cash with which to purchase materials. We must
                    >build or buy everything in our museum - tables, shelves, signs, cables, etc.
                    >Everything.we don't already have must come from somewhere - including the
                    >time and effort to put it all together.
                    >
                    Works moving and getting rid furniture so I am grabbing some stuff.

                    1 6' fake wood bookcase. More like that are available and may be able to
                    get one 5' nicer finish if we want more

                    1 white computer table

                    Can get 6' non folding table(s), smaller 4'? non folding table(s), some
                    other computerish tables, a larger computerish table with spot for lower
                    keyboard.

                    I also have grabbed 4 6' folding tables. I assume these aren't for
                    permanent exhibits but to share with infoage for temporary stuff.

                    If people have ideas on what is best to grab and how much let me know. I
                    will be getting it tomorrow morning. Sorry no display cases.

                    Its been too long since I have seen the collection to know whats best to take.
                  • Jeffrey Frady
                    I m still waiting for wifi. :-)
                    Message 9 of 29 , Sep 14, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I'm still waiting for wifi.  :-)

                      On 14/09/06, David Gesswein <djg@...> wrote:

                      > 2 - We have very little cash with which to purchase materials. We must
                      >build or buy everything in our museum - tables, shelves, signs, cables, etc.
                      >Everything.we don't already have must come from somewhere - including the
                      >time and effort to put it all together.
                      >
                      Works moving and getting rid furniture so I am grabbing some stuff.

                      1 6' fake wood bookcase. More like that are available and may be able to
                      get one 5' nicer finish if we want more

                      1 white computer table

                      Can get 6' non folding table(s), smaller 4'? non folding table(s), some
                      other computerish tables, a larger computerish table with spot for lower
                      keyboard.

                      I also have grabbed 4 6' folding tables. I assume these aren't for
                      permanent exhibits but to share with infoage for temporary stuff.

                      If people have ideas on what is best to grab and how much let me know. I
                      will be getting it tomorrow morning. Sorry no display cases.

                      Its been too long since I have seen the collection to know whats best to take.


                    • Jim Scheef
                      David, It all sounds very good and useful. It we can t use the book cases for exhibits, they will certainly work for the reference library. That stuff will
                      Message 10 of 29 , Sep 14, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        David,
                         
                        It all sounds very good and useful. It we can't use the book cases for exhibits, they will certainly work for the reference library. That stuff will require some effort - particularly the non-folding tables - to move to InfoAge. Please contact me and Evan off list so we can discuss the moving details.
                         
                        Jim

                        ----- Original Message ----
                        From: David Gesswein <djg@...>
                        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Thursday, September 14, 2006 6:30:34 PM
                        Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                        > 2 - We have very little cash with which to purchase materials. We must
                        >build or buy everything in our museum - tables, shelves, signs, cables, etc.
                        >Everything. we don't already have must come from somewhere - including the
                        >time and effort to put it all together.
                        >

                        Works moving and getting rid furniture so I am grabbing some stuff.

                        1 6' fake wood bookcase. More like that are available and may be able to
                        get one 5' nicer finish if we want more

                        1 white computer table

                        Can get 6' non folding table(s), smaller 4'? non folding table(s), some
                        other computerish tables, a larger computerish table with spot for lower
                        keyboard.

                        I also have grabbed 4 6' folding tables. I assume these aren't for
                        permanent exhibits but to share with infoage for temporary stuff.

                        If people have ideas on what is best to grab and how much let me know. I
                        will be getting it tomorrow morning. Sorry no display cases.

                        Its been too long since I have seen the collection to know whats best to take.

                      • Evan Koblentz
                        ... computers made on the right coast. Well I m thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                        Message 11 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                           >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our museum to computers made on the right coast. 
                           
                          Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                           
                          >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge. 
                           
                          That would be too small.  We have a LOT of wall space.  I haven't measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on our side of the hallway.  But maybe we could paint a section of the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper!  It would be tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.  Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline in order to determine how much space is needed.  We could probably borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                           
                          Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning, basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed.  So there will be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we can do the really FUN work.  Meanwhile I am profusely happy that we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?
                        • Bob Applegate
                          Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented? The history of California computer companies are pretty well documented. It would certainly be worth mentioning
                          Message 12 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented?  The history of California computer
                            companies are pretty well documented.  It would certainly be worth mentioning major
                            milestones in the computer history, but not a lot of details for things not local.  BTW,
                            don't forget that local computing history goes back to ENIAC, so that 60' of wall space
                            can be sucked up pretty quickly!
                             
                            So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and accomplishments?
                             
                               * Eniac at Upenn
                               * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                               * Perkin-Elmer/Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                               * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                               * Commodore - lots of history there!
                               * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                               * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                             
                            There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head. 
                             
                            There was talk at one point about some PE/Interdata machines that needed looking
                            at.  Are they still there?  I'll try to make a work session to have a look at them and
                            see if we can get something fired up.
                             
                            One other note... once again, I'll add my concern about carpet and antique computers.
                            I got yet another box of vintage computer boards that were wrapped in plastic bags...
                            AHHHHHH!!!!  99% of the people handling PC boards don't understand about static,
                            yet it can destroy things so easily.
                             
                            Carpet is a BAD THING in any display area where people can come in contact with
                            the equipment.  As nice as it is to walk on, you don't find carpet in computer rooms
                            nor ESD work areas for a good reason.  There are lots of people walking through, but
                            those systems aren't being made any more... they deserve some consideration.
                             
                            Bob
                             
                             
                            ----- Original Message -----
                            Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 9:10 AM
                            Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                             >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our museum to computers made on the right coast. 
                             
                            Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                             
                            >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge. 
                             
                            That would be too small.  We have a LOT of wall space.  I haven't measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on our side of the hallway.  But maybe we could paint a section of the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper!  It would be tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.  Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline in order to determine how much space is needed.  We could probably borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                             
                            Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning, basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed.  So there will be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we can do the really FUN work.  Meanwhile I am profusely happy that we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?

                          • Mike Loewen
                            ... ...and my personal favorite, the Whirlwind computer developed at MIT, which led to the SAGE system built by IBM at their Poughkeepsie and Kingston plants
                            Message 13 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                            • 0 Attachment
                              On Fri, 15 Sep 2006, Bob Applegate wrote:

                              > So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and accomplishments?
                              >
                              > * Eniac at Upenn
                              > * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                              > * Perkin-Elmer/Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                              > * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                              > * Commodore - lots of history there!
                              > * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                              > * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone

                              ...and my personal favorite, the Whirlwind computer developed at MIT,
                              which led to the SAGE system built by IBM at their Poughkeepsie and
                              Kingston plants in NY.


                              Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                              Old Technology http://ripsaw.cac.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                            • Jim Scheef
                              Bob, Good idea! Don t forget all the AT&T / UNIX developements that took place just down the road. Timeline events need not be limited to products. The breakup
                              Message 14 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Bob,

                                Good idea! Don't forget all the AT&T / UNIX developements that took place just down the road. Timeline events need not be limited to products. The breakup of AT&T enabled them to attempt to compete in the computer markplace. I think DEC should be included as well as IBM, Data General, etc. Think of the "east" as east of the Mississippi and Ohio Scientific comes in along with Heath/Zenith. We should include all these companies.

                                Jim

                                ----- Original Message ----
                                From: Bob Applegate <bob@...>
                                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 10:03:48 AM
                                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented?  The history of California computer
                                companies are pretty well documented.  It would certainly be worth mentioning major
                                milestones in the computer history, but not a lot of details for things not local.  BTW,
                                don't forget that local computing history goes back to ENIAC, so that 60' of wall space
                                can be sucked up pretty quickly!
                                 
                                So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and accomplishments?
                                 
                                   * Eniac at Upenn
                                   * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                   * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                   * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                   * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                   * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                   * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                 
                                There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head. 
                                 
                                There was talk at one point about some PE/Interdata machines that needed looking
                                at.  Are they still there?  I'll try to make a work session to have a look at them and
                                see if we can get something fired up.
                                 
                                One other note... once again, I'll add my concern about carpet and antique computers.
                                I got yet another box of vintage computer boards that were wrapped in plastic bags...
                                AHHHHHH!!!!  99% of the people handling PC boards don't understand about static,
                                yet it can destroy things so easily.
                                 
                                Carpet is a BAD THING in any display area where people can come in contact with
                                the equipment.  As nice as it is to walk on, you don't find carpet in computer rooms
                                nor ESD work areas for a good reason.  There are lots of people walking through, but
                                those systems aren't being made any more... they deserve some consideration.
                                 
                                Bob
                                 
                                 
                                ----- Original Message -----
                                Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 9:10 AM
                                Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                 >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our museum to computers made on the right coast. 
                                 
                                Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                                 
                                >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge. 
                                 
                                That would be too small.  We have a LOT of wall space.  I haven't measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on our side of the hallway.  But maybe we could paint a section of the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper!  It would be tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.  Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline in order to determine how much space is needed.  We could probably borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                                 
                                Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning, basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed.  So there will be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we can do the really FUN work.  Meanwhile I am profusely happy that we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?


                              • Sridhar Ayengar
                                ... IBM, damnit! I *work* in the place where mainframes are made! (Poughkeepsie, NY) Even the IBM PC is a product of the east coast. So were the PC/XT, PC/AT
                                Message 15 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Bob Applegate wrote:
                                  > So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and
                                  > accomplishments?
                                  >
                                  > * Eniac at Upenn
                                  > * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                  > * Perkin-Elmer/Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                  > * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                  > * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                  > * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                  > * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                  >
                                  > There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head.

                                  IBM, damnit! I *work* in the place where mainframes are made!
                                  (Poughkeepsie, NY)

                                  Even the IBM PC is a product of the east coast. So were the PC/XT,
                                  PC/AT and PS/2. (Raleigh, NC)

                                  Peace... Sridhar
                                • Joyce Weisbecker
                                  Folks, don t forget South Jersey s contribution! * COSMAC 1802 microprocessor; COSMAC ELF; MicroTutor; COSMAC VIP; RCA Studiio II TV Programmer - all from RCA
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                                  • 0 Attachment
                                    Folks, don't forget South Jersey's contribution!
                                     
                                       * COSMAC 1802 microprocessor; COSMAC ELF; MicroTutor; COSMAC VIP; RCA Studiio II TV Programmer - all from RCA' Sarnoff Labs in Princeton, NJ in the 1970's
                                     
                                    For more info, contact
                                     
                                    Alexander B. Magoun, Ph.D.
                                    Executive Director
                                    David Sarnoff Library
                                    201 Washington Road, CN 5300
                                    Princeton, NJ 08543-5300
                                    609-734-2636
                                    amagoun@...
                                    (f) 609-734-2339
                                    www.davidsarnoff.org
                                    www.davidsarnoff.blogspot.com 
                                     
                                       Joyce Weisbecker

                                    Jim Scheef <jscheef@...> wrote:
                                    Bob,

                                    Good idea! Don't forget all the AT&T / UNIX developements that took place just down the road. Timeline events need not be limited to products. The breakup of AT&T enabled them to attempt to compete in the computer markplace. I think DEC should be included as well as IBM, Data General, etc. Think of the "east" as east of the Mississippi and Ohio Scientific comes in along with Heath/Zenith. We should include all these companies.

                                    Jim

                                    ----- Original Message ----
                                    From: Bob Applegate <bob@applegate. org>
                                    To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                                    Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 10:03:48 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                    Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented?  The history of California computer
                                    companies are pretty well documented.  It would certainly be worth mentioning major
                                    milestones in the computer history, but not a lot of details for things not local.  BTW,
                                    don't forget that local computing history goes back to ENIAC, so that 60' of wall space
                                    can be sucked up pretty quickly!
                                     
                                    So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and accomplishments?
                                     
                                       * Eniac at Upenn
                                       * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                       * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                       * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                       * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                       * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                       * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                     
                                    There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head. 
                                     
                                    There was talk at one point about some PE/Interdata machines that needed looking
                                    at.  Are they still there?  I'll try to make a work session to have a look at them and
                                    see if we can get something fired up.
                                     
                                    One other note... once again, I'll add my concern about carpet and antique computers.
                                    I got yet another box of vintage computer boards that were wrapped in plastic bags...
                                    AHHHHHH!!!!  99% of the people handling PC boards don't understand about static,
                                    yet it can destroy things so easily.
                                     
                                    Carpet is a BAD THING in any display area where people can come in contact with
                                    the equipment.  As nice as it is to walk on, you don't find carpet in computer rooms
                                    nor ESD work areas for a good reason.  There are lots of people walking through, but
                                    those systems aren't being made any more... they deserve some consideration.
                                     
                                    Bob
                                     
                                     
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 9:10 AM
                                    Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                     >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our museum to computers made on the right coast. 
                                     
                                    Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                                     
                                    >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge. 
                                     
                                    That would be too small.  We have a LOT of wall space.  I haven't measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on our side of the hallway.  But maybe we could paint a section of the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper!  It would be tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.  Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline in order to determine how much space is needed.  We could probably borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                                     
                                    Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning, basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed.  So there will be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we can do the really FUN work.  Meanwhile I am profusely happy that we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?



                                    Yahoo! Messenger with Voice. Make PC-to-Phone Calls to the US (and 30+ countries) for 2ยข/min or less.

                                  • Evan Koblentz
                                    I changed the subject line to reflect the current discussion topic. Let s limit the timeline to the mid-Atlantic and (lower) Northeast. That is our core;
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      I changed the subject line to reflect the current discussion topic.
                                       
                                      Let's limit the timeline to the mid-Atlantic and (lower) Northeast.  That is our core; we're not the "east half of the U.S. vintage computer club".   :)
                                       
                                      So, even though we have a stray member or two in North Carolina and California, our timeline should include anything that happened from Boston to Pittsburgh to D.C. .... I see that triangle as our constituency.
                                       
                                      Luckily, it leaves a plethora of historic activity to include.  (Bryan must be so happy reading this because I said "plethora".)  Boston gives us anything and everything associated with M.I.T. and the minicomputer revolution.  Pittsburgh gives us, well, whatever Dan R. tells us happened out there at Carnegie Mellon.  D.C. gives us the whole freaking ARPAnet and military.  Inside, we've got ENIAC and UNIVAC from Philly, AT&T & Casio & RCA & Sony from here in New Jersey, Commodore from the Pennsylvania 'burbs, and there's a tiny little start-up in New York that some of you might have heard of called IBM.
                                       
                                      Did I forget anything big?  Yes, and so we have more than enough to cover in the timeline.  Mike N.'s book "Collectible Microcomputers" list anotheer dozen+ small companies in NJ alone that I never heard of.  And there was Franklin, Perkin-Elmer, TDL, EAI .... the list goes on and on and on.  We can probably get more help from the IEEE History Center which is conveniently based at Rutgers.  In addition, Fred likes to remind me that either Mr. Hewlett or Mr. Packard (I always forget which one!) worked at Camp Evans (a.k.a. the old Army name for InfoAge), along with Howard Vollum who co-founded Tektronix.  (Although there is no relation between the guy named McAfee who was one of the Marconi / Camp Evans big-wigs and the modern McAfee Corp.)
                                       
                                      Who else should we include?  To help, I made a database in our Yahoo Group called "Computer companies of the Mid-Atlantic and lower Northeast" .... I seeded it with some of the basics; please add or correct what's necessary.  There is a lot still missing.

                                      From: Jim Scheef [mailto:jscheef@...]
                                      Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 11:58 AM
                                      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                      Bob,

                                      Good idea! Don't forget all the AT&T / UNIX developements that took place just down the road. Timeline events need not be limited to products. The breakup of AT&T enabled them to attempt to compete in the computer markplace. I think DEC should be included as well as IBM, Data General, etc. Think of the "east" as east of the Mississippi and Ohio Scientific comes in along with Heath/Zenith. We should include all these companies.

                                      Jim

                                      ----- Original Message ----
                                      From: Bob Applegate <bob@...>
                                      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 10:03:48 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                      Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented?  The history of California computer
                                      companies are pretty well documented.  It would certainly be worth mentioning major
                                      milestones in the computer history, but not a lot of details for things not local.  BTW,
                                      don't forget that local computing history goes back to ENIAC, so that 60' of wall space
                                      can be sucked up pretty quickly!
                                       
                                      So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and accomplishments?
                                       
                                         * Eniac at Upenn
                                         * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                         * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                         * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                         * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                         * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                         * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                       
                                      There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head. 
                                       
                                      There was talk at one point about some PE/Interdata machines that needed looking
                                      at.  Are they still there?  I'll try to make a work session to have a look at them and
                                      see if we can get something fired up.
                                       
                                      One other note... once again, I'll add my concern about carpet and antique computers.
                                      I got yet another box of vintage computer boards that were wrapped in plastic bags...
                                      AHHHHHH!!!!  99% of the people handling PC boards don't understand about static,
                                      yet it can destroy things so easily.
                                       
                                      Carpet is a BAD THING in any display area where people can come in contact with
                                      the equipment.  As nice as it is to walk on, you don't find carpet in computer rooms
                                      nor ESD work areas for a good reason.  There are lots of people walking through, but
                                      those systems aren't being made any more... they deserve some consideration.
                                       
                                      Bob
                                       
                                       
                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 9:10 AM
                                      Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                       >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our museum to computers made on the right coast. 
                                       
                                      Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                                       
                                      >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge. 
                                       
                                      That would be too small.  We have a LOT of wall space.  I haven't measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on our side of the hallway.  But maybe we could paint a section of the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper!  It would be tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.  Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline in order to determine how much space is needed.  We could probably borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                                       
                                      Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning, basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed.  So there will be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we can do the really FUN work.  Meanwhile I am profusely happy that we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?


                                    • Bob Applegate
                                      Sorry, I didn t mean to exclude IBM... I was really thinking of computer companies that aren t around anymore, and current companies never really entered my
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                                      • 0 Attachment
                                        Sorry, I didn't mean to exclude IBM... I was really thinking of computer companies that
                                        aren't around anymore, and current companies never really entered my mind. 
                                         
                                        Certainly, the timeline should include significant events, regardless of where the companies
                                        were located...
                                         
                                           * Cosmac in Popular Electronics (or whatever it was) - hobbyist computer
                                           * Altair - First S-100 system
                                           * IMSAI - machine that (more or less) standardized the S-100 bus
                                           * Apple I - Jobs and Woz displayed it at shows in NJ!
                                           * Apple II - first personal computer
                                           * Osborne?  First "portable" but might not be that key to computer history.
                                           * IBM PC
                                           * Mac
                                         
                                        Those references put the other events in perspective.  No need to show a lot of detail
                                        about Apple offerings or products from the plethora (there, we used the word TWICE
                                        in one day!) of S-100 systems, but some more details about the local companies is
                                        a different spin.  When I speak to folks about all the computing activities in this area
                                        in the 70s and 80s, they're surprised... you mean all of computer history wasn't written
                                        in Silicon Valley??? 
                                         
                                        Bob
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                         
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 12:09 PM
                                        Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                        Bob Applegate wrote:
                                        > So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and
                                        > accomplishments?
                                        >
                                        > * Eniac at Upenn
                                        > * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                        > * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                        > * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                        > * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                        > * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                        > * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                        >
                                        > There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head.

                                        IBM, damnit! I *work* in the place where mainframes are made!
                                        (Poughkeepsie, NY)

                                        Even the IBM PC is a product of the east coast. So were the PC/XT,
                                        PC/AT and PS/2. (Raleigh, NC)

                                        Peace... Sridhar

                                      • Evan Koblentz
                                        ... the 70s and 80s, they re surprised... you mean all of computer history wasn t written in Silicon Valley??? Exactly! Except we have the very unique
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Sep 15, 2006
                                        • 0 Attachment
                                          >>> When I speak to folks about all the computing activities in this area in the 70s and 80s, they're surprised... you mean all of computer history wasn't written in Silicon Valley???
                                           
                                          Exactly!  Except we have the very unique advantage of showing computer history starting in the 1940s because of ENIAC @ U.Penn. and the transistor being invented at Bell Labs, along with the fundamentals of the Internet between D.C. (ARPA/IPTO) and MIT.
                                           
                                          And who can forget the Harvard Mark 1, MIT's Whirlwind, Jay Forrester's invention of core memory...?  Or how about Ivan Sutherland becoming the master of computer graphics at Carnegie and then at MIT?  Let's also remember Willy Higinbotham doing "Tennis for Two" at Long Island's Brookhaven National Lab in 1958 and Slug Russell and Peter Samson doing Spacewar at MIT.
                                           
                                          Our timeline should have parallel sections in different colors -- one for general computer history and one for things related to the mid-atlantic and lower northeast (so I'm excluding New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.)
                                           


                                          From: Bob Applegate [mailto:bob@...]
                                          Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 2:08 PM
                                          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                          Sorry, I didn't mean to exclude IBM... I was really thinking of computer companies that
                                          aren't around anymore, and current companies never really entered my mind. 
                                           
                                          Certainly, the timeline should include significant events, regardless of where the companies
                                          were located...
                                           
                                             * Cosmac in Popular Electronics (or whatever it was) - hobbyist computer
                                             * Altair - First S-100 system
                                             * IMSAI - machine that (more or less) standardized the S-100 bus
                                             * Apple I - Jobs and Woz displayed it at shows in NJ!
                                             * Apple II - first personal computer
                                             * Osborne?  First "portable" but might not be that key to computer history.
                                             * IBM PC
                                             * Mac
                                           
                                          Those references put the other events in perspective.  No need to show a lot of detail
                                          about Apple offerings or products from the plethora (there, we used the word TWICE
                                          in one day!) of S-100 systems, but some more details about the local companies is
                                          a different spin.  When I speak to folks about all the computing activities in this area
                                          in the 70s and 80s, they're surprised... you mean all of computer history wasn't written
                                          in Silicon Valley??? 
                                           
                                          Bob
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                           
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 12:09 PM
                                          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...

                                          Bob Applegate wrote:
                                          > So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and
                                          > accomplishments?
                                          >
                                          > * Eniac at Upenn
                                          > * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                          > * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                          > * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                          > * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                          > * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                          > * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                          >
                                          > There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head.

                                          IBM, damnit! I *work* in the place where mainframes are made!
                                          (Poughkeepsie, NY)

                                          Even the IBM PC is a product of the east coast. So were the PC/XT,
                                          PC/AT and PS/2. (Raleigh, NC)

                                          Peace... Sridhar

                                        • Dan
                                          (warning, burst of ascii data commencing...) Even though I m in Pittsburgh, I still have long ties to the east coast too (Long Island). Relative to the east
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Sep 16, 2006
                                          • 0 Attachment
                                            (warning, burst of ascii data commencing...)

                                            Even though I'm in Pittsburgh, I still have long ties to the east coast
                                            too (Long Island). Relative to the east coast, I'm sort of in the
                                            boonies here (for computers that is). If it were robotics, then it's a
                                            different story. There's couple of links the I quickly found, but not
                                            sure if it's useful. I volunteer at the Science Center here so I picked
                                            up a few things while hacking around there.

                                            The Timeline is a good idea for that 60' wall you mentioned --get a good
                                            artist/designer(college intern--work for food)-- the content helps but
                                            the look helps too. I just think it's in bad taste to make it a east
                                            coast vs west coast thing, sounds like another Rapper convention.
                                            Highlighting the local innovations within the Timeline is always more
                                            appealing -- 'hey look what we did here...'

                                            About the carpets, it is bad, unless you get anti-static carpet ($$$) --
                                            but also, the attendees shouldn't man handle the equipment either. That
                                            might be fine for a children's museum, the exhibits ought to have some
                                            kind of barrier -- roped off, plexiglas covers, signs--'please do not
                                            touch(sensitive devices)', etc.

                                            Just a quick comment about the multimedia, there's some mention of an
                                            ascii terminal server to display the relevant historical info. I
                                            volunteer at our Science Center here and notice the the multimedia
                                            presentation makes a big difference. Maybe an updated server that
                                            contains visual multimedia is more appealing--alot of us like watching
                                            the History chan--appeal to the masses. I visit airshows, not only cause
                                            I worked on that stuff, but people like to watch the flying
                                            demonstrations. Somebody can grab a camcorder and make a presentation on
                                            one of their collections, dub some computer music on it, add some title
                                            overlays--viola. I do this for our robot club too. Being a non-profit,
                                            you can most likely get permission to use the hours of
                                            documentaries(even movies perhaps) available to include in the
                                            multimedia presentations.

                                            In the short time of looking for local history here, I found this so
                                            far- not sur eif it's helpful.
                                            UNIVAC in Pittsburgh 1953-1963
                                            http://tinyurl.com/zl4cg
                                            NSFNET - 1985, move from ARPANET creates modern Internet,
                                            supercomputers linked at Univ of Pittsburgh
                                            http://tinyurl.com/g6tf5

                                            I wish I was living back there again, you'd find me down there almost
                                            every weekend--except during a football game.

                                            =Dan

                                            .==============================================================================.
                                            [ My Corner of Cyberspace -need hot sauce- http://ragooman.home.comcast.net/ ]
                                            [ Pittsburgh Robotics Society Got Robot? http://www.pghrobotics.org/ ]
                                            [ Pgh Vintage Comp.Society http://tinyurl.com/log8m ]
                                            .==============================================================================.



                                            Evan Koblentz wrote:
                                            >
                                            > I changed the subject line to reflect the current discussion topic.
                                            >
                                            > Let's limit the timeline to the mid-Atlantic and (lower) Northeast.
                                            > That is our core; we're not the "east half of the U.S. vintage
                                            > computer club". :)
                                            >
                                            > So, even though we have a stray member or two in North Carolina and
                                            > California, our timeline should include anything that happened from
                                            > Boston to Pittsburgh to D.C. .... I see that triangle as our constituency.
                                            >
                                            > Luckily, it leaves a plethora of historic activity to include. (Bryan
                                            > must be so happy reading this because I said "plethora".) Boston
                                            > gives us anything and everything associated with M.I.T. and the
                                            > minicomputer revolution. Pittsburgh gives us, well, whatever Dan R.
                                            > tells us happened out there at Carnegie Mellon. D.C. gives us the
                                            > whole freaking ARPAnet and military. Inside, we've got ENIAC and
                                            > UNIVAC from Philly, AT&T & Casio & RCA & Sony from here in New Jersey,
                                            > Commodore from the Pennsylvania 'burbs, and there's a tiny little
                                            > start-up in New York that some of you might have heard of called IBM.
                                            >
                                            > Did I forget anything big? Yes, and so we have more than enough to
                                            > cover in the timeline. Mike N.'s book "Collectible Microcomputers"
                                            > list anotheer dozen+ small companies in NJ alone that I never heard
                                            > of. And there was Franklin, Perkin-Elmer, TDL, EAI .... the list goes
                                            > on and on and on. We can probably get more help from the IEEE History
                                            > Center which is conveniently based at Rutgers. In addition, Fred
                                            > likes to remind me that either Mr. Hewlett or Mr. Packard (I always
                                            > forget which one!) worked at Camp Evans (a.k.a. the old Army name for
                                            > InfoAge), along with Howard Vollum who co-founded Tektronix.
                                            > (Although there is no relation between the guy named McAfee who was
                                            > one of the Marconi / Camp Evans big-wigs and the modern McAfee Corp.)
                                            >
                                            > Who else should we include? To help, I made a database in our Yahoo
                                            > Group called "Computer companies of the Mid-Atlantic and lower
                                            > Northeast" .... I seeded it with some of the basics; please add or
                                            > correct what's necessary. There is a lot still missing.
                                            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            > *From:* Jim Scheef [mailto:jscheef@...]
                                            > *Sent:* Friday, September 15, 2006 11:58 AM
                                            > *To:* midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                            > *Subject:* Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for!
                                            > MARCH museum exhibit ideas...
                                            >
                                            > Bob,
                                            >
                                            > Good idea! Don't forget all the AT&T / UNIX developements that took
                                            > place just down the road. Timeline events need not be limited to
                                            > products. The breakup of AT&T enabled them to attempt to compete in
                                            > the computer markplace. I think DEC should be included as well as IBM,
                                            > Data General, etc. Think of the "east" as east of the Mississippi and
                                            > Ohio Scientific comes in along with Heath/Zenith. We should include
                                            > all these companies.
                                            >
                                            > Jim
                                            >
                                            > ----- Original Message ----
                                            > From: Bob Applegate <bob@...>
                                            > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                            > Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 10:03:48 AM
                                            > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for!
                                            > MARCH museum exhibit ideas...
                                            >
                                            > Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented? The history of
                                            > California computer
                                            > companies are pretty well documented. It would certainly be worth
                                            > mentioning major
                                            > milestones in the computer history, but not a lot of details for
                                            > things not local. BTW,
                                            > don't forget that local computing history goes back to ENIAC, so that
                                            > 60' of wall space
                                            > can be sucked up pretty quickly!
                                            >
                                            > So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and
                                            > accomplishments?
                                            >
                                            > * Eniac at Upenn
                                            > * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                            > * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                            > * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                            > * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                            > * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                            > * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                            >
                                            > There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head.
                                            >
                                            > There was talk at one point about some PE/Interdata machines that
                                            > needed looking
                                            > at. Are they still there? I'll try to make a work session to have a
                                            > look at them and
                                            > see if we can get something fired up.
                                            >
                                            > One other note... once again, I'll add my concern about carpet and
                                            > antique computers.
                                            > I got yet another box of vintage computer boards that were wrapped in
                                            > plastic bags...
                                            > AHHHHHH!!!! 99% of the people handling PC boards don't understand
                                            > about static,
                                            > yet it can destroy things so easily.
                                            >
                                            > Carpet is a BAD THING in any display area where people can come in
                                            > contact with
                                            > the equipment. As nice as it is to walk on, you don't find carpet in
                                            > computer rooms
                                            > nor ESD work areas for a good reason. There are lots of people
                                            > walking through, but
                                            > those systems aren't being made any more... they deserve some
                                            > consideration.
                                            >
                                            > Bob
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > ----- Original Message -----
                                            > *From:* Evan Koblentz <mailto:evan@...>
                                            > *To:* midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                                            > <mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
                                            > *Sent:* Friday, September 15, 2006 9:10 AM
                                            > *Subject:* RE: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting
                                            > for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...
                                            >
                                            > >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our
                                            > museum to computers made on the right coast.
                                            >
                                            > Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the
                                            > first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                                            >
                                            > >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a
                                            > project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge.
                                            >
                                            > That would be too small. We have a LOT of wall space. I haven't
                                            > measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on
                                            > our side of the hallway. But maybe we could paint a section of
                                            > the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper! It would be
                                            > tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to
                                            > get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.
                                            > Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline
                                            > in order to determine how much space is needed. We could probably
                                            > borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the
                                            > Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in
                                            > Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                                            >
                                            > Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning,
                                            > basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed. So there will
                                            > be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we
                                            > can do the really FUN work. Meanwhile I am profusely happy that
                                            > we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                            >
                                            > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                            > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                            > Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.4/448 - Release Date: 9/14/2006
                                            >
                                          • Evan Koblentz
                                            Dan, thanks for your input about the exhibits and Pittsburgh history. We can t really avoid using the regular carpet. It s the cheapest, easiest, fastest way
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Sep 16, 2006
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Dan, thanks for your input about the exhibits and Pittsburgh history.

                                              We can't really avoid using the regular carpet. It's the cheapest, easiest,
                                              fastest way to make the rooms look halfway decent. What we can do is lay a
                                              pathway of some kind of anti-static or rubberized material. That will also
                                              help to make people follow the exhibit-browsing path that we prefer. We'll
                                              definitely put up some ropes, etc. as well. Demos are great but they need
                                              to be conducted only with our supervision.

                                              -----Original Message-----
                                              From: Dan [mailto:ragooman@...]
                                              Sent: Saturday, September 16, 2006 11:30 AM
                                              To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                              Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Computer companies of the northeast &
                                              mid-atlantic

                                              (warning, burst of ascii data commencing...)

                                              Even though I'm in Pittsburgh, I still have long ties to the east coast too
                                              (Long Island). Relative to the east coast, I'm sort of in the boonies here
                                              (for computers that is). If it were robotics, then it's a different story.
                                              There's couple of links the I quickly found, but not sure if it's useful. I
                                              volunteer at the Science Center here so I picked up a few things while
                                              hacking around there.

                                              The Timeline is a good idea for that 60' wall you mentioned --get a good
                                              artist/designer(college intern--work for food)-- the content helps but the
                                              look helps too. I just think it's in bad taste to make it a east coast vs
                                              west coast thing, sounds like another Rapper convention.
                                              Highlighting the local innovations within the Timeline is always more
                                              appealing -- 'hey look what we did here...'

                                              About the carpets, it is bad, unless you get anti-static carpet ($$$) -- but
                                              also, the attendees shouldn't man handle the equipment either. That might be
                                              fine for a children's museum, the exhibits ought to have some kind of
                                              barrier -- roped off, plexiglas covers, signs--'please do not
                                              touch(sensitive devices)', etc.

                                              Just a quick comment about the multimedia, there's some mention of an ascii
                                              terminal server to display the relevant historical info. I volunteer at our
                                              Science Center here and notice the the multimedia presentation makes a big
                                              difference. Maybe an updated server that contains visual multimedia is more
                                              appealing--alot of us like watching the History chan--appeal to the masses.
                                              I visit airshows, not only cause I worked on that stuff, but people like to
                                              watch the flying demonstrations. Somebody can grab a camcorder and make a
                                              presentation on one of their collections, dub some computer music on it, add
                                              some title overlays--viola. I do this for our robot club too. Being a
                                              non-profit, you can most likely get permission to use the hours of
                                              documentaries(even movies perhaps) available to include in the multimedia
                                              presentations.

                                              In the short time of looking for local history here, I found this so
                                              far- not sur eif it's helpful.
                                              UNIVAC in Pittsburgh 1953-1963
                                              http://tinyurl.com/zl4cg
                                              NSFNET - 1985, move from ARPANET creates modern Internet, supercomputers
                                              linked at Univ of Pittsburgh
                                              http://tinyurl.com/g6tf5

                                              I wish I was living back there again, you'd find me down there almost every
                                              weekend--except during a football game.

                                              =Dan

                                              .===========================================================================
                                              ===.
                                              [ My Corner of Cyberspace -need hot sauce-
                                              http://ragooman.home.comcast.net/ ]
                                              [ Pittsburgh Robotics Society Got Robot? http://www.pghrobotics.org/
                                              ]
                                              [ Pgh Vintage Comp.Society http://tinyurl.com/log8m
                                              ]
                                              .===========================================================================
                                              ===.



                                              Evan Koblentz wrote:
                                              >
                                              > I changed the subject line to reflect the current discussion topic.
                                              >
                                              > Let's limit the timeline to the mid-Atlantic and (lower) Northeast.
                                              > That is our core; we're not the "east half of the U.S. vintage
                                              > computer club". :)
                                              >
                                              > So, even though we have a stray member or two in North Carolina and
                                              > California, our timeline should include anything that happened from
                                              > Boston to Pittsburgh to D.C. .... I see that triangle as our constituency.
                                              >
                                              > Luckily, it leaves a plethora of historic activity to include. (Bryan
                                              > must be so happy reading this because I said "plethora".) Boston
                                              > gives us anything and everything associated with M.I.T. and the
                                              > minicomputer revolution. Pittsburgh gives us, well, whatever Dan R.
                                              > tells us happened out there at Carnegie Mellon. D.C. gives us the
                                              > whole freaking ARPAnet and military. Inside, we've got ENIAC and
                                              > UNIVAC from Philly, AT&T & Casio & RCA & Sony from here in New Jersey,
                                              > Commodore from the Pennsylvania 'burbs, and there's a tiny little
                                              > start-up in New York that some of you might have heard of called IBM.
                                              >
                                              > Did I forget anything big? Yes, and so we have more than enough to
                                              > cover in the timeline. Mike N.'s book "Collectible Microcomputers"
                                              > list anotheer dozen+ small companies in NJ alone that I never heard
                                              > of. And there was Franklin, Perkin-Elmer, TDL, EAI .... the list goes
                                              > on and on and on. We can probably get more help from the IEEE History
                                              > Center which is conveniently based at Rutgers. In addition, Fred
                                              > likes to remind me that either Mr. Hewlett or Mr. Packard (I always
                                              > forget which one!) worked at Camp Evans (a.k.a. the old Army name for
                                              > InfoAge), along with Howard Vollum who co-founded Tektronix.
                                              > (Although there is no relation between the guy named McAfee who was
                                              > one of the Marconi / Camp Evans big-wigs and the modern McAfee Corp.)
                                              >
                                              > Who else should we include? To help, I made a database in our Yahoo
                                              > Group called "Computer companies of the Mid-Atlantic and lower
                                              > Northeast" .... I seeded it with some of the basics; please add or
                                              > correct what's necessary. There is a lot still missing.
                                              > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              > --
                                              > *From:* Jim Scheef [mailto:jscheef@...]
                                              > *Sent:* Friday, September 15, 2006 11:58 AM
                                              > *To:* midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                              > *Subject:* Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for!
                                              > MARCH museum exhibit ideas...
                                              >
                                              > Bob,
                                              >
                                              > Good idea! Don't forget all the AT&T / UNIX developements that took
                                              > place just down the road. Timeline events need not be limited to
                                              > products. The breakup of AT&T enabled them to attempt to compete in
                                              > the computer markplace. I think DEC should be included as well as IBM,
                                              > Data General, etc. Think of the "east" as east of the Mississippi and
                                              > Ohio Scientific comes in along with Heath/Zenith. We should include
                                              > all these companies.
                                              >
                                              > Jim
                                              >
                                              > ----- Original Message ----
                                              > From: Bob Applegate <bob@...>
                                              > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                              > Sent: Friday, September 15, 2006 10:03:48 AM
                                              > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting for!
                                              > MARCH museum exhibit ideas...
                                              >
                                              > Maybe make the timeline east-coast oriented? The history of
                                              > California computer companies are pretty well documented. It would
                                              > certainly be worth mentioning major milestones in the computer
                                              > history, but not a lot of details for things not local. BTW, don't
                                              > forget that local computing history goes back to ENIAC, so that 60' of
                                              > wall space can be sucked up pretty quickly!
                                              >
                                              > So what were the noteworthy east-coast computer companies and
                                              > accomplishments?
                                              >
                                              > * Eniac at Upenn
                                              > * DEC - although this might be a little too far north for our interest
                                              > * Perkin-Elmer/ Interdata - minicomputers made in NJ
                                              > * MOS Technology - creators of the 6502
                                              > * Commodore - lots of history there!
                                              > * TDL in Trenton - first Z80 S-100 card.
                                              > * Franklin Computer - first Apple clone
                                              >
                                              > There are probably dozens more, but that's just off the top of my head.
                                              >
                                              > There was talk at one point about some PE/Interdata machines that
                                              > needed looking at. Are they still there? I'll try to make a work
                                              > session to have a look at them and see if we can get something fired
                                              > up.
                                              >
                                              > One other note... once again, I'll add my concern about carpet and
                                              > antique computers.
                                              > I got yet another box of vintage computer boards that were wrapped in
                                              > plastic bags...
                                              > AHHHHHH!!!! 99% of the people handling PC boards don't understand
                                              > about static, yet it can destroy things so easily.
                                              >
                                              > Carpet is a BAD THING in any display area where people can come in
                                              > contact with the equipment. As nice as it is to walk on, you don't
                                              > find carpet in computer rooms nor ESD work areas for a good reason.
                                              > There are lots of people walking through, but those systems aren't
                                              > being made any more... they deserve some consideration.
                                              >
                                              > Bob
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > ----- Original Message -----
                                              > *From:* Evan Koblentz <mailto:evan@...>
                                              > *To:* midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                                              > <mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
                                              > *Sent:* Friday, September 15, 2006 9:10 AM
                                              > *Subject:* RE: [midatlanticretro] The email you've been waiting
                                              > for! MARCH museum exhibit ideas...
                                              >
                                              > >>>> I think it would be wonderful and appropriate to orient our
                                              > museum to computers made on the right coast.
                                              >
                                              > Well I'm thinking about just one exhibit, probably one of the
                                              > first exhibits that we build, but not the whole museum.
                                              >
                                              > >>>> A timeline printed on fan-fold green-bar paper might be a
                                              > project someone could do at home and bring to InfoAge.
                                              >
                                              > That would be too small. We have a LOT of wall space. I haven't
                                              > measured it, but I'm estimating that we have at least 60 feet on
                                              > our side of the hallway. But maybe we could paint a section of
                                              > the wall to be a huge sheet of greenbar paper! It would be
                                              > tedious to get all of the proportions correct, and challenging to
                                              > get the perfect shade of greenish-blue, but it sure would be fun.
                                              > Of course first we'd have to decide what belongs on the timeline
                                              > in order to determine how much space is needed. We could probably
                                              > borrow the data from an existing timeline from a place like the
                                              > Computer History Museum (that's the one where VCF is held out in
                                              > Silicon Valley; the staff there are all nice people.)
                                              >
                                              > Most timely however, we can't forget that plenty of cleaning,
                                              > basic painting, and carpet-laying is still needed. So there will
                                              > be another (at least) three or four laborious workdays before we
                                              > can do the really FUN work. Meanwhile I am profusely happy that
                                              > we're getting close enough to see the finish line .... you know?
                                              >
                                              >
                                              >
                                              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                              >
                                              > No virus found in this incoming message.
                                              > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                                              > Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.12.4/448 - Release Date: 9/14/2006
                                              >



                                              Yahoo! Groups Links
                                            • Dan
                                              Evan, I meant to say that you can make your own video presentations of the demos for the museum. That way it can play repeatedly while the museum is open. Just
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Sep 17, 2006
                                              • 0 Attachment
                                                Evan,

                                                I meant to say that you can make your own video presentations of the
                                                demos for the museum. That way it can play repeatedly while the museum
                                                is open. Just some home videos on a ordinary DV Camcorder(and good
                                                lighting) and simple editing (Windows movie maker)- ala History Chan @
                                                InfoAge. I'm sure there would be enough volunteers there to participate
                                                in the videos-- almost like a VCF on TV. Just need someone to post edit
                                                all the video ( a big HD on their PC), that takes time. Then you can get
                                                some ol' PCs mounted in some kind display stand( some plywood n painted)
                                                beside the exhibit connected on a network playing the videos from the
                                                server.

                                                =Dan

                                                My Corner of Cyberspace - http://ragooman.home.comcast.net/
                                                Pittsburgh Robotics Society - http://www.pghrobotics.org/
                                                Pgh Vintage Comp.Society - http://tinyurl.com/log8m




                                                Evan Koblentz wrote:
                                                >
                                                > Dan, thanks for your input about the exhibits and Pittsburgh history.
                                                >
                                                > We can't really avoid using the regular carpet. It's the cheapest,
                                                > easiest,
                                                > fastest way to make the rooms look halfway decent. What we can do is lay a
                                                > pathway of some kind of anti-static or rubberized material. That will also
                                                > help to make people follow the exhibit-browsing path that we prefer. We'll
                                                > definitely put up some ropes, etc. as well. Demos are great but they need
                                                > to be conducted only with our supervision.
                                                >
                                                >
                                              • Bob Grieb
                                                Guys, A friend sent me this. I have not confirmed it yet, but do plan to attend: Saturday Sept 30th at 2:00pm Steve Wozniak will speak at the Central library
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Sep 18, 2006
                                                • 0 Attachment
                                                  Guys,

                                                  A friend sent me this. I have not confirmed it yet, but do plan to
                                                  attend:

                                                  Saturday Sept 30th at 2:00pm Steve Wozniak will speak at the
                                                  Central library in Phila. It's a free author event. His topic: From
                                                  Computer Geek to Cult Icon:How I Invented the Personal
                                                  Computer,Co-founded Apple, and Had Fun Doing It. No tickets or
                                                  reservations necessary. For more info: library.phila.gov

                                                  Bob Grieb



                                                  __________________________________________________
                                                  Do You Yahoo!?
                                                  Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                                  http://mail.yahoo.com
                                                • B. Degnan
                                                  whoa! I will try to go. bd
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Sep 18, 2006
                                                  • 0 Attachment
                                                    whoa! I will try to go.
                                                    bd

                                                    At 05:38 PM 9/18/2006 -0700, you wrote:
                                                    > Guys,
                                                    >
                                                    > A friend sent me this. I have not confirmed it yet, but do plan to
                                                    >attend:
                                                    >
                                                    > Saturday Sept 30th at 2:00pm Steve Wozniak will speak at the
                                                    >Central library in Phila. It's a free author event. His topic: From
                                                    >Computer Geek to Cult Icon:How I Invented the Personal
                                                    >Computer,Co-founded Apple, and Had Fun Doing It. No tickets or
                                                    >reservations necessary. For more info: library.phila.gov
                                                    >
                                                    > Bob Grieb
                                                  • Evan Koblentz
                                                    That s not quite his topic -- it s the title of his autobiography that gets released next week. As much as I bow before The Woz, in this case he s just
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Sep 18, 2006
                                                    • 0 Attachment
                                                      That's not quite his "topic" -- it's the title of his autobiography that
                                                      gets released next week. As much as I bow before The Woz, in this case he's
                                                      just hawking books.

                                                      I'm sure he will still have wild stories, if there are any left that he
                                                      hasn't already told.

                                                      -----Original Message-----
                                                      From: Bob Grieb [mailto:bobgrieb@...]
                                                      Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 8:39 PM
                                                      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                      Subject: [midatlanticretro] The Woz

                                                      Guys,

                                                      A friend sent me this. I have not confirmed it yet, but do plan to
                                                      attend:

                                                      Saturday Sept 30th at 2:00pm Steve Wozniak will speak at the Central
                                                      library in Phila. It's a free author event. His topic: From Computer Geek to
                                                      Cult Icon:How I Invented the Personal Computer,Co-founded Apple, and Had Fun
                                                      Doing It. No tickets or reservations necessary. For more info:
                                                      library.phila.gov

                                                      Bob Grieb



                                                      __________________________________________________
                                                      Do You Yahoo!?
                                                      Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                                      http://mail.yahoo.com



                                                      Yahoo! Groups Links
                                                    • Jim Scheef
                                                      Evan, I m sure he will tell stories that are in his book! I would go and buy a book so he could sign it. Jim ... From: Evan Koblentz To:
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Sep 18, 2006
                                                      • 0 Attachment
                                                        Evan,

                                                        I'm sure he will tell stories that are in his book! I would go and buy a book so he could sign it.

                                                        Jim

                                                        ----- Original Message ----
                                                        From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
                                                        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                        Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 9:06:40 PM
                                                        Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The Woz

                                                        That's not quite his "topic" -- it's the title of his autobiography that
                                                        gets released next week. As much as I bow before The Woz, in this case he's
                                                        just hawking books.

                                                        I'm sure he will still have wild stories, if there are any left that he
                                                        hasn't already told.

                                                        -----Original Message-----
                                                        From: Bob Grieb [mailto:bobgrieb@yahoo. com]
                                                        Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 8:39 PM
                                                        To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                                                        Subject: [midatlanticretro] The Woz

                                                        Guys,

                                                        A friend sent me this. I have not confirmed it yet, but do plan to
                                                        attend:

                                                        Saturday Sept 30th at 2:00pm Steve Wozniak will speak at the Central
                                                        library in Phila. It's a free author event. His topic: From Computer Geek to
                                                        Cult Icon:How I Invented the Personal Computer,Co- founded Apple, and Had Fun
                                                        Doing It. No tickets or reservations necessary. For more info:
                                                        library.phila. gov

                                                        Bob Grieb

                                                        ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                                                        Do You Yahoo!?
                                                        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                                        http://mail. yahoo.com

                                                        Yahoo! Groups Links


                                                      • Jim Scheef
                                                        Dan, This is such a fabulous idea I can t believe I hadn t thought of it yet! ;-^) Video allows us to cram a lot of action into a small space and at little
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Sep 19, 2006
                                                        • 0 Attachment
                                                          Dan,

                                                          This is such a fabulous idea I can't believe I hadn't thought of it yet! ;-^) Video allows us to cram a lot of action into a small space and at little incremental cost. The videos need not be recorded at InfoAge, so they could include items too large to move from private collections. Other thoughts?

                                                          Jim

                                                          ----- Original Message ----
                                                          From: Dan <ragooman@...>
                                                          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                          Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2006 1:07:07 PM
                                                          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Computer companies of the northeast & mid-atlantic

                                                          Evan,

                                                          I meant to say that you can make your own video presentations of the
                                                          demos for the museum. That way it can play repeatedly while the museum
                                                          is open. Just some home videos on a ordinary DV Camcorder(and good
                                                          lighting) and simple editing (Windows movie maker)- ala History Chan @
                                                          InfoAge. I'm sure there would be enough volunteers there to participate
                                                          in the videos-- almost like a VCF on TV. Just need someone to post edit
                                                          all the video ( a big HD on their PC), that takes time. Then you can get
                                                          some ol' PCs mounted in some kind display stand( some plywood n painted)
                                                          beside the exhibit connected on a network playing the videos from the
                                                          server.

                                                          =Dan

                                                          My Corner of Cyberspace - http://ragooman. home.comcast. net/
                                                          Pittsburgh Robotics Society - http://www.pghrobot ics.org/
                                                          Pgh Vintage Comp.Society - http://tinyurl. com/log8m

                                                          Evan Koblentz wrote:

                                                          >
                                                          > Dan, thanks for your input about the exhibits and Pittsburgh history.
                                                          >
                                                          > We can't really avoid using the regular carpet. It's the cheapest,
                                                          > easiest,
                                                          > fastest way to make the rooms look halfway decent. What we can do is lay a
                                                          > pathway of some kind of anti-static or rubberized material. That will also
                                                          > help to make people follow the exhibit-browsing path that we prefer. We'll
                                                          > definitely put up some ropes, etc. as well. Demos are great but they need
                                                          > to be conducted only with our supervision.
                                                          >
                                                          >


                                                        • Jeffrey Frady
                                                          I d love to go. But I d need to find a ride.
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Sep 19, 2006
                                                          • 0 Attachment
                                                            I'd love to go.  But I'd need to find a ride.

                                                            On 19/09/06, Jim Scheef <jscheef@...> wrote:

                                                            Evan,

                                                            I'm sure he will tell stories that are in his book! I would go and buy a book so he could sign it.

                                                            Jim


                                                            ----- Original Message ----
                                                            From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
                                                            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                            Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 9:06:40 PM
                                                            Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] The Woz

                                                            That's not quite his "topic" -- it's the title of his autobiography that
                                                            gets released next week. As much as I bow before The Woz, in this case he's
                                                            just hawking books.

                                                            I'm sure he will still have wild stories, if there are any left that he
                                                            hasn't already told.

                                                            -----Original Message-----
                                                            From: Bob Grieb [mailto:bobgrieb@yahoo. com]
                                                            Sent: Monday, September 18, 2006 8:39 PM
                                                            To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                                                            Subject: [midatlanticretro] The Woz

                                                            Guys,

                                                            A friend sent me this. I have not confirmed it yet, but do plan to
                                                            attend:

                                                            Saturday Sept 30th at 2:00pm Steve Wozniak will speak at the Central
                                                            library in Phila. It's a free author event. His topic: From Computer Geek to
                                                            Cult Icon:How I Invented the Personal Computer,Co- founded Apple, and Had Fun
                                                            Doing It. No tickets or reservations necessary. For more info:
                                                            library.phila. gov

                                                            Bob Grieb

                                                            ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __
                                                            Do You Yahoo!?
                                                            Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                                                            http://mail. yahoo.com

                                                            Yahoo! Groups Links



                                                          • B. Degnan
                                                            THis way persons who can t make it to info age can participate in the museum. bd
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Sep 19, 2006
                                                            • 0 Attachment
                                                              THis way persons who can't make it to info age can participate in the museum.
                                                              bd

                                                              At 02:01 PM 9/19/2006 -0700, you wrote:
                                                              >Dan,
                                                              >
                                                              >This is such a fabulous idea I can't believe I hadn't thought of it yet!
                                                              >;-^) Video allows us to cram a lot of action into a small space and at
                                                              >little incremental cost. The videos need not be recorded at InfoAge, so
                                                              >they could include items too large to move from private collections. Other
                                                              >thoughts?
                                                              >
                                                              >Jim
                                                              >
                                                              >----- Original Message ----
                                                              >From: Dan <ragooman@...>
                                                              >To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                                              >Sent: Sunday, September 17, 2006 1:07:07 PM
                                                              >Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Computer companies of the northeast &
                                                              >mid-atlantic
                                                              >
                                                              >Evan,
                                                              >
                                                              >I meant to say that you can make your own video presentations of the
                                                              >demos for the museum. That way it can play repeatedly while the museum
                                                              >is open. Just some home videos on a ordinary DV Camcorder(and good
                                                              >lighting) and simple editing (Windows movie maker)- ala History Chan @
                                                              >InfoAge. I'm sure there would be enough volunteers there to participate
                                                              >in the videos-- almost like a VCF on TV. Just need someone to post edit
                                                              >all the video ( a big HD on their PC), that takes time. Then you can get
                                                              >some ol' PCs mounted in some kind display stand( some plywood n painted)
                                                              >beside the exhibit connected on a network playing the videos from the
                                                              >server.
                                                              >
                                                              >=Dan
                                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.