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Re: [midatlanticretro] 25 best pc's of all time

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  • Dan
    Although there can be many more opinions than there are candidates for lists such as these, I sometimes like to recall pertinent bits of historical grandeur
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 13, 2006
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      Although there can be many more opinions than there are candidates for lists such as these, I sometimes like to recall pertinent bits of historical grandeur instead. I happen to like the Amiga 1000 as it happened to be lightyears ahead of the IBM PC, and the Apple Mac, it's intended competition.
      Here's a quaint old commercial of the Commodore 64 from back then (see link below) that really emphasizes the innovation, impact, industrial design, and intangibles, that PC World is apparently trying to detect. Some of you might have seen this already, but it's nice to look at it again. I like to collect these as I go along, something to add to the memories.
      BTW, it might be something to add to your new museum, having video monitors strategically placed around the facility playing back old commercials or documentaries,  as people stroll thru the hallways of the computer collection.

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7ZA4gNtqnk&mode=related&search=

      =Dan

      Bryan Pope wrote:

      B. Degnan wrote:
      > http://www.pcworld. com/article/ id,126692- page,14-c, systems/article. html
      >
      This is the *worst* *list* *ever*.. _sigh_... What the A1000 was
      better then the C64? OMG! Can we state the obvious?

      Cheers,

      Bryan
      > I am surprised to not find the Commodore 64 on the list (it was an
      > honorable mention), but nice article to read.
      >
      > Here is my top 10 list, for purely personal and unofficial reasons. Mostly
      > because these were the computers I used when they were "new"
      >
      > IBM 5150
      > Commodore B-128
      > Apple II GS
      > TRS 80 Model 1
      > Commodore 128
      > Commodore Pet 2001..4032
      > TI 99/4a
      > Amiga 2000
      > GRiD Lite (8088 processor model)
      > PS/2 Model 25
      >
      >
      I like your list a lot better.. :)


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    • Herb Johnson
      ... They mentioned NO CP/M systems and one S-100 system: namely the Altair 8800, and merely because it was a first . They say it was the first machine to
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 13, 2006
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        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "B. Degnan" <billdeg@...> wrote:
        >
        > http://www.pcworld.com/article/id,126692-page,14-c,systems/article.html
        >
        > I am surprised to not find the Commodore 64 on the list (it was an
        > honorable mention), but nice article to read.
        >
        > Bill D
        >

        They mentioned NO CP/M systems and one S-100 system: namely the
        Altair 8800, and merely because it was a "first". They say it was the
        "first machine to capture geek attention". This is a clumbsy way to
        say it was the first POPULAR personal computer, the first to be
        produced in reasonable quantity, and the first to catch on in a
        commercial sense.

        They mentioned the Osborne 1 as "near great". Sold ready to go, and
        portable (by that day's standards) AND for under $2000. That set the
        price point for many years. The SGI Indy, a system I've mentioned in
        this discussion group, was also in the "near great" list.

        I was going to post at PC World my own opinion about the Altair, but
        they wanted my email address and postal address. I don't need more
        marketing junk. So I'll post my comments here: I've had to answer this
        question before so I've got it pretty well stated:

        "The MITS Altair 8800 started two computer revolutions. Hardware was
        the first: its universal S-100 bus became supported by over ONE
        HUNDRED different computer manufacturers, and became an IEEE standard.
        The second was as a platform for Digital Research's CP/M: the
        "software bus" for the late 1970's and early 1980's which ran all
        major software of the day. In fact, MS-DOS was designed day-one to
        match CP/M 2.2 system calls. The open documentation standard set with
        CP/M and S-100 products obliged IBM to create their first
        openly-documented system: the IBM PC. Like the S-100 "clones" of the
        Altair, the IBM PC "clones" were the next revolution in computing."

        Interestingly enough, I've learned that Digital Research's CP/M may
        have had its first general sales in 1976: in a way this year may be
        the 30th anniversary of CP/M. I"ve not confirmed this yet. Can anyone
        look in BYTE magazines at and before 1976 for Digital Research ads?
        They'd be really tiny.

        HErb Johnson

        Herbert R. Johnson, New Jersey USA
        <a href="http://retrotechnology.com/herbs_stuff/"> web site</a>
        <a href="http://retrotechnology.net/herbs_stuff/"> domain mirror</a>
        my email address: hjohnson AAT retrotechnology DOTT com
        if no reply, try in a few days: herbjohnson ATT comcast DOTT net
        "Herb's Stuff": old Mac, SGI, 8-inch floppy drives
        S-100 IMSAI Altair computers, docs, by "Dr. S-100"
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