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MARCH has a working Lisa Keyboard

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  • corey986
    So after dropping the kids off at Lacrosse camp today, I went to InfoAge to install the new keyboard capacitive discharge foam in the MARCH Lisa keyboard so
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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      So after dropping the kids off at Lacrosse camp today, I went to InfoAge to install the new keyboard capacitive discharge foam in the MARCH Lisa keyboard so that it can be shown at HOPE 2014.


      It was mostly mindless work after spending some time perfecting the technique for making the foam inserts.  Previously I just bought them on line for my Sol-20's and for the MARCH Sol-20.


      So after experimenting with three different thickness clean plastic sheeting (.007, .015 and simple overhead projector).  The simple overhead projector plastic works best.


      Then experimenting with foam, my first trip to home depot they only had medium density or thicker foam insulation so I ordered some from amazon, but it didn't feel right.  Finally on another trip to a different home depot, I found wide low density 1/4" thick white foam.  It was perfect.


      next was the glue...  First I tried contact cement... no go... next spray adhesive (foam safe version).  


      And the Mylar was simply a space blanket from Walmart.


      A set of open punches was purchased from Harbor Freight also.


      So I sprayed the clear plastic with adhesive, and put the non sticky part of the foam down (saving the sticky part for the mylar)


      Using a round dowel, I rolled the mylar onto the foam (after removing the paper on the foam) to avoid as many wrinkles as possible,


      Then using the 7/16 open punch and an oak block underneath, I punch the foam out with the plastic towards the oak.  A couple of hits each till I was in the oak and we are good.


      Then I was able to use a dental pick to pop out the old foam inserts and replace them.


      Tested the keyboard and two keys didn't work.  Cracked it open and fixed two foams that weren't snapping in correctly with different foam inserts and perfect now...


      Cheers,

      Corey

    • Evan Koblentz
      ... That is awesome. I expect that we can have even more technical classes at VCFeX. Why not one on keyboard restoration?
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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        >> It was mostly mindless work after spending some time perfecting the technique for making the foam inserts. 

        That is awesome.

        I expect that we can have even more technical classes at VCFeX. Why not one on keyboard restoration?
      • ian_primus
        ... You didn t like it when I brought the idea up for last VCF, since it only applies to a very small subset of vintage computers. Namely, Lisa, Sol-20,
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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          > I expect that we can have even more technical classes at VCFeX. Why 
          > not one on keyboard restoration?

          You didn't like it when I brought the idea up for last VCF, since it only applies to a very small subset of vintage computers. Namely, Lisa, Sol-20, Franklin Ace, and a couple of others. For VCFeX, are we going to really develop the technical classes further, with more in-depth, machine specific workshops?

          Making the foam pads isn't hard, it's just tedious. Although, it would be funny to have a whole room of people making them at once - I use a single punch die that I hit with a mallet to punch them. A dozen people doing this at once would be hilarious ;)

          Don't get me wrong, I think it's a good idea, it's something that several people can probably benefit from - but I don't know about the general VCF going public, if you're going for broader reaching topics.

          Or, maybe at the next Workshop Weekend at InfoAge. Corey and I can definitely teach people how to hit foam with a hammer.

          -Ian
        • Evan Koblentz
          ... At 9.1 we had limited space. At X we may have more space -- I just found that out a couple of days ago. A classroom may be available in the first
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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            >> You didn't like it when I brought the idea up for last VCF, since it only applies to a very small subset of vintage computers. Namely, Lisa, Sol-20, Franklin Ace, and a couple of others. For VCFeX, are we going to really develop the technical classes further, with more in-depth, machine specific workshops?

            At 9.1 we had limited space. At X we may have more space -- I just found that out a couple of days ago. A classroom may be available in the first H-building. Also we may be able to have an inside wall in the tent. Either of those options would mean we can have more classes and/or longer classes and/or more niche classes.
          • billdeg
            don t forget all of the Tandy and Visual computers that benefit from this technique (previously discussed on Mike Loewen and my web site). I say put it down
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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              don't forget all of the Tandy and Visual computers that benefit from this technique (previously discussed on Mike Loewen and my web site).  I say "put it down as a candidate" save in the maybe pile.  Along those lines "keyboard restoration" might be broad enough of a topic.  One could include the foam pad restoration and other forms of mechanical restoration in one class.
              bd
            • DuaneCraps
              Corey, It would make a good u-tube video. Then we could point to it whenever anyone had the problem. D From: corey986 Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 4:16 PM To:
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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                Corey,
                 
                It would make a good u-tube video. Then we could point to it whenever anyone had the problem.
                 
                D
                 
                From: corey986
                Sent: Tuesday, July 08, 2014 4:16 PM
                Subject: [midatlanticretro] MARCH has a working Lisa Keyboard
                 
                 

                So after dropping the kids off at Lacrosse camp today, I went to InfoAge to install the new keyboard capacitive discharge foam in the MARCH Lisa keyboard so that it can be shown at HOPE 2014.


                It was mostly mindless work after spending some time perfecting the technique for making the foam inserts.  Previously I just bought them on line for my Sol-20's and for the MARCH Sol-20.


                So after experimenting with three different thickness clean plastic sheeting (.007, .015 and simple overhead projector).  The simple overhead projector plastic works best.


                Then experimenting with foam, my first trip to home depot they only had medium density or thicker foam insulation so I ordered some from amazon, but it didn't feel right.  Finally on another trip to a different home depot, I found wide low density 1/4" thick white foam.  It was perfect.


                next was the glue...  First I tried contact cement... no go... next spray adhesive (foam safe version). 


                And the Mylar was simply a space blanket from Walmart.

                 

                A set of open punches was purchased from Harbor Freight also.

                 

                So I sprayed the clear plastic with adhesive, and put the non sticky part of the foam down (saving the sticky part for the mylar)

                 

                Using a round dowel, I rolled the mylar onto the foam (after removing the paper on the foam) to avoid as many wrinkles as possible,

                 

                Then using the 7/16 open punch and an oak block underneath, I punch the foam out with the plastic towards the oak.  A couple of hits each till I was in the oak and we are good.

                 

                Then I was able to use a dental pick to pop out the old foam inserts and replace them.

                 

                Tested the keyboard and two keys didn't work.  Cracked it open and fixed two foams that weren't snapping in correctly with different foam inserts and perfect now...

                 

                Cheers,

                Corey

              • Matt Patoray
                ... I can imagine it would be something like the scene from the producers, with all the accountants at Whitehall and Marx grinding on there mechanical adding
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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                  > On Jul 8, 2014, at 5:30 PM, "ian_primus@... [midatlanticretro]" <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Making the foam pads isn't hard, it's just tedious. Although, it would be funny to have a whole room of people making them at once - I use a single punch die that I hit with a mallet to punch them. A dozen people doing this at once would be hilarious ;)

                  I can imagine it would be something like the scene from the producers, with all the accountants at Whitehall and Marx grinding on there mechanical adding machines all in unison.

                  Matt
                • corey986
                  One more thing about assembly I have to add... The mylar has two sides. One is conductive and one isn t. The non-conductive side faces the keypads, the
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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                    One more thing about assembly I have to add...

                       The mylar has two sides.  One is conductive and one isn't.  The non-conductive side faces the keypads, the conductive side faces the foam.

                    The clear (I wrote clean above, pardon the typo) plastic sheet it doesn't matter which side.

                    Cheers,
                    Corey
                  • corey986
                    Duane, I have so many things I d love to make youtube videos about but never find enough time. I think the one I really want to make a video for is how to
                    Message 9 of 9 , Jul 8, 2014
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                      Duane,

                        I have so many things I'd love to make youtube videos about but never find enough time.  I think the one I really want to make a video for is how to replicate the splatter coat finish on computers when you repaint/repair cracked and damaged cases.

                      Cheers,
                      Corey
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