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RE: RE: Mid-Atlantic Altair CP/M

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  • jeff_s_jonas
    In 1982, Zilog Office Systems sold Z80 systems using DSDD 8 floppy drives as well as the Z8000 based System 8000 with one QIC drive and NO floppies. They
    Message 1 of 19 , Sep 25, 2013
      In 1982, Zilog Office Systems sold Z80 systems using DSDD 8" floppy drives as well as the Z8000 based System 8000 with one QIC drive and NO floppies. They linked together via serial ports, or Z-net (their version of Ethernet).

      Around 1984, I bought my Servo-8 6 MHz Z80 SBC (single board computer), I started with surplus 5.25" drives from a DEC Robin, but upgraded to DSDD 8" floppy drives (which were still over $100 on the surplus market).

      With 1k sectors, a DSDD 8" floppy holds 1.3 meg, but each mfgr used their own format (sector size, sector skew, etc.). SSSD IBM format was the only universal CP/M format for data interchange among makers.



      ---In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      I love this board!!!Great post!!!Anyway, I personally don't think they disappeared. I've have heard from another MARCH member who will remain nameless, that the IMSAI in WarGames was an "anachronism", and I didn't agree what that. That's why I made my original comment which Bill's screen shot confirmed my feelings on. Not that I wanted to go out of my way to prove this person wrong, it's just I remember s100 machines as a teenager but they didn't have any games that I wanted to play so I stuck with Apple. Then again I don't put anything past Hollywood, they had a MacBook destroy an entire alien invasion force with a virus, I guess when you have Jeff Goldblum you can survive dinosaurs and alien invasions.BTW: The only "1983" machine I remember still using 8" floppies was my dad's IBM system 36 or maybe it was 34. In 1983 as a teen I only remember 5 1/4 for home computers.Cheers, Corey
    • urrossum@att.net
      BTW: The only 1983 machine I remember still using 8 floppies was my dad s IBM system 36 or maybe it was 34. In 1983 as a teen I only remember 5 1/4 for
      Message 2 of 19 , Sep 26, 2013
        "BTW: The only "1983" machine I remember still using 8" floppies was my dad's IBM system 36 or maybe it was 34. In 1983 as a teen I only remember 5 1/4 for home computers."

        In 1983 (A bit older than a teen, but not too much - 24), I think there were still quite a few 8" systems around, although they were going away. *Mine* certainly had a pair - 8" SSSDs, plus *two* 5 megabyte Seagate drives. Wow - I had a real computer, it seemed to me.

        I still lusted after my friend's Cromemco System 3 chassis, though, with its voice-coil PerSci 8" floppy drives - really fast, though a bit trouble-prone.
        ~~
        Mark Moulding
      • Dave
        ... IBM used 8 disks all over. We had them on the terminal cluster controllers, as diagnostic disks on the IBM 3380 disks, on IBM Series/1 computers, and on
        Message 3 of 19 , Sep 26, 2013
          On 26/09/2013 08:34, urrossum@... wrote:
          > "BTW: The only "1983" machine I remember still using 8" floppies was my dad's IBM system 36 or maybe it was 34. In 1983 as a teen I only remember 5 1/4 for home computers."
          >
          > In 1983 (A bit older than a teen, but not too much - 24), I think there were still quite a few 8" systems around, although they were going away. *Mine* certainly had a pair - 8" SSSDs, plus *two* 5 megabyte Seagate drives. Wow - I had a real computer, it seemed to me.
          >
          > I still lusted after my friend's Cromemco System 3 chassis, though, with its voice-coil PerSci 8" floppy drives - really fast, though a bit trouble-prone.

          IBM used 8" disks all over. We had them on the terminal cluster
          controllers, as diagnostic disks on the IBM 3380 disks, on IBM Series/1
          computers, and on S/36, S/38 and AS/400.

          I also had an Motorola 6809 system at home with 8" disks. It had been
          developed for the UK Post Office I believe by Fortronic (now part of De
          La Rue) and ran Flex09. I wrote Ham Logging programs on it. The printer
          I had was really old, not sure where it came from. Sadly I no longer
          have the 6809. Apparently after dithering for a number of years the Post
          Office decided they actually wanted the system. By this time the 6809's
          were really obsolete and been stolen or borrowed for other projects, or
          like mine just loaned out. As they knew were mine was they came and
          repossessed it and I bought an Atari STE to replace it....

          > ~~
          > Mark Moulding
          >
          Dave
          G4UGM
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