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RE: Re: [midatlanticretro] SCSI ZIP Drive Question

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  • jeff_s_jonas
    How can one totally destroy a ZIP drive? Let me count the ways ... Despite the SCSI drives allegedly supporting the common command set, using the SCSI format
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 18, 2013
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      How can one totally destroy a ZIP drive? Let me count the ways ...

      Despite the SCSI drives allegedly supporting the common command set, using the SCSI "format" command renders the platters totally useless. You MUST use the iomega utilities!

      Perhaps I'm confusing the ZIP with the Jaz drives. The same precautions probably apply.

       



      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      
      I use DBAN to clean disks. It is a free download.
       
      Seems to work fine.
       
      BillDrom
       
    • s100doctor
      ... It s always a good idea to migrate data to new media and storage. No argument there. But that terrible reputation is undeserved and more myth than
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 28, 2013
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        I realize this thread on SCSI ZIP drives is a month old, but I read it recently and wanted to comment on the following:

        > Normally, I trust magnetic media for long term storage, but
        historically the vintage
        > Iomega Zip drive has had a terrible
        reputation; and its notorious, “Click of Death”
        >is legendary. So,
        I wanted to retrieve my data before it was too late.

        It's always a good idea to migrate data to new media and storage. No argument there. But that "terrible reputation" is undeserved and more myth than legend.

        ZIP 100MB disks go back to about the mid 1990's, so that's close to 20 years. That's a long time for one particular magnetic mass storage technology. ZIP 100 drives were available for SCSI, IDE (PATA), PC parallel port, and USB - that's unique for any magnetic mass storage technology. Imagine writing a ZIP diskette on a Mac SE and reading it on a Windows or Linux PC; other than the fact of a Mac vs Windows format - that's also unique. And until a few years ago, one could STILL buy ZIP 100 diskettes in office supply stores.

        I"ve bought and sold dozens of ZIP drives and read dozens of ZIP disks from several owners, over more than a decade. Most drives worked OK and most disks worked OK. The quote famous click-of-death unquote, was a consequence of a run of bad drives over a short period. Iomega was called to task for that and offered replacements. Also, the brand "ZIP Plus" drives apparently were less reliable. That's the only bad news I've seen on actual use of ZIP disks. They simply became superseded by writable CD drives.

        So I'd rank ZIP drives as more reliable and more usable across years and (personal computing) systems, than most any other magnetic media except floppy disks. I've noted they covered a lot of systems. Their prices were very competitive. Iomega built a good reputation around them. I don't entirely understand the retrospective bad press they receive, other than a tendency to discount old technology that simply runs its course but not make some company or person billions of dollars. That, and the period of bad drives during "the click of death" circumstance.

        Herb Johnson
        retrotechnology.com



        ---In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, <jeff_s_jonas@...> wrote:

        How can one totally destroy a ZIP drive? Let me count the ways ...

        Despite the SCSI drives allegedly supporting the common command set, using the SCSI "format" command renders the platters totally useless. You MUST use the iomega utilities!

        Perhaps I'm confusing the ZIP with the Jaz drives. The same precautions probably apply.

         



        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        
        I use DBAN to clean disks. It is a free download.
         
        Seems to work fine.
         
        BillDrom
         
      • Ray Sills
        HI Gang: Following up on Herb s observations on Zip disks: For a long time, we used Zip disks where I worked in a slightly unusual manner: There were used to
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 28, 2013
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          HI Gang:

          Following up on Herb's observations on Zip disks:

          For a long time, we used Zip disks where I worked in a slightly
          unusual manner: There were used to store audio recordings. A company
          called 360 Systems manufactured an audio recorder/player that took the
          place of what was the industry standard audio recording and playback
          device: the NAB audio cartridge. Audio "carts" are still used in some
          broadcast facilities to this day.

          But the 360 Systems Digicart offered many advantages: much longer
          recording time, ability to trim the start and end of the recording
          after the fact, and almost instant access to whatever was on the
          disk. The company originally used 44 mb removable disks, but went to
          the iomega Zip format soon on. The Zip disks could record in full
          bandwidth digital recording (48K sampling) or a data compressed mode,
          AC2 that reduced file size by a factor of about 4, with virtually
          indistinguishable quality from the original.

          The Zip disks were handy and often used to send important audio
          recordings, like "Theme Packages" to remote sites for use in a sports
          broadcast.

          The gist of it is that we almost -never- had any failures. And, once
          the disk was on site, the audio operator could transfer the content to
          an internal hard drive, if his Digicart had one (most did). It was a
          simple, easy to use, and reliable system.

          We also have some Jaz drives, which were used for temporary storage of
          audio tracks in an audio for video post production system. In this
          case, the Jaz would hold the dialog of an hour-long soap opera, as it
          was moved along in various stages of post production. After the
          episode was broadcast, the Jaz disk would be erased and used for a new
          episode.

          It was the case that we used the iomega formatting software to erase
          the disks. With the Digicarts however, the recorder itself could
          erase a disk, likely with licensed code from iomega.

          Bottom line: the Zip and Jaz disks did yeoman work, with few failures.

          73 de Ray
        • David Riley
          ... I generally tend to agree on Zip drives, especially the 100MB versions; they re very robust and reliable. Later ones (both drives and disks for 250MB and
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 28, 2013
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            On Oct 28, 2013, at 2:19 PM, Ray Sills wrote:

            > Bottom line: the Zip and Jaz disks did yeoman work, with few failures.

            I generally tend to agree on Zip drives, especially the 100MB
            versions; they're very robust and reliable. Later ones (both
            drives and disks for 250MB and 750MB variants) are somewhat
            less so, in my experience.

            However, I have TERRIBLE experiences with almost all Jaz
            media and drives I've worked with. They generally worked
            fine when new, but the drives were quite fragile and the
            disks seem to fail with age. I have about a dozen Jaz disks
            here which worked fine when they were last used about a
            decade ago. When I tried to fire them up again last year to
            use for some vintage work, NONE of them were usable and ALL
            failed "long format" across multiple drives. I have no
            working Jaz media at this point, though I don't actually
            know if it's the disks or the drives at fault.


            - Dave
          • Systems Glitch
            ... Same here. I don t think I have any cartridges or drives that remain functional. I used Bernoulli disks for a while in the late 90 s, since they were
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 28, 2013
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              > However, I have TERRIBLE experiences with almost all Jaz
              > media and drives I've worked with.

              Same here. I don't think I have any cartridges or drives that remain functional.

              I used Bernoulli disks for a while in the late 90's, since they were cheaply available as their previous owners replaced them with Zip disks/drives. I gave Zip disks a try when their prices came down due to prevalance of CD-R drives, but ended up going with SyQuest EZ-Drive 230 MB drives, which were more closely related to the Jaz drive in that they used hard disk platters.

              Of course, the king of old-but-reliable media has to be the Magneto-Optical disk. I use the 3.5" format, which comes in capacities up to 2.3 GB. Still use them for really important backups (taxes, medical records, et c.). I have a USB 2.0 attached 2.3 GB drive on my desk, which will read/write down to the original 128 MB cartridges. There's a mix of SCSI and IDE MO drives paired with several old machines, mostly SCSI drives with older Macs.

              Thanks,
              Jonathan
            • J. Alexander Jacocks
              ... Same here. I have Jaz drives (both 1 and 2GB versions), and carts, but none seem to work. My Zip carts, even those bought at random flea markets, work
              Message 6 of 16 , Oct 28, 2013
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                On Mon, Oct 28, 2013 at 5:21 PM, Systems Glitch <systems.glitch@...> wrote:
                 

                > However, I have TERRIBLE experiences with almost all Jaz
                > media and drives I've worked with.

                Same here. I don't think I have any cartridges or drives that remain functional.

                Same here.  I have Jaz drives (both 1 and 2GB versions), and carts, but none seem to work.  My Zip carts, even those bought at random flea markets, work great.  That goes for the 100s and the 250s.  I don't have any 750s.

                One useful thing that I have found is that if you have a zip cart that someone has formatted oddly, the drives will quite often refuse to read it.  However, for some reason, the parallel port zip drive, with the DOS zip tools, is fantastic at formatting those carts back to usefulness.  Complete accidental discovery.
                 
                Of course, the king of old-but-reliable media has to be the Magneto-Optical disk. I use the 3.5" format, which comes in capacities up to 2.3 GB. Still use them for really important backups (taxes, medical records, et c.). I have a USB 2.0 attached 2.3 GB drive on my desk, which will read/write down to the original 128 MB cartridges. There's a mix of SCSI and IDE MO drives paired with several old machines, mostly SCSI drives with older Macs.

                Interesting, as I just picked up one of the 2.3GB Fujitsu drives, at a Hamfest.  I remember them well, for years gone by, but I never had one, before.  I'll have to play with it, while media is still readily available.

                - Alex
              • jeff_s_jonas
                I was always suspicious of ZIP drives and somehow avoided them at home, work & school. A 1 gig USB drive got me thru my masters degree. At home I used full
                Message 7 of 16 , Oct 29, 2013
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                  I was always suspicious of ZIP drives and somehow avoided them at home, work & school. A 1 gig USB drive got me thru my masters' degree.


                  At home I used full size QIC tape drives for backups, then PD (phase-differential) 5.25" optical drives. And external SCSI hard drives.


                  I was given some 1 gig Jaz drives & cartridges but I think I ruined them by using the SCSI controller's low level formatting


                  Mac folks preferred Syquest drives and I salvaged a similar removable 5.25" hard drive cartridge from an AT&T phone system (Definity?) Long before that were 8" LARK removable cartridges and before that 14" platters in pizza cases or diskpacks up to 11 platters. Been there, done that.





                  ---In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                  On Mon, Oct 28, 2013 at 5:21 PM, Systems Glitch <systems.glitch@...> wrote:
                   
                  > However, I have TERRIBLE experiences with almost all Jaz
                  > media and drives I've worked with.

                  Same here. I don't think I have any cartridges or drives that remain functional.

                  Same here.  I have Jaz drives (both 1 and 2GB versions), and carts, but none seem to work.  My Zip carts, even those bought at random flea markets, work great.  That goes for the 100s and the 250s.  I don't have any 750s.

                  One useful thing that I have found is that if you have a zip cart that someone has formatted oddly, the drives will quite often refuse to read it.  However, for some reason, the parallel port zip drive, with the DOS zip tools, is fantastic at formatting those carts back to usefulness.  Complete accidental discovery.
                   
                  Of course, the king of old-but-reliable media has to be the Magneto-Optical disk. I use the 3.5" format, which comes in capacities up to 2.3 GB. Still use them for really important backups (taxes, medical records, et c.). I have a USB 2.0 attached 2.3 GB drive on my desk, which will read/write down to the original 128 MB cartridges. There's a mix of SCSI and IDE MO drives paired with several old machines, mostly SCSI drives with older Macs.

                  Interesting, as I just picked up one of the 2.3GB Fujitsu drives, at a Hamfest.  I remember them well, for years gone by, but I never had one, before.  I'll have to play with it, while media is still readily available.

                  - Alex
                • Dave McGuire
                  ... For me, the most reliable media have been, in decreasing order of reliability: - 9-track magtape - DEC RL01/RL02 - Floppy disks - Zip disks (100MB version
                  Message 8 of 16 , Oct 29, 2013
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                    On 10/29/2013 06:11 PM, jeff_s_jonas@... wrote:
                    > I was always suspicious of ZIP drives and somehow avoided them at home,
                    > work & school. A 1 gig USB drive got me thru my masters' degree.
                    >
                    >
                    > At home I used full size QIC tape drives for backups, then PD
                    > (phase-differential) 5.25" optical drives. And external SCSI hard drives.
                    >
                    >
                    > I was given some 1 gig Jaz drives & cartridges but I think I ruined them
                    > by using the SCSI controller's low level formatting
                    >
                    >
                    > Mac folks preferred Syquest drives and I salvaged a similar removable
                    > 5.25" hard drive cartridge from an AT&T phone system (Definity?) Long
                    > before that were 8" LARK removable cartridges and before that 14"
                    > platters in pizza cases or diskpacks up to 11 platters. Been there, done
                    > that.

                    For me, the most reliable media have been, in decreasing order of
                    reliability:

                    - 9-track magtape
                    - DEC RL01/RL02
                    - Floppy disks
                    - Zip disks (100MB version only)
                    - 8" and 5.25" Bernoulli (the nearly-identical predecessor of Zip)

                    -Dave

                    --
                    Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                    New Kensington, PA
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