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Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Idea for our Maker Faire exhibit

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  • Ray Sills
    ... That s the way a lot of kids operate: they push buttons, flip switches, and observe what happens. Eventually, (often quickly) they figure out what does
    Message 1 of 30 , Jun 13, 2013
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      On Jun 13, 2013, at 2:53 PM, Dave McGuire wrote:

      > On 06/13/2013 02:00 PM, Mike wrote:
      >> Kids like games, but I have noticed that the the more modern the game
      >> is, the better they like them. Color graphics and a joystick seem
      >> like the minimum baseline for most (but not all) kids.
      >
      > Just one data point here...My PDP-11/70 at VCF-E last year had a few
      > terminals running various text-based games. (and one just sitting at a
      > RSTS/E prompt, of course) Young kids, age 10 or so, took to those
      > games
      > like ducks to water. They'd never been exposed to that sort of thing
      > before, but they seemed to intuitively "get it". It was fascinating
      > to
      > watch their facial expressions as they figured it out, and then
      > started
      > playing.
      >
      > -Dave
      >
      > --
      > Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
      > New Kensington, PA

      That's the way a lot of kids operate: they push buttons, flip
      switches, and observe what happens. Eventually, (often quickly) they
      figure out what does what and are able to map that into their brains
      and begin serious usage. They simply are not intimidated by something
      "complex and difficult" to understand. You should see my 2 1/2 year
      old grandson navigate his way around my iPhone! Grownups, for
      whatever reason, seem to be afraid of "doing the wrong thing" and
      messing it up. Kids don't care.

      73 de Ray
    • Cory Smelosky
      ... I still solve problems that way. IÆm a /bit/ more cautious, but without that method of problem-solving, some of my problems would never get solved. ;) I
      Message 2 of 30 , Jun 13, 2013
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        On 13 Jun 2013, at 15:01, "Ray Sills" <raysills3@...> wrote:



        On Jun 13, 2013, at 2:53 PM, Dave McGuire wrote:

        On 06/13/2013 02:00 PM, Mike wrote:
        Kids like games, but I have noticed that the the more modern the game
        is, the better they like them.  Color graphics and a joystick seem
        like the minimum baseline for most (but not all) kids.

         Just one data point here...My PDP-11/70 at VCF-E last year had a few
        terminals running various text-based games. (and one just sitting at a
        RSTS/E prompt, of course)  Young kids, age 10 or so, took to those  
        games
        like ducks to water.  They'd never been exposed to that sort of thing
        before, but they seemed to intuitively "get it".  It was fascinating  
        to
        watch their facial expressions as they figured it out, and then  
        started
        playing.

                     -Dave

        -- 
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA

        That's the way a lot of kids operate:  they push buttons, flip  
        switches, and observe what happens.  Eventually, (often quickly) they  
        figure out what does what and are able to map that into their brains  
        and begin serious usage.  They simply are not intimidated by something  
        "complex and difficult" to understand.  You should see my 2 1/2 year  
        old grandson navigate his way around my iPhone!  Grownups, for  
        whatever reason, seem to be afraid of "doing the wrong thing" and  
        messing it up.  Kids don't care.

        I still solve problems that way.  I’m a /bit/ more cautious, but without that method of problem-solving, some of my problems would never get solved. ;)

        I got a broken I/O module to work in a Cisco 7200 by removing a burning transistor or resistor from the board through brute force once.  It made it (mostly) work believe it or not...


        73 de Ray






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      • Mike Loewen
        ... It s not just kids. Here s Alex Bodnar engrossed in Mystery Mansion on my HP 2109E:
        Message 3 of 30 , Jun 13, 2013
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          On Thu, 13 Jun 2013, Dave McGuire wrote:

          > On 06/13/2013 02:00 PM, Mike wrote:
          >> Kids like games, but I have noticed that the the more modern the game
          >> is, the better they like them. Color graphics and a joystick seem
          >> like the minimum baseline for most (but not all) kids.
          >
          > Just one data point here...My PDP-11/70 at VCF-E last year had a few
          > terminals running various text-based games. (and one just sitting at a
          > RSTS/E prompt, of course) Young kids, age 10 or so, took to those games
          > like ducks to water. They'd never been exposed to that sort of thing
          > before, but they seemed to intuitively "get it". It was fascinating to
          > watch their facial expressions as they figured it out, and then started
          > playing.

          It's not just kids. Here's Alex Bodnar engrossed in "Mystery Mansion"
          on my HP 2109E:

          http://www.flickr.com/photos/osr/7151170579/in/pool-810295@N25/lightbox/


          Mike Loewen mloewen@...
          Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
        • Mike
          What I m saying is that if you have two systems, each loaded with a game, one with color and joystick and the other with a monochrome text and a keyboard
          Message 4 of 30 , Jun 13, 2013
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            What I'm saying is that if you have two systems, each loaded with a game,
            one with color and joystick and the other with a monochrome text and a keyboard sitting side by side and a kid walks up, the vast majority of kids will gravitate towards one rather than the other.

            I know that there are games running in monochrome text mode that any literate person would enjoy.

            Regards,
            MIke W.

            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Loewen <mloewen@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Thu, 13 Jun 2013, Dave McGuire wrote:
            >
            > > On 06/13/2013 02:00 PM, Mike wrote:
            > >> Kids like games, but I have noticed that the the more modern the game
            > >> is, the better they like them. Color graphics and a joystick seem
            > >> like the minimum baseline for most (but not all) kids.
            > >
            > > Just one data point here...My PDP-11/70 at VCF-E last year had a few
            > > terminals running various text-based games. (and one just sitting at a
            > > RSTS/E prompt, of course) Young kids, age 10 or so, took to those games
            > > like ducks to water. They'd never been exposed to that sort of thing
            > > before, but they seemed to intuitively "get it". It was fascinating to
            > > watch their facial expressions as they figured it out, and then started
            > > playing.
            >
            > It's not just kids. Here's Alex Bodnar engrossed in "Mystery Mansion"
            > on my HP 2109E:
            >
            > http://www.flickr.com/photos/osr/7151170579/in/pool-810295@N25/lightbox/
            >
            >
            > Mike Loewen mloewen@...
            > Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
            >
          • Dave McGuire
            ... Oh yes, absolutely. ... Sure. I was just sharing what happened, as I was surprised by it. -Dave -- Dave McGuire, AK4HZ New Kensington, PA
            Message 5 of 30 , Jun 13, 2013
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              On 06/13/2013 05:44 PM, Mike wrote:
              > What I'm saying is that if you have two systems, each loaded with a game,
              > one with color and joystick and the other with a monochrome text and a keyboard sitting side by side and a kid walks up, the vast majority of kids will gravitate towards one rather than the other.

              Oh yes, absolutely.

              > I know that there are games running in monochrome text mode that any literate person would enjoy.

              Sure. I was just sharing what happened, as I was surprised by it.

              -Dave

              --
              Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
              New Kensington, PA
            • Dave McGuire
              ... -Dave -- Dave McGuire, AK4HZ New Kensington, PA
              Message 6 of 30 , Jun 13, 2013
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                On 06/13/2013 04:10 PM, Mike Loewen wrote:
                >>> Kids like games, but I have noticed that the the more modern the game
                >>> is, the better they like them. Color graphics and a joystick seem
                >>> like the minimum baseline for most (but not all) kids.
                >>
                >> Just one data point here...My PDP-11/70 at VCF-E last year had a few
                >> terminals running various text-based games. (and one just sitting at a
                >> RSTS/E prompt, of course) Young kids, age 10 or so, took to those games
                >> like ducks to water. They'd never been exposed to that sort of thing
                >> before, but they seemed to intuitively "get it". It was fascinating to
                >> watch their facial expressions as they figured it out, and then started
                >> playing.
                >
                > It's not just kids. Here's Alex Bodnar engrossed in "Mystery Mansion"
                > on my HP 2109E:
                >
                > http://www.flickr.com/photos/osr/7151170579/in/pool-810295@N25/lightbox/

                :-)

                -Dave

                --
                Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                New Kensington, PA
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