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Re: WD40 and printer ribbon

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  • s100doctor
    ... It s fortunate and likely no accident, that typewriters often used a limited number of ribbon spool types. And some desktop printers also used typewriter
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 10, 2013
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      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Jason Howe <jason@...> wrote:
      >
      > From my experience in the Vintage Typewriter world, two solutions exist.
      > 1) WD-40 the ribbons.
      > 2) Buy a new ribbon.

      It's fortunate and likely no accident, that typewriters often used a limited number of ribbon spool types. And some desktop printers also used typewriter ribbons, same reason.

      But there's a number of printers and printing terminals with odd ribbons that can't be purchased easily. So a ribbon-rehab solution is needed.

      Rich Cini, you mentioned finding some "formula" for reinking ink. Contact me privately with your findings, if you wish, and I'll add them to my Web site. Of course I encourage you to do the same. This is another example of "lost art" I'm trying to preserve.

      One other comment, from me in the antique sewing machine community. WD-40 is discouraged, because it leaves behind a residue - gunk - over years and decades. It's absolutely discouraged in the aircraft community for that reason.

      The solvent in WD-40 is kerosene - use that for cleaning. A comparable oil is "sewing machine oil", a clean product sold by Singer and many other brands, available wherever you get supplies for sewing. And yes, people STILL "sew", to make custom and better clothing, to repair, to quilt. There are more quilters than vintage computer collectors.

      Herb Johnson
      sew what?
      retrotechnology.com
    • Wesley Furr
      I recall some spirited discussion in a vintage camera forum with regards to WD-40. I believe the leaving behind of residue being an issue there as well...not
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 10, 2013
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        I recall some spirited discussion in a vintage camera forum with regards to
        WD-40. I believe the leaving behind of residue being an issue there as
        well...not to mention the lightweight fluid possibly going where it
        shouldn't (optics, etc). If you're flushing and cleaning out mechanical
        things, the camera folks really like Ronsonol (what most lighter fluids are
        made of)...it apparently dries up and doesn't leave any residue behind.
        Thanks for the tip on sewing machine oil...I'll have to add that to my
        arsenal.

        Wesley


        -----Original Message-----

        One other comment, from me in the antique sewing machine community. WD-40 is
        discouraged, because it leaves behind a residue - gunk - over years and
        decades. It's absolutely discouraged in the aircraft community for that
        reason.

        The solvent in WD-40 is kerosene - use that for cleaning. A comparable oil
        is "sewing machine oil", a clean product sold by Singer and many other
        brands, available wherever you get supplies for sewing. And yes, people
        STILL "sew", to make custom and better clothing, to repair, to quilt. There
        are more quilters than vintage computer collectors.

        Herb Johnson
        sew what?
        retrotechnology.com
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