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interesting advertisements of the past

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  • Cory Smelosky
    ... Who was it that released that ad? Now that I m thinking of advertisements...I ve been remidned of a DEC ad that was a conversation between a pdp-11 and I
    Message 1 of 1 , May 9, 2013
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      On Thu, 9 May 2013, Bob Schwier wrote:

      >
      >
      > If it has a handle and can be lifted onto a battleship with a forklift, it is portable.
      > At least that was the military definition.
      > Remember the ad with a pretty young thing holding a computer case like it was a cosmetics case from about 1970?  She was only lifting a conveniently empty case
      > as the real thing needed a weight lifter.
      > bs
      >

      Who was it that released that ad?

      Now that I'm thinking of advertisements...I've been remidned of a DEC ad
      that was a conversation between a pdp-11 and I can't remember what else.
      Anyone remember this ad? I can't even remember the magazine it was in...

      > --- On Thu, 5/9/13, Larry Schear <larry.schear@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Larry Schear <larry.schear@...>
      > Subject: FW: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
      > To: "midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com" <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
      > Date: Thursday, May 9, 2013, 11:26 AM
      >
      >  
      >
      > re-addressed
      >  
      >
      > _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
      > From: larry.schear@...
      > To: notify-dg-midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
      > Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 11:22:31 -0400
      >
      > Hi, Evan -
      >  
      > Early on, Claude kagan and I had an early "Portable" computer from Computer Communicaions, Inc. ("CCI"), somewhere in California.  It consisted of four pieces,
      > each of which was man-transportable: a Computer box (about 12" square x 2' long, with a handle on top), an Optical Keyboard (20 or so solid-state light sensors
      > detected light beams which were interrupted by mechanical shutters on each key (negatively affected by Claude's malamutes' dog hair, from operating on a shaggy
      > carpet in hos house)), a monochrome 14" (?) CRT Monitor (with a handle), and an Acoustic Coupler (110 baud) for a telephone handset.  Packaging was white/cream
      > with brown trim.  Used by the R.E.S.I.S.T.O.R.S. at an Atlantic City computer show, working from a telephopne booth, when all other communicaionms at the show
      > were offline!
      >  
      > I may have pictures somewhere.  Will forward them.
      >  
      > Larry Schear
      >  
      >
      > _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
      > Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 15:12:17 +0000
      > From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups
      > Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists Group
      > 6 New Messages
      >
      > Digest #3331
      > 1a
      > What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
      > 1b
      > Re: What's "portable" by "Dave McGuire" purringdave
      > 1c
      > Re: What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
      > 1d
      > Re: What's "portable" by "m" msimonsmail
      > 2a
      > Re: Anyone have a Northstar DOS 5 1/4 boot disk for a Sol or Cutter by "Systems Glitch" systems.glitch
      > 2b
      > Re: Anyone have a Northstar DOS 5 1/4 boot disk for a Sol or Cutter by "corey986" corey986
      >
      > Messages
      >
      > 1A
      >
      > WHAT'S "PORTABLE"
      >
      > Wed May 8, 2013 7:03 pm (PDT) . Posted by:
      >
      > "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
      >
      > >> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition of "portable" ;
      >
      > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of
      > these days I'll finish it...
      >
      > Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?
      >
      > According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops, because they're
      > meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many people did, but they're meant
      > to be stationary. However, included are truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made for mobility, despite being physically
      > massive.
      >
      > So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something that's
      > possible?
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (4) . Top ^
      >
      > 1B
      >
      > RE: WHAT'S "PORTABLE"
      >
      > Wed May 8, 2013 7:57 pm (PDT) . Posted by:
      >
      > "Dave McGuire" purringdave
      >
      > On 05/08/2013 10:03 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
      > >>> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition
      > >>> of "portable" ;
      > >
      > > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the
      > > evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10
      > > years and one of these days I'll finish it...
      > >
      > > Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?
      > >
      > > According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to
      > > be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops,
      > > because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be
      > > small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many
      > > people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are
      > > truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made
      > > for mobility, despite being physically massive.
      > >
      > > So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather
      > > is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something
      > > that's possible?
      >
      > I think this is a good definition.
      >
      > -Dave
      >
      > --
      > Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
      > New Kensington, PA
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (4) . Top ^
      >
      > 1C
      >
      > RE: WHAT'S "PORTABLE"
      >
      > Wed May 8, 2013 8:07 pm (PDT) . Posted by:
      >
      > "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
      >
      > >> I think this is a good definition.
      >
      > Thank you.
      >
      > It's also necessary; I had to draw a line somewhere.
      >
      > Parts of my manuscript mention interesting grey areas, such as in chapter 3 (luggables), where non-traditional examples include the handles in the original
      > Macintosh and //c.
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (4) . Top ^
      >
      > 1D
      >
      > RE: WHAT'S "PORTABLE"
      >
      > Thu May 9, 2013 2:59 am (PDT) . Posted by:
      >
      > "m" msimonsmail
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, "Evan Koblentz" <evan@... > wrote:
      > > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one
      > of these days I'll finish it...
      >
      > So, what's keeping you from finishing it?
      >
      > --
      > MS
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (4) . Top ^
      >
      > 2A
      >
      > RE: ANYONE HAVE A NORTHSTAR DOS 5 1/4 BOOT DISK FOR A SOL OR CUTTER
      >
      > Wed May 8, 2013 8:26 pm (PDT) . Posted by:
      >
      > "Systems Glitch" systems.glitch
      >
      > On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
      > corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:
      >
      > > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual
      > Northstar system I know you can do that.
      >
      > 1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
      > 2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
      > 3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
      > 4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
      > 5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
      > 6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
      > 7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out
      >
      > Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5
      > if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.
      >
      > Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to
      > make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.
      >
      > > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.
      >
      > If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my
      > patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Jonathan
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (3) . Top ^
      >
      > 2B
      >
      > RE: ANYONE HAVE A NORTHSTAR DOS 5 1/4 BOOT DISK FOR A SOL OR CUTTER
      >
      > Thu May 9, 2013 12:43 am (PDT) . Posted by:
      >
      > "corey986" corey986
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > I will try it myself this week. The Sol has a montor called Solos and the IO routine code is out there for the northstar. I guess I can cross compile it and
      > try Dave's utility. If I have trouble I may take you up on the offer to bring a working northstar system with you to make a boot disk.
      >
      > Thanks again,
      > Corey
      >
      > --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, Systems Glitch <systems. glitch@.. .> wrote:
      > >
      > > On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
      > > corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:
      > >
      > > > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual
      > Northstar system I know you can do that.
      > >
      > > 1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
      > > 2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
      > > 3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
      > > 4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
      > > 5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
      > > 6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
      > > 7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out
      > >
      > > Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5
      > if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.
      > >
      > > Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to
      > make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.
      > >
      > > > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.
      > >
      > > If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with
      > my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.
      > >
      > > Thanks,
      > > Jonathan
      > >
      >
      > Reply to sender . Reply to group . Reply via Web Post . All Messages (3) . Top ^
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      --
      Cory Smelosky
      http://gewt.net/ Personal stuff
      http://gimme-sympathy.org Experiments
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