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FW: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331

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  • Larry Schear
    re-addressed From: larry.schear@hotmail.com To: notify-dg-midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331 Date: Thu, 9 May
    Message 1 of 4 , May 9 8:26 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      re-addressed
       

      From: larry.schear@...
      To: notify-dg-midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
      Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 11:22:31 -0400

      Hi, Evan -
       
      Early on, Claude kagan and I had an early "Portable" computer from Computer Communicaions, Inc. ("CCI"), somewhere in California.  It consisted of four pieces, each of which was man-transportable: a Computer box (about 12" square x 2' long, with a handle on top), an Optical Keyboard (20 or so solid-state light sensors detected light beams which were interrupted by mechanical shutters on each key (negatively affected by Claude's malamutes' dog hair, from operating on a shaggy carpet in hos house)), a monochrome 14" (?) CRT Monitor (with a handle), and an Acoustic Coupler (110 baud) for a telephone handset.  Packaging was white/cream with brown trim.  Used by the R.E.S.I.S.T.O.R.S. at an Atlantic City computer show, working from a telephopne booth, when all other communicaionms at the show were offline!
       
      I may have pictures somewhere.  Will forward them.
       
      Larry Schear
       

      Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 15:12:17 +0000
      From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331

      Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists

      6 New Messages

      Digest #3331
      1a
      What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
      1b
      Re: What's "portable" by "Dave McGuire" purringdave
      1c
      Re: What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
      1d
      Re: What's "portable" by "m" msimonsmail

      Messages

      Wed May 8, 2013 7:03 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz

      >> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition of "portable" ;

      As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of these days I'll finish it...

      Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?

      According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops, because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made for mobility, despite being physically massive.

      So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something that's possible?

      Wed May 8, 2013 7:57 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Dave McGuire" purringdave

      On 05/08/2013 10:03 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
      >>> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition
      >>> of "portable" ;
      >
      > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the
      > evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10
      > years and one of these days I'll finish it...
      >
      > Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?
      >
      > According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to
      > be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops,
      > because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be
      > small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many
      > people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are
      > truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made
      > for mobility, despite being physically massive.
      >
      > So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather
      > is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something
      > that's possible?

      I think this is a good definition.

      -Dave

      --
      Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
      New Kensington, PA

      Wed May 8, 2013 8:07 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz

      >> I think this is a good definition.

      Thank you.

      It's also necessary; I had to draw a line somewhere.

      Parts of my manuscript mention interesting grey areas, such as in chapter 3 (luggables), where non-traditional examples include the handles in the original Macintosh and //c.

      Thu May 9, 2013 2:59 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "m" msimonsmail



      --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, "Evan Koblentz" <evan@... > wrote:
      > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of these days I'll finish it...

      So, what's keeping you from finishing it?

      --
      MS

      Wed May 8, 2013 8:26 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

      "Systems Glitch" systems.glitch

      On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
      corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:

      > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual Northstar system I know you can do that.

      1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
      2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
      3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
      4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
      5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
      6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
      7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out

      Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5 if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.

      Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.

      > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.

      If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.

      Thanks,
      Jonathan

      Thu May 9, 2013 12:43 am (PDT) . Posted by:

      "corey986" corey986

      Thanks,

      I will try it myself this week. The Sol has a montor called Solos and the IO routine code is out there for the northstar. I guess I can cross compile it and try Dave's utility. If I have trouble I may take you up on the offer to bring a working northstar system with you to make a boot disk.

      Thanks again,
      Corey

      --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, Systems Glitch <systems. glitch@.. .> wrote:
      >
      > On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
      > corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:
      >
      > > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual Northstar system I know you can do that.
      >
      > 1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
      > 2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
      > 3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
      > 4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
      > 5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
      > 6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
      > 7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out
      >
      > Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5 if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.
      >
      > Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.
      >
      > > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.
      >
      > If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Jonathan
      >

      We are making changes based on your feedback, Thank you !
      The Yahoo! Groups Product Blog
    • Evan Koblentz
      I m always interested in pictures (and stories!) from RESISTORS. Not sure if that fits into my book project. Perhaps on the edges. ... From: Larry Schear
      Message 2 of 4 , May 9 8:53 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        I'm always interested in pictures (and stories!) from RESISTORS.

        Not sure if that fits into my book project. Perhaps on the edges.

        From: Larry Schear <larry.schear@...>
        Sender: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 11:26:53 -0400
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com<midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
        ReplyTo: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: FW: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331

        re-addressed
         

        From: larry.schear@...
        To: notify-dg-midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
        Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 11:22:31 -0400

        Hi, Evan -
         
        Early on, Claude kagan and I had an early "Portable" computer from Computer Communicaions, Inc. ("CCI"), somewhere in California.  It consisted of four pieces, each of which was man-transportable: a Computer box (about 12" square x 2' long, with a handle on top), an Optical Keyboard (20 or so solid-state light sensors detected light beams which were interrupted by mechanical shutters on each key (negatively affected by Claude's malamutes' dog hair, from operating on a shaggy carpet in hos house)), a monochrome 14" (?) CRT Monitor (with a handle), and an Acoustic Coupler (110 baud) for a telephone handset.  Packaging was white/cream with brown trim.  Used by the R.E.S.I.S.T.O.R.S. at an Atlantic City computer show, working from a telephopne booth, when all other communicaionms at the show were offline!
         
        I may have pictures somewhere.  Will forward them.
         
        Larry Schear
         

        Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 15:12:17 +0000
        From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331

        Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists

        6 New Messages

        Digest #3331
        1a
        What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
        1b
        Re: What's "portable" by "Dave McGuire" purringdave
        1c
        Re: What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
        1d
        Re: What's "portable" by "m" msimonsmail

        Messages

        Wed May 8, 2013 7:03 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz

        >> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition of "portable" ;

        As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of these days I'll finish it...

        Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?

        According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops, because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made for mobility, despite being physically massive.

        So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something that's possible?

        Wed May 8, 2013 7:57 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Dave McGuire" purringdave

        On 05/08/2013 10:03 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
        >>> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition
        >>> of "portable" ;
        >
        > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the
        > evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10
        > years and one of these days I'll finish it...
        >
        > Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?
        >
        > According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to
        > be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops,
        > because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be
        > small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many
        > people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are
        > truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made
        > for mobility, despite being physically massive.
        >
        > So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather
        > is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something
        > that's possible?

        I think this is a good definition.

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA

        Wed May 8, 2013 8:07 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz

        >> I think this is a good definition.

        Thank you.

        It's also necessary; I had to draw a line somewhere.

        Parts of my manuscript mention interesting grey areas, such as in chapter 3 (luggables), where non-traditional examples include the handles in the original Macintosh and //c.

        Thu May 9, 2013 2:59 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        "m" msimonsmail



        --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, "Evan Koblentz" <evan@... > wrote:
        > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of these days I'll finish it...

        So, what's keeping you from finishing it?

        --
        MS

        Wed May 8, 2013 8:26 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

        "Systems Glitch" systems.glitch

        On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
        corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:

        > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual Northstar system I know you can do that.

        1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
        2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
        3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
        4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
        5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
        6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
        7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out

        Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5 if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.

        Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.

        > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.

        If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.

        Thanks,
        Jonathan

        Thu May 9, 2013 12:43 am (PDT) . Posted by:

        "corey986" corey986

        Thanks,

        I will try it myself this week. The Sol has a montor called Solos and the IO routine code is out there for the northstar. I guess I can cross compile it and try Dave's utility. If I have trouble I may take you up on the offer to bring a working northstar system with you to make a boot disk.

        Thanks again,
        Corey

        --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, Systems Glitch <systems. glitch@.. .> wrote:
        >
        > On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
        > corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:
        >
        > > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual Northstar system I know you can do that.
        >
        > 1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
        > 2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
        > 3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
        > 4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
        > 5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
        > 6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
        > 7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out
        >
        > Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5 if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.
        >
        > Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.
        >
        > > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.
        >
        > If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Jonathan
        >

        We are making changes based on your feedback, Thank you !
        The Yahoo! Groups Product Blog
      • Bob Schwier
        If it has a handle and can be lifted onto a battleship with a forklift, it is portable. At least that was the military definition. Remember the ad with a
        Message 3 of 4 , May 9 10:00 AM
        • 0 Attachment
          If it has a handle and can be lifted onto a battleship with a forklift, it is portable.
          At least that was the military definition.
          Remember the ad with a pretty young thing holding a computer case like it was a cosmetics case from about 1970?  She was only lifting a conveniently empty case
          as the real thing needed a weight lifter.
          bs

          --- On Thu, 5/9/13, Larry Schear <larry.schear@...> wrote:

          From: Larry Schear <larry.schear@...>
          Subject: FW: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
          To: "midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com" <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Thursday, May 9, 2013, 11:26 AM

           

          re-addressed
           

          From: larry.schear@...
          To: notify-dg-midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331
          Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 11:22:31 -0400

          Hi, Evan -
           
          Early on, Claude kagan and I had an early "Portable" computer from Computer Communicaions, Inc. ("CCI"), somewhere in California.  It consisted of four pieces, each of which was man-transportable: a Computer box (about 12" square x 2' long, with a handle on top), an Optical Keyboard (20 or so solid-state light sensors detected light beams which were interrupted by mechanical shutters on each key (negatively affected by Claude's malamutes' dog hair, from operating on a shaggy carpet in hos house)), a monochrome 14" (?) CRT Monitor (with a handle), and an Acoustic Coupler (110 baud) for a telephone handset.  Packaging was white/cream with brown trim.  Used by the R.E.S.I.S.T.O.R.S. at an Atlantic City computer show, working from a telephopne booth, when all other communicaionms at the show were offline!
           
          I may have pictures somewhere.  Will forward them.
           
          Larry Schear
           

          Date: Thu, 9 May 2013 15:12:17 +0000
          From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [midatlanticretro] Digest Number 3331

          Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists

          6 New Messages

          Digest #3331
          1a
          What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
          1b
          Re: What's "portable" by "Dave McGuire" purringdave
          1c
          Re: What's "portable" by "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz
          1d
          Re: What's "portable" by "m" msimonsmail

          Messages

          Wed May 8, 2013 7:03 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

          "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz

          >> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition of "portable" ;

          As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of these days I'll finish it...

          Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?

          According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops, because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made for mobility, despite being physically massive.

          So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something that's possible?

          Wed May 8, 2013 7:57 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

          "Dave McGuire" purringdave

          On 05/08/2013 10:03 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
          >>> Well, it got moved in the end, didn't it? That's a certain definition
          >>> of "portable" ;
          >
          > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the
          > evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10
          > years and one of these days I'll finish it...
          >
          > Naturally it starts with a question and a definition: what is "portable" ;?
          >
          > According to me :) the definition is "any computer primarily designed to
          > be moved". For example, that general answer excludes most desktops,
          > because they're meant to be used in one place even if they happen to be
          > small. You * could * take them back and forth from work to home, and many
          > people did, but they're meant to be stationary. However, included are
          > truck-mounted mainframes such as MOBIDIC, because it was specifically made
          > for mobility, despite being physically massive.
          >
          > So for me the question isn't could the system be easily moved, but rather
          > is movement one of its foremost design characteristics, vs. just something
          > that's possible?

          I think this is a good definition.

          -Dave

          --
          Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
          New Kensington, PA

          Wed May 8, 2013 8:07 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

          "Evan Koblentz" ekoblentz

          >> I think this is a good definition.

          Thank you.

          It's also necessary; I had to draw a line somewhere.

          Parts of my manuscript mention interesting grey areas, such as in chapter 3 (luggables), where non-traditional examples include the handles in the original Macintosh and //c.

          Thu May 9, 2013 2:59 am (PDT) . Posted by:

          "m" msimonsmail



          --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, "Evan Koblentz" <evan@... > wrote:
          > As MARCH veterans know, I've been working on a history book about the evolution of portable computers. The book has been "in progress" for 10 years and one of these days I'll finish it...

          So, what's keeping you from finishing it?

          --
          MS

          Wed May 8, 2013 8:26 pm (PDT) . Posted by:

          "Systems Glitch" systems.glitch

          On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
          corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:

          > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual Northstar system I know you can do that.

          1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
          2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
          3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
          4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
          5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
          6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
          7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out

          Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5 if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.

          Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.

          > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.

          If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.

          Thanks,
          Jonathan

          Thu May 9, 2013 12:43 am (PDT) . Posted by:

          "corey986" corey986

          Thanks,

          I will try it myself this week. The Sol has a montor called Solos and the IO routine code is out there for the northstar. I guess I can cross compile it and try Dave's utility. If I have trouble I may take you up on the offer to bring a working northstar system with you to make a boot disk.

          Thanks again,
          Corey

          --- In midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com, Systems Glitch <systems. glitch@.. .> wrote:
          >
          > On Wed, 08 May 2013 23:24:51 -0000
          > corey986 <no_reply@yahoogroup s.com> wrote:
          >
          > > I need a copy or does anyone know how I can bootstrap my Sol-20 with the northstar controller over serial and make a disk? I know if I had an actual Northstar system I know you can do that.
          >
          > 1. Make sure your serial I/O works in 8 bit ASCII mode
          > 2. Get a serial ROM monitor going (Dave Dunfield' s ROM-only monitor is a good choice)
          > 3. Ensure the ROM monitor works over your serial port
          > 4. Use Dave Dunfield' s NST (North Star Transfer) to move his initial image into memory
          > 5. Write a vanilla copy of North Star DOS onto floppy, then boot it
          > 6. Use a monitor (the one for the transfer works) to patch the I/O
          > 7. Jump into the patched code, if it works you get the * prompt and write the disk out
          >
          > Steps 1-5 get you a vanilla copy of North Star DOS on a physical disk. Steps 6-7 are described in detail in the North Star DOS manual. You can skip steps 1-5 if you have a known-good controller and copy of North Star DOS. You need a way to break out of the booted OS and get into your monitor.
          >
          > Alternately, use an existing system with the North Star single-density controller (the jury is still out, but it looks like the DD controller won't work) to make the modifications to an existing disk. This could also be done in an emulator.
          >
          > > Best case would be If someone can make me a boot disk compatible with the Sol I can send you a hard sector 5 1/4 disk.
          >
          > If you'd like I can probably do this for you. I don't have a SOL-20 but the I/O routines can't be too complex. Alternately, I can bring an S-100 system with my patched copy of North Star DOS and write out a new disk with the I/O patches you need for the SOL-20 at the May event.
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Jonathan
          >

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        • Evan Koblentz
          ... Kidding aside, that certainly is one viable definition, and I do intend to include it. However the main focus of the book is on general-purpose computing.
          Message 4 of 4 , May 9 10:06 AM
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            > If it has a handle and can be lifted onto a battleship with a forklift, it is portable. At least that was the military definition.

            Kidding aside, that certainly is one viable definition, and I do intend
            to include it.

            However the main focus of the book is on general-purpose computing.
            Systems on battleships, or systems such as "Flyable TRADIC" are on the
            fringes.


            > Remember the ad with a pretty young thing holding a computer case like it was a cosmetics case from about 1970?

            I don't remember. I was -4. :)

            PS, please trim replies when replying to a digest.
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