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Re: Anyone have a spare teletype?

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  • David
    ... Ummm, yeah, joining MARCH and joining the list would have been the first thing I suggested, several times over the past few years. You can lead a rocket
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 14, 2013
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      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Prof. Mike Littman of Princeton University is looking for teletype machine to use with his PDP-8.
      >
      > Please advise him to join this list.
      >
      Ummm, yeah, joining MARCH and joining the list would have been the first thing I suggested, several times over the past few years. You can lead a rocket scientist to water...
    • Dave McGuire
      ... Professor Littman is a brilliant and very, very nice guy. I knew he used PDP-11s a lot when I worked for him, but this was Princeton in the
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 14, 2013
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        On 04/14/2013 01:04 PM, David wrote:
        >>> Prof. Mike Littman of Princeton University is looking for teletype
        >>> machine to use with his PDP-8.
        >>
        >> Please advise him to join this list.
        >>
        > Ummm, yeah, joining MARCH and joining the list would have been the first
        > thing I suggested, several times over the past few years. You can lead a
        > rocket scientist to water...

        Professor Littman is a brilliant and very, very nice guy. I knew he used
        PDP-11s a lot when I worked for him, but this was Princeton in the
        1980s...EVERYONE used PDP-11s for EVERYTHING. I had no idea that he was
        *personally* interested to the point of having a PDP-anything of his own,
        much less a PDP-8...PDP-11s were just The Computers That We All Used in those
        days, and Princeton University was absolutely CRAWLING with them.

        Our lab had a PDP-11/23+ with a few terminals, running RSX. We got one of
        the first VAX 8200s when they started shipping; it got set up in our lab's
        little private computer room across from the 11/23+.

        Here is a publicity picture from the NSC project that I worked on. This
        was taken in, I think, 1986:

        http://www.neurotica.com/misc/NSC-sm.jpg

        I'm the long-haired kid in the Adidas T-shirt in the left rear. Professor
        Littman is the man standing up on the far right. Professor Nosenchuck is the
        man standing on the left. All that hardware looks like Unibus PDP-11 stuff,
        but it is not...DEC sold 11/24-style chassis and unwired backplanes for OEM
        use, and we built the NSC into those chasiss, using Unibus form factor. The
        only "standard" processor in the NSC was an 80286 on the node manager board.
        The board I was responsible for, the "switch", is the rightmost board
        visible. (not the frontmost)

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA
      • Stephen L
        ... Steve L.
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 15, 2013
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          > Here is a publicity picture from the NSC project that I worked on. This was taken in, I think, 1986:

          --- Thanks for the cool pic, Dave. My word--there were girls!! So what was the NSC project?

          Steve L.
        • Dave McGuire
          ... Yes there were. They re not all that uncommon in the academic research environment. Some of them are even cute, like Lauren in the middle. :) NSC is the
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 15, 2013
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            On 04/15/2013 10:52 AM, Stephen L wrote:
            >> Here is a publicity picture from the NSC project that I worked on. This was taken in, I think, 1986:
            >
            > --- Thanks for the cool pic, Dave. My word--there were girls!! So what was the NSC project?

            Yes there were. They're not all that uncommon in the academic research
            environment. Some of them are even cute, like Lauren in the middle. :)

            NSC is the Navier-Stokes Supercomputer, a rather ingenious vector
            supercomputer that was specifically designed to crunch the Navier-Stokes
            equations, which are more-or-less the cornerstone of fluid dynamics. It was
            designed for NASA via a grant, at the Moody Fluid Dynamics Laboratory at
            Princeton University. The project was started in (if I recall correctly) 1985.

            -Dave

            --
            Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
            New Kensington, PA
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