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Re: Interesting Thread in vintage-computer.com about ages of hobbyists on topic

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  • s100doctor
    ... I ve spoke at length here, and on my Web site, why I m in what some call a hobby . I m in it to interpret, preserve and restore computing of the 1970 s
    Message 1 of 40 , Mar 20, 2013
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      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, joshbensadon <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Loewen <mloewen@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm one of the self-professed "old farts" in the group,
      > > HS class of '73.
      > > My first computer was an IBM 360/67, where I learned FORTRAN.
      >
      > > Punched card technology left a big impression on me.
      > > not feasible for most of us to collect mainframes
      >
      > We need more "old farts", I wish more like you would get online and share the lessons of yesteryear.
      >
      > I wish we all had lots of space for collecting mainframes, etc.
      > Sadly, I don't have the space either, so for this reason I'm working on focusing my collection to the Computers featured in Popular Electronics & Radio Electronics.
      >
      > :)J
      >

      I've spoke at length here, and on my Web site, why I'm in what some call a "hobby". I'm in it to interpret, preserve and restore computing of the 1970's and earlier. I have very specific goals and interests, but this is my description of the context in time. It reflects my age (60) and that gives me some authority (I was there).

      I "share my experiences" because the alternative is to let modern media (including the tech press) redefine 1970's pre-IBM PC and pre-Apple-Mac computing to irrelevance. Note that Josh has to read vintage magazines to know what was going on then. Creating a history on the facts and merits, on 21st century media, is another reason I'm doing what I do.

      As for old people - There's many kinds of generational vintage computing. Certainly, the minicomputers and mainframe computers before and during my time of the 1960's and 70's and 80's. The graphics computers mostly of the 80's and 90's (SGI and Sun). Personal videogame machines. Arcade game machines. Mega-brand computing (IBM, Apple/Mac, Commodore, Atari, etc.).

      PLenty of directions, plenty of generations. And yet, an antique furniture dealer laughs when I say "vintage computers", at the idea that 25 years is "old".

      "Early experience" plus the passage of time, equals what's called "old fart" and I call "legacy". That's the age difference. Every hobby with any history to it, and any organization, has ages and generations. Is the existence of old people, or young, a revelation now? ;)

      Herb Johnson
    • Dave McGuire
      ... Drawing the line at machines one can t move oneself is a good thing. I have an IBM z/890 here. It weighs 2100lbs. No typo. I can drive a forklift on my
      Message 40 of 40 , Mar 21, 2013
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        On 03/21/2013 09:16 PM, Wesley Furr wrote:
        > The only thing I would like to have had that I've turned down was an HP 9000
        > L1000...not really vintage though. I drew the line at something I couldn't
        > move on my own. :-) Would probably have made a nice space heater though...

        Drawing the line at machines one can't move oneself is a good thing.

        I have an IBM z/890 here. It weighs 2100lbs. No typo.

        I can drive a forklift on my own. =)

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA
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