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D-I-Y front panel?

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  • Jeff Jonas
    A friend asks if this will work. Corey? Create an image in color/B&W for both the control labels and the drill/cut guides, reverse it, and print it on inkjet
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 14, 2013
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      A friend asks if this will work. Corey?

      Create an image in color/B&W for both the control labels
      and the drill/cut guides, reverse it, and print it on inkjet film.
      Use permanent spray adhesive (on the ink/image side)
      and carefully apply it to the panel.
    • hornbetw
      ... Print the panel on regular paper and laminate it. You can get sheets to do it yourself or go to Staples, etc. Trim laminated sheet to size and attach
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 15, 2013
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        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Jonas" <jeff_s_jonas@...> wrote:
        >
        > A friend asks if this will work. Corey?
        >
        > Create an image in color/B&W for both the control labels
        > and the drill/cut guides, reverse it, and print it on inkjet film.
        > Use permanent spray adhesive (on the ink/image side)
        > and carefully apply it to the panel.
        >
        Print the panel on regular paper and laminate it. You can get sheets to do it yourself or go to Staples, etc. Trim laminated sheet to size and attach with spray adhesive. Used to do it all the time at my old job to make test sets.

        HTH,
        Tom
      • hornbetw
        ... The April 2013 issue of Nuts & Volts has Part 1 of a 2 part article on making front panels. Tom
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 27, 2013
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          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "hornbetw" <hornbetw@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Jonas" <jeff_s_jonas@> wrote:
          > >
          > > A friend asks if this will work. Corey?
          > >
          > > Create an image in color/B&W for both the control labels
          > > and the drill/cut guides, reverse it, and print it on inkjet film.
          > > Use permanent spray adhesive (on the ink/image side)
          > > and carefully apply it to the panel.
          > >
          > Print the panel on regular paper and laminate it. You can get sheets to do it yourself or go to Staples, etc. Trim laminated sheet to size and attach with spray adhesive. Used to do it all the time at my old job to make test sets.
          >
          > HTH,
          > Tom
          >
          The April 2013 issue of Nuts & Volts has Part 1 of a 2 part article on making front panels.

          Tom
        • Stephen L
          ... I can attest that the inkjet on paper front panel works well as you can see here: http://www.tronola.com/html/sw_and_gnding.html
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 28, 2013
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            > > Print the panel on regular paper and laminate it.

            I can attest that the inkjet on paper front panel works well as you can see here:
            http://www.tronola.com/html/sw_and_gnding.html

            Scroll down to Part II Line Input Selector. Doesn't use any special paper, though I used Hammermill LaserPrint for its quality.

            Some fine points about doing the technique are in the pdf article. (Sorry that the project is otherwise OT here.)

            Steve L.


          • joshbensadon
            ... That s really impressive. I ve done a photo copy of a main panel then put it under a thin sheet (0.080 ) of plexiglass, but I think this method would
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 28, 2013
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              --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Stephen L" <steve@...> wrote:
              >
              > > > Print the panel on regular paper and laminate it.
              >
              > I can attest that the inkjet on paper front panel works well as you can
              > see here:
              > http://www.tronola.com/html/sw_and_gnding.html
              > <http://www.tronola.com/html/sw_and_gnding.html>
              >
              > Scroll down to Part II Line Input Selector. Doesn't use any special
              > paper, though I used Hammermill LaserPrint for its quality.
              >
              > Some fine points about doing the technique are in the pdf article.
              > (Sorry that the project is otherwise OT here.)
              >
              > Steve L.

              That's really impressive. I've done a photo copy of a main panel then put it under a thin sheet (0.080") of plexiglass, but I think this method would likely create a nicer effect.

              OT? I see nothing OT about listening to *vintage* music on your *vintage* stereo while working on your *vintage* computer. Somebody shoot me.

              :)J
            • corey986
              Actually I don t own an inkjet so I can t attest to that. But if its not going to need white which really needs paint , I would try watershed decal paper.
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 28, 2013
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                Actually I don't own an inkjet so I can't attest to that. But if its not going to need "white" which really needs "paint", I would try watershed decal paper. They make specific ones for laser or inkjet.

                Cheers,
                Corey

                --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Jonas" <jeff_s_jonas@...> wrote:
                >
                > A friend asks if this will work. Corey?
                >
                > Create an image in color/B&W for both the control labels
                > and the drill/cut guides, reverse it, and print it on inkjet film.
                > Use permanent spray adhesive (on the ink/image side)
                > and carefully apply it to the panel.
                >
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