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Boards Rescued...

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  • DougCrawford
    May not be a great save, but rooting through some boxes of boards at my local surplus place, I found: a huge 1983 NCR 2MB memory board with scads of 16MB dram
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 8, 2013
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      May not be a great save, but rooting through some boxes of boards
      at my local surplus place, I found:

      a huge 1983 NCR 2MB memory board with scads of 16MB dram chips.
      I'm guessing from a Tower series. It not a bus board; it looks like
      it was stacked against a frame; it has locking ribbon cable connectors.

      a CPU board from what looks like an Altos 8000 series. The entire board
      is socketed. Loads of z80 stuff, 208K memory.

      An Altos 8" floppy controller board. Also all socketed.

      The boards are in pretty good condition and look complete.
      A little corrosion in spots. Edge pins are mangled in a few
      places,but straightenable.

      Its a shame they were torn out of their original enclosures!
      Don't know what I'm going to do with them.
      Make great displays if nothing else.
      Can post pics of anyone is interested.
    • Wesley Furr
      Doug, What is your relationship with your local recycle place? I ve got one here in town, but they don t seem very interested in keeping an eye out for old
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 9, 2013
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        Doug,

        What is your relationship with your local recycle place? I've got one here
        in town, but they don't seem very interested in keeping an eye out for old
        stuff. The manager changed over a while back and I thought I was in (the
        prior guy didn't give a crap), but now I'm beginning to wonder. Did get a
        few things...but only because I was lucky the day I dropped by and they were
        laying around (some middle-aged Mac stuff). They also had some of the
        old-school all-in-one Mac's, but they took them around back and destroyed
        them to be sure there weren't hard drives in them...rather than investigate
        to find out they didn't (apparently they require a LONG torx driver to open
        them up properly). The only things they leave sitting out for sale are
        new-ish computers that they've cleaned up and have for sale, and some
        monitors and accessories. Does your place have these boxes sitting around
        for anyone to come in and look through? Or do you ask? Or do they save
        stuff for you? Just curious how this works for other folks and what I might
        should try to do on my end to attempt to purchase some of the old stuff from
        them rather than it going in the recycle bin...

        Thanks,

        Wesley


        -----Original Message-----
        From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DougCrawford
        Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 3:17 PM
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] Boards Rescued...

        May not be a great save, but rooting through some boxes of boards at my
        local surplus place, I found:
      • DougCrawford
        Ah the frustrations! The place these boards came from has a fairly static inventory. Its not the kind of place that people drop stuff off at. The sad part here
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 9, 2013
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          Ah the frustrations!
          The place these boards came from has a fairly static inventory.
          Its not the kind of place that people drop stuff off at.
          The sad part here is that a lot of the stuff has been
          stored for a long time in very non-idea atmospheric conditions.

          There is a recycling center that is more like what you
          are talking about, they tend to destroy stuff and are very
          paranoid about being a conduit for personal info on hard drives.
          But they won't let someone sanitize the systems for them.

          Like other things, its all about relationships I guess;
          You have to have something to offer them to get them to work
          with you. Be creative?

          I can tell you a bit about Macs:
          old compact Macs- yes a long torque is required. Got mine off ebay sold as a Mac tool. Rather easy tear down and fix. The drive bay metalwork is a bit of a pain. Did a tube swap, had to tear almost the whole thing down. Only the SE/30s have really bad cap deterioration problems on the main board. Figures that it is also one of the most desirable ones! I have tried recapping one and was successful. Other than that, I've mainly had to replace hard drives and reload OS's and try to find interesting applications. The software is largely in the public domain now. The trick, however, is getting files from the web to non-networked Macs. I have worked through this but it was a pain... used a PC to get the files, used a PC program (not free) to write a Mac format 1.44 floppy (linear track, superdrive type format), read this into an LCII with a superdrive, used the silly decompress utilities for the MAC to get the disk image, mount the disk image, open the disk image. *whew* a lot of layers! Theoretically, I should be able to write a variable speed 800K disk on this LCII and transfer the sneakernet to a non-superdrive MAC (SE, Plus). I haven't tried working with 400K floppies. Or I could network w/ appletalk and share files off the LCCII, but I haven't bothered to get the cables.
          This is a great resource: http://68kmla.org
          That's where I got good info on recapping the SE/30.

          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Wesley Furr" <wesley@...> wrote:
          >
          > Doug,
          >
          > What is your relationship with your local recycle place? I've got one here
          > in town, but they don't seem very interested in keeping an eye out for old
          > stuff. The manager changed over a while back and I thought I was in (the
          > prior guy didn't give a crap), but now I'm beginning to wonder. Did get a
          > few things...but only because I was lucky the day I dropped by and they were
          > laying around (some middle-aged Mac stuff). They also had some of the
          > old-school all-in-one Mac's, but they took them around back and destroyed
          > them to be sure there weren't hard drives in them...rather than investigate
          > to find out they didn't (apparently they require a LONG torx driver to open
          > them up properly). The only things they leave sitting out for sale are
          > new-ish computers that they've cleaned up and have for sale, and some
          > monitors and accessories. Does your place have these boxes sitting around
          > for anyone to come in and look through? Or do you ask? Or do they save
          > stuff for you? Just curious how this works for other folks and what I might
          > should try to do on my end to attempt to purchase some of the old stuff from
          > them rather than it going in the recycle bin...
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Wesley
          >
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          > [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of DougCrawford
          > Sent: Friday, March 08, 2013 3:17 PM
          > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Boards Rescued...
          >
          > May not be a great save, but rooting through some boxes of boards at my
          > local surplus place, I found:
          >
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