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any Camp Evans links to him?

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  • Jeff Jonas
    Short film about Ralph Baer, the Father of Video Games http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/g2NibAgwuPg/short-film-about-ralph-baer-t.html
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 8, 2013
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      Short film about Ralph Baer, the "Father of Video Games"

      http://feeds.boingboing.net/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/g2NibAgwuPg/short-film-about-ralph-baer-t.html

      http://boingboing.net/?p=217329

      Ralph Baer's inventing career began following a two-year service in the military during World War II. Returning home from Europe, he went to school on the G.I. Bill and graduated with a B.S. in Television Engineering. In 1955, he joined an electronics firm called Sanders Associates, which did work for the military. Still there in 1966, he began work on an electronic box that would allow people to play games on their televisions. The working invention was later licensed as the Magnavox Odyssey and became the first home console system for video gaming in 1972. Last year he celebrated his 90th birthday – the same year the Odyssey turned 40. Here he talks about those early days of video game history and why now, at 90 years old, he's still inventing.
    • Evan Koblentz
      ... No. But I kind of know him. I reviewed his autobiography back when I used to publish a newsletter. Looking back, there are parts I d edit, but I stand by
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 8, 2013
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        >> Camp Evans links to him

        No.

        But I kind of know him. I reviewed his autobiography back when I used to publish a newsletter.

        Looking back, there are parts I'd edit, but I stand by the gist: http://www.snarc.net/tr/baer.htm

        Summary: Ralph is a brilliant inventor, but he's the father of "home" videogames, as the book's subtitle states. Yet in the first chapter he claims to be the father of ALL videogames, and he claims that any videogame not played on a raster screen isn't a real videogame. I dislike that -- I can (partially) partially understand dismissing o-scope pong, but Spacewar? Sure it was on a mainframe, but it was still a game (and a graphical one at that) on a video screen.

        By coincidence, the person who published the book (Len Herman) lives around the corner from me. Len had a vendor booth at VCF East two years ago. (Check out his company's other books: rolentapress.com.)
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