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OT: Computers as investment or your Children's inheirtance?

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  • joshbensadon
    ... That s a great idea. I personally would hope my son will take an interest but who knows? I didn t take an interest in my dad s stamp collection but
    Message 1 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Mike Loewen <mloewen@...> wrote:
      >
      > In the event of my untimely demise, my wife has instructions to contact
      > this group for assistance in selling the valuable items and finding homes
      > for the rest. With working IMSAIs selling for > $2,000, that's only fair
      > to her.


      That's a great idea. I personally would hope my son will take an interest but who knows? I didn't take an interest in my dad's stamp collection but hopefully, I'll find a way to get him involved.

      Does anyone here have children that are interested in this hobby?
      If so, would you say it's their nature or how you raised them?

      For Evan's sake, I'll label this as OT.

      Cheers,
      Josh
    • Mike Loewen
      ... Hey, I must be trustworthy! Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic.scol.pa.us Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
      Message 2 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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        On Wed, 6 Mar 2013, Brian Schenkenberger, VAXman- wrote:

        > Dave McGuire <Mcguire@...> writes:
        >
        >> On 03/06/2013 12:53 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
        >>> Wow, the Bankrate site has deleted my comment.
        >>
        >> Damn suits.
        >
        > You just can't trust anybody with...
        >
        > - a suit.
        > - a shave.
        > - a haircut.
        > - a "practiced" profession.
        > - a title other than Mr. or Mrs.

        Hey, I must be trustworthy!


        Mike Loewen mloewen@...
        Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
      • William Donzelli
        ... All these PeeCees and Windows machines we hate now will be worth money - and I think the timeframe will be far shorter than 100 years. Every class of
        Message 3 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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          > In 100 years, if someone still has a working Windows 95 laptop, it
          > will be worth more than it is now. But, that'll only help your great-
          > grandchildren to cash in. But that will be because most similar
          > laptops will have disappeared, into landfills or recycling centers.
          > And, that still does not make it an investment.

          All these PeeCees and Windows machines we hate now will be worth money
          - and I think the timeframe will be far shorter than 100 years. Every
          class of gadget that had an impact on society becomes collectable
          eventually.

          > For something to be an investment, you have to have the expectation of
          > a return on capital -while- you own it... like land, stock shares,
          > real estate, and financial instruments.

          This is not true. You can certainly have investments that are solely
          intended for heirs, either trusts or living people. There are indeed
          people that do this in their estate plans - it is not an uncommon
          strategy.

          --
          Will
        • William Donzelli
          ... Yes, as part of a will. However, nobody does this. And I really mean *nobody*. One part of my profession is buying up the estates of engineers and ham
          Message 4 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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            > A very good idea. Even better would be to put it in writing, as part
            > of a legal will.

            Yes, as part of a will.

            However, nobody does this. And I really mean *nobody*.

            One part of my profession is buying up the estates of engineers and
            ham radio operators, and see this first hand. Widows are burdened with
            piles of interesting stuff that they all to often see as crap. For
            every estate cleanout I do, I hear of ten that went in the dumpster,
            because of a lack of proper, formal estate planning. And proper,
            formal estate planning means a will with detailed and explicit
            instructions on what is to be done with the collection.

            Anything else, as good as the intentions may be, is skating close to worthless.

            So...broadcasting to everyone here...create or update your wills.

            --
            Will
          • William Donzelli
            ... Do you mean a Collection Policy? Nope, never heard of such a thing, either... -- Will
            Message 5 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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              > True, be we hobbyists need to keep our crap under control, there is a
              > point
              > when a collection becomes a problem and we need to know where the "line"
              > is...

              Do you mean a Collection Policy?

              Nope, never heard of such a thing, either...

              --
              Will
            • Wesley Furr
              Do these detailed and explicit instructions need to be part of a formal lawyer-written and legalese-filled document, or will it suffice to have a written note
              Message 6 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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                Do these detailed and explicit instructions need to be part of a formal
                lawyer-written and legalese-filled document, or will it suffice to have a
                written note with your signed name on it? Or just a formal will with a line
                saying to see a related informal document?

                Sounds like a good idea regardless of what one is collecting...

                Wesley


                -----Original Message-----

                Yes, as part of a will.

                However, nobody does this. And I really mean *nobody*.

                One part of my profession is buying up the estates of engineers and ham
                radio operators, and see this first hand. Widows are burdened with piles of
                interesting stuff that they all to often see as crap. For every estate
                cleanout I do, I hear of ten that went in the dumpster, because of a lack of
                proper, formal estate planning. And proper, formal estate planning means a
                will with detailed and explicit instructions on what is to be done with the
                collection.

                Anything else, as good as the intentions may be, is skating close to
                worthless.

                So...broadcasting to everyone here...create or update your wills.

                --
                Will
              • William Donzelli
                ... A legal will does not have to be a lawyer-written and legalese-filled document, but often it is a good idea. It is also a good idea to have all the
                Message 7 of 27 , Mar 6, 2013
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                  > Do these detailed and explicit instructions need to be part of a formal
                  > lawyer-written and legalese-filled document, or will it suffice to have a
                  > written note with your signed name on it? Or just a formal will with a
                  > line
                  > saying to see a related informal document?

                  A legal will does not have to be a lawyer-written and legalese-filled
                  document, but often it is a good idea.

                  It is also a good idea to have all the information in a will, rather
                  than on attached documents. The latter are prone to getting lost, and
                  can result in a tangle if the will is contested.

                  To do this properly, the collection should be clearly defined, so the
                  executor knows what is to be dealt with. Major items in the collection
                  should be identified and listed with descriptions, model numbers, and
                  even serial numbers, if applicable. There should be clear guidelines
                  for the executor so they know how to deal with the collection. There
                  should be contingencies in case the executor can not perform his
                  duties (this happens a *lot* - executors die too), listing museums and
                  historic groups that could potentially help. There should also be
                  contingencies in case beneficiaries can not accept what is willed to
                  them (because they die too).

                  All this is basic estate lawyer stuff.

                  --
                  Will
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