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Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Cheap Bit Banger's Calculator

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  • Dave McGuire
    ... I have a 28S as well. It was my daily driver for programming until about a month ago when one of its keys died. I haven t gotten around to attempting
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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      On 12/06/2012 01:01 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:
      > I still have my first HP, the HP28s (or c but I think it's the s).
      > I won't let it go (though the battery compartment is broke, a common
      > flaw on the 28). The 28 can do 'normal math' but RPN is so much easier

      I have a 28S as well. It was my daily driver for programming until
      about a month ago when one of its keys died. I haven't gotten around to
      attempting repair yet. I was heartbroken; that's such a fantastic
      calculator for programming use!

      > That said, I always have my phone and my tablets around so I just use
      > them with droid48 (x48). On my Linux box I have a command line version
      > of a rpl calculator (based on the hp28). I downloaded it from
      > comp.sources.misc and I've had it ever since (C portable code good!).

      WHat's the name of that rpl command line calculator? I'd love to have
      that.

      -Dave

      --
      Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
      New Kensington, PA
    • Dave McGuire
      ... ROFL! Yes I love my HPs for parallel resistance calculations. FAR easier and faster. ... My favorite all-around calculator for lab use is the HP-41, when
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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        On 12/06/2012 11:44 AM, Kyle Owen wrote:
        > However, it still wasn't until I was into my freshman year of college
        > that I really saw the benefits of RPN. My absolute favorite
        > demonstration is parallel resistance calculations. For most algebraic
        > calculators, the method is 1/(1/a+1/b), where a and b are the two
        > resistor values to be paralleled, and sometimes people even insert more
        > parenthesis than need be. On the RPN, it's just a [inv] b [inv] + [inv].
        > Far fewer keystrokes! One of my professors even made a joke (hardly a
        > joke, really) that the students who finish first on exams must all have
        > RPN calculators.

        ROFL! Yes I love my HPs for parallel resistance calculations. FAR
        easier and faster.

        > Just recently I got an HP-48g to replace my 50g, which replaced the
        > 49g+. The 50g is nice, but who needs all of those features for EE?
        > Certainly not I. The buttons on the 48g are infinitely better anyways.

        My favorite all-around calculator for lab use is the HP-41, when I'm
        at my desk writing code it is (was, see other email) an HP-28S, and for
        everything else I like the HP-48SX.

        > One day, I'll own an HP-9100A...

        Keep dreamin'.

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA
      • Neil Cherry
        ... It s called rpl, somehow I named it hp28 and I left it that way (it doesn t do everything the HP28 does and it s a little different than the hp48).
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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          On 12/06/2012 01:03 PM, Dave McGuire wrote:
          > On 12/06/2012 01:01 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:

          > > That said, I always have my phone and my tablets around so I just use
          > > them with droid48 (x48). On my Linux box I have a command line version
          > > of a rpl calculator (based on the hp28). I downloaded it from
          > > comp.sources.misc and I've had it ever since (C portable code good!).
          >
          > WHat's the name of that rpl command line calculator? I'd love to have
          > that.

          It's called rpl, somehow I named it hp28 and I left it that way (it doesn't
          do everything the HP28 does and it's a little different than the hp48).

          http://linuxha.com/athome/common/hp28-20121206.tgz

          I have a ton of hp28 manuals (including this utility manuals written by a
          3rd party). The scripting is nice and the fact that you can access the
          OS from the calculator.

          --
          Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
          http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
          http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
          Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
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