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Cheap Bit Banger's Calculator

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  • Burning Image
    FYI - I had to pick up something from the local (South Jersey) Rite Aid this afternoon and noticed a cheap scientific calculator for $9.49.  Closer
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 5, 2012
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      FYI - I had to pick up something from the local (South Jersey) Rite Aid this afternoon and noticed a cheap scientific calculator for $9.49.  Closer examination revealed it could do BIN/OCT/HEX math, too.  No [2nd FUNC] for ROR or ROL, but at less than $10, the price seemed right for one of my my tool cases.

      Yeah - I have apps for my iWhatevers, but sometimes a standalone device is nice, too.

      If anyone's looking for something like this and you're near a Rite Aid, it might be worth a stop on the way home...

      Cory - WA3UVV


    • Neil Cherry
      ... Divide by 10, multiply by 10 ;-) ... I don t know if you have an Android phone or not but for the Android phone there is Droid48 (HP48 from the x48
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 5, 2012
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        On 12/05/2012 03:52 PM, Burning Image wrote:
        > FYI - I had to pick up something from the local (South Jersey) Rite Aid this afternoon
        > and noticed a cheap scientific calculator for $9.49. Closer examination revealed it
        > could do BIN/OCT/HEX math, too. No [2nd FUNC] for ROR or ROL, but at less than $10,
        > the price seemed right for one of my my tool cases.

        Divide by 10, multiply by 10 ;-)

        > Yeah - I have apps for my iWhatevers, but sometimes a standalone device is nice, too.

        I don't know if you have an Android phone or not but for the Android phone
        there is Droid48 (HP48 from the x48 project). I have this on my phone and
        tablets. I suspect there should be one for the Apple products too. And it's
        free. It's usually easier to find than any one of my hand held calculators.
        Though I now find that I now can't do anything more than simple calculations
        on anything other than an RPN calculator.

        --
        Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
        http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
        http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
        Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
      • corey986
        I can t even use a regular calculator, I learned on an RPN and so if I m not using my HP-35 (being careful not to do a 2.02 ln then ex) I tend to use m48 on
        Message 3 of 13 , Dec 5, 2012
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          I can't even use a regular calculator,

          I learned on an RPN and so if I'm not using my HP-35 (being careful not to do a 2.02 ln then ex) I tend to use m48 on the iPhone (free hp 48 emulator) or on the iPad I sometimes use "programmer calculator" to do quick octal conversions, but I don't really use "programmer calculator" for any math (remember I can't use non RPN)

          Cheers,
          Corey

          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Neil Cherry <ncherry@...> wrote:
          >
          > On 12/05/2012 03:52 PM, Burning Image wrote:
          > > FYI - I had to pick up something from the local (South Jersey) Rite Aid this afternoon
          > > and noticed a cheap scientific calculator for $9.49. Closer examination revealed it
          > > could do BIN/OCT/HEX math, too. No [2nd FUNC] for ROR or ROL, but at less than $10,
          > > the price seemed right for one of my my tool cases.
          >
          > Divide by 10, multiply by 10 ;-)
          >
          > > Yeah - I have apps for my iWhatevers, but sometimes a standalone device is nice, too.
          >
          > I don't know if you have an Android phone or not but for the Android phone
          > there is Droid48 (HP48 from the x48 project). I have this on my phone and
          > tablets. I suspect there should be one for the Apple products too. And it's
          > free. It's usually easier to find than any one of my hand held calculators.
          > Though I now find that I now can't do anything more than simple calculations
          > on anything other than an RPN calculator.
          >
          > --
          > Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
          > http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
          > http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
          > Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
          >
        • Neil Cherry
          ... It s weird that once you go RPN it s the end. ;-) Damit, I m an engineer not a poet! I have a very difficult time remembering how to order the statement
          Message 4 of 13 , Dec 5, 2012
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            On 12/05/2012 06:57 PM, corey986 wrote:
            >
            >
            > I can't even use a regular calculator,
            >
            > I learned on an RPN and so if I'm not using my HP-35 (being careful not to do a 2.02 ln
            > then ex) I tend to use m48 on the iPhone (free hp 48 emulator) or on the iPad I sometimes
            > use "programmer calculator" to do quick octal conversions, but I don't really use
            > "programmer calculator" for any math (remember I can't use non RPN)

            It's weird that once you go RPN it's the end. ;-) Damit, I'm an engineer not a poet!

            I have a very difficult time remembering how to order the statement for normal
            calculators. Basically it looks like LISP (Lots of Irritating, Silly Parenthesis).

            --
            Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
            http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
            http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
            Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
          • Dave McGuire
            ... I use i48 and i48CX on my iPhone. They re both wonderful. I too am an RPN-head. I haven t used an algebraic calculator in probably 25 years. I don t
            Message 5 of 13 , Dec 5, 2012
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              On 12/05/2012 04:17 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:
              > I don't know if you have an Android phone or not but for the Android phone
              > there is Droid48 (HP48 from the x48 project). I have this on my phone and
              > tablets. I suspect there should be one for the Apple products too. And it's
              > free. It's usually easier to find than any one of my hand held calculators.
              > Though I now find that I now can't do anything more than simple calculations
              > on anything other than an RPN calculator.

              I use i48 and i48CX on my iPhone. They're both wonderful.

              I too am an RPN-head. I haven't used an algebraic calculator in
              probably 25 years. I don't find them usable at all. The way we're
              taught "how to do math" in 2nd-3rd grade (or so) is OH so
              inefficient...and that crap gets ingrained in our brains. Ugh.

              -Dave

              --
              Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
              New Kensington, PA
            • Dave McGuire
              ... Right there with you. (sorry for jumping in) ... Yeah. Having to use tons of parens as a crutch for an ineffective notation is really a pain. -Dave --
              Message 6 of 13 , Dec 5, 2012
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                On 12/05/2012 07:08 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:
                > It's weird that once you go RPN it's the end. ;-) Damit, I'm an engineer not a poet!

                Right there with you. (sorry for jumping in)

                > I have a very difficult time remembering how to order the statement for normal
                > calculators. Basically it looks like LISP (Lots of Irritating, Silly Parenthesis).

                Yeah. Having to use tons of parens as a crutch for an ineffective
                notation is really a pain.

                -Dave

                --
                Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                New Kensington, PA
              • Burning Image
                All this talk of RPN is making me miss my HP-97 of many, many years ago... Cory - WA3UVV
                Message 7 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                  All this talk of RPN is making me miss my HP-97 of many, many years ago...

                  Cory - WA3UVV


                • Kyle Owen
                  My dad got me my first calculator for school when I was in 11th grade for Christmas, since an advanced graphing calculator was required for AP Calculus. He got
                  Message 8 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                    My dad got me my first calculator for school when I was in 11th grade for Christmas, since an advanced graphing calculator was required for AP Calculus. He got me, not the TI-89 Titanium that everyone else had, but rather the HP-49g+. I hate to say it, but I was very disappointed that I didn't get the mainstream calculator. My dad ended up agreeing that since the school pushed for TIs that he'd get me a TI.

                    It wasn't until my summer before my senior year of high school that I ended up really using the 49g+. The buttons promptly started breaking, as was the "feature" with said calculator. One of my dad's friends gave me his original college calculator, an HP-45 (HP's second scientific model), and after replacing the batteries, I was able to use it quite a bit. That got me really started with enjoying the benefits of RPN.

                    However, it still wasn't until I was into my freshman year of college that I really saw the benefits of RPN. My absolute favorite demonstration is parallel resistance calculations. For most algebraic calculators, the method is 1/(1/a+1/b), where a and b are the two resistor values to be paralleled, and sometimes people even insert more parenthesis than need be. On the RPN, it's just a [inv] b [inv] + [inv]. Far fewer keystrokes! One of my professors even made a joke (hardly a joke, really) that the students who finish first on exams must all have RPN calculators.

                    Just recently I got an HP-48g to replace my 50g, which replaced the 49g+. The 50g is nice, but who needs all of those features for EE? Certainly not I. The buttons on the 48g are infinitely better anyways.

                    On my Android, RealCalc is a favorite, as it has a nice RPN mode. Takes a little getting used to from the 48g world, as the entry vs. x register is not as well defined in RealCalc as it is in the HP world. Entry automatically becomes x, and everything else is pushed up. In HP land, the entry is its own temporary register, which I prefer, likely because I'm used to it. Maybe I should try out a 48 emulator on Android.

                    One day, I'll own an HP-9100A... 

                    Kyle
                  • Dave McGuire
                    ... Wow, very cool. Most people opted for the handheld version, the 67. I have two 97s (I have a biggish collection of HP calculators) and would be willing to
                    Message 9 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                      On 12/06/2012 09:28 AM, Burning Image wrote:
                      > All this talk of RPN is making me miss my HP-97 of many, many years ago...

                      Wow, very cool. Most people opted for the handheld version, the 67.

                      I have two 97s (I have a biggish collection of HP calculators) and
                      would be willing to part with one for the right deal. I can bring it
                      with me when I come to your place this weekend. Let me know if you
                      wanna talk turkey.

                      -Dave

                      --
                      Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                      New Kensington, PA
                    • Neil Cherry
                      ... I still have my first HP, the HP28s (or c but I think it s the s). I won t let it go (though the battery compartment is broke, a common flaw on the 28).
                      Message 10 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                        On 12/06/2012 11:48 AM, Dave McGuire wrote:
                        > On 12/06/2012 09:28 AM, Burning Image wrote:
                        > > All this talk of RPN is making me miss my HP-97 of many, many years ago...
                        >
                        > Wow, very cool. Most people opted for the handheld version, the 67.
                        >
                        > I have two 97s (I have a biggish collection of HP calculators) and
                        > would be willing to part with one for the right deal. I can bring it
                        > with me when I come to your place this weekend. Let me know if you
                        > wanna talk turkey.

                        I still have my first HP, the HP28s (or c but I think it's the s).
                        I won't let it go (though the battery compartment is broke, a common
                        flaw on the 28). The 28 can do 'normal math' but RPN is so much easier

                        That said, I always have my phone and my tablets around so I just use
                        them with droid48 (x48). On my Linux box I have a command line version
                        of a rpl calculator (based on the hp28). I downloaded it from
                        comp.sources.misc and I've had it ever since (C portable code good!).

                        --
                        Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
                        http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
                        http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
                        Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
                      • Dave McGuire
                        ... I have a 28S as well. It was my daily driver for programming until about a month ago when one of its keys died. I haven t gotten around to attempting
                        Message 11 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                          On 12/06/2012 01:01 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:
                          > I still have my first HP, the HP28s (or c but I think it's the s).
                          > I won't let it go (though the battery compartment is broke, a common
                          > flaw on the 28). The 28 can do 'normal math' but RPN is so much easier

                          I have a 28S as well. It was my daily driver for programming until
                          about a month ago when one of its keys died. I haven't gotten around to
                          attempting repair yet. I was heartbroken; that's such a fantastic
                          calculator for programming use!

                          > That said, I always have my phone and my tablets around so I just use
                          > them with droid48 (x48). On my Linux box I have a command line version
                          > of a rpl calculator (based on the hp28). I downloaded it from
                          > comp.sources.misc and I've had it ever since (C portable code good!).

                          WHat's the name of that rpl command line calculator? I'd love to have
                          that.

                          -Dave

                          --
                          Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                          New Kensington, PA
                        • Dave McGuire
                          ... ROFL! Yes I love my HPs for parallel resistance calculations. FAR easier and faster. ... My favorite all-around calculator for lab use is the HP-41, when
                          Message 12 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                            On 12/06/2012 11:44 AM, Kyle Owen wrote:
                            > However, it still wasn't until I was into my freshman year of college
                            > that I really saw the benefits of RPN. My absolute favorite
                            > demonstration is parallel resistance calculations. For most algebraic
                            > calculators, the method is 1/(1/a+1/b), where a and b are the two
                            > resistor values to be paralleled, and sometimes people even insert more
                            > parenthesis than need be. On the RPN, it's just a [inv] b [inv] + [inv].
                            > Far fewer keystrokes! One of my professors even made a joke (hardly a
                            > joke, really) that the students who finish first on exams must all have
                            > RPN calculators.

                            ROFL! Yes I love my HPs for parallel resistance calculations. FAR
                            easier and faster.

                            > Just recently I got an HP-48g to replace my 50g, which replaced the
                            > 49g+. The 50g is nice, but who needs all of those features for EE?
                            > Certainly not I. The buttons on the 48g are infinitely better anyways.

                            My favorite all-around calculator for lab use is the HP-41, when I'm
                            at my desk writing code it is (was, see other email) an HP-28S, and for
                            everything else I like the HP-48SX.

                            > One day, I'll own an HP-9100A...

                            Keep dreamin'.

                            -Dave

                            --
                            Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                            New Kensington, PA
                          • Neil Cherry
                            ... It s called rpl, somehow I named it hp28 and I left it that way (it doesn t do everything the HP28 does and it s a little different than the hp48).
                            Message 13 of 13 , Dec 6, 2012
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                              On 12/06/2012 01:03 PM, Dave McGuire wrote:
                              > On 12/06/2012 01:01 PM, Neil Cherry wrote:

                              > > That said, I always have my phone and my tablets around so I just use
                              > > them with droid48 (x48). On my Linux box I have a command line version
                              > > of a rpl calculator (based on the hp28). I downloaded it from
                              > > comp.sources.misc and I've had it ever since (C portable code good!).
                              >
                              > WHat's the name of that rpl command line calculator? I'd love to have
                              > that.

                              It's called rpl, somehow I named it hp28 and I left it that way (it doesn't
                              do everything the HP28 does and it's a little different than the hp48).

                              http://linuxha.com/athome/common/hp28-20121206.tgz

                              I have a ton of hp28 manuals (including this utility manuals written by a
                              3rd party). The scripting is nice and the fact that you can access the
                              OS from the calculator.

                              --
                              Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
                              http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
                              http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
                              Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
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