Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Museum Report 20121125 11/25/2012

Expand Messages
  • Jeffrey Brace
    Today was superslow. Only one visitor who got the rush tour from Fred. So I worked on getting the keyboard for the MARCH Commodore PET cleaned. I disassembled
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 25, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Today was superslow. Only one visitor who got the rush tour from Fred. So I worked on getting the keyboard for the MARCH Commodore PET cleaned. I disassembled it and cleaned it. But some of the keys still didn’t work properly. I noticed that some of the keys had something metallic on the bottom of them and others didn’t. It appeared to be random. Talking to Dan Wobser and to Ian Primus, I found out that the rubber in the keys is a sorta conductive silicon. My suspicion is that this silicon becomes less conductive over time or is not reliable to being with. It seems that the previous owner had fixed some keys by adding some metal to the bottom of the keys. I think it is ordinary aluminum, but I have to ask around and do research. When I replaced one of the keys with the thin metal on the bottom to previously not working key, then it worked. My plan is to put this metal on the bottom of all the keys so that they will all work and be reliable. If anyone knows what kind of metal it is and where I can buy it, then I would appreciate it !
       
      Jeff Brace
       
       
    • Mike Loewen
      ... How about something like this? http://store.caig.com/s.nl/it.A/id.1626/.f?sc=2&category=41 Mike Loewen mloewen@cpumagic.scol.pa.us Old Technology
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 25, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sun, 25 Nov 2012, Jeffrey Brace wrote:

        > Today was superslow. Only one visitor who got the rush tour from Fred.
        > So I worked on getting the keyboard for the MARCH Commodore PET cleaned.
        > I disassembled it and cleaned it. But some of the keys still didn?t work
        > properly. I noticed that some of the keys had something metallic on the
        > bottom of them and others didn?t. It appeared to be random. Talking to
        > Dan Wobser and to Ian Primus, I found out that the rubber in the keys is
        > a sorta conductive silicon. My suspicion is that this silicon becomes
        > less conductive over time or is not reliable to being with. It seems
        > that the previous owner had fixed some keys by adding some metal to the
        > bottom of the keys. I think it is ordinary aluminum, but I have to ask
        > around and do research. When I replaced one of the keys with the thin
        > metal on the bottom to previously not working key, then it worked. My
        > plan is to put this metal on the bottom of all the keys so that they
        > will all work and be reliable. If anyone knows what kind of metal it is
        > and where I can buy it, then I would appreciate it !

        How about something like this?

        http://store.caig.com/s.nl/it.A/id.1626/.f?sc=2&category=41


        Mike Loewen mloewen@...
        Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
      • B. Degnan
        ... Jeff, There are threads here and there about repairing these keyboards, such as on vintage-computer.com and probably classic cmp. I would check there.
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 25, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          -------- Original Message --------
          > From: "Jeffrey Brace" <ark72axow@...>
          > Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 9:21 PM
          > To: "midatlanticretro" <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
          > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Museum Report 20121125 11/25/2012
          >
          > Today was superslow. Only one visitor who got the rush tour from Fred. So I worked on getting the keyboard for the MARCH Commodore PET cleaned. I disassembled it and cleaned it. But some of the keys still didn't work properly. I noticed that some of the keys had something metallic on the bottom of them and others didn't. It appeared to be random. Talking to Dan Wobser and to Ian Primus, I found out that the rubber in the keys is a sorta conductive silicon. My suspicion is that this silicon becomes less conductive over time or is not reliable to being with. It seems that the previous owner had fixed some keys by adding some metal to the bottom of the keys. I think it is ordinary aluminum, but I have to ask around and do research. When I replaced one of the keys with the thin metal on the bottom to previously not working key, then it worked. My plan is to put this metal on the bottom of all the keys so that they will all work and be reliable. If anyone knows what kind of metal it is and where I can buy it, then I would appreciate it !
          >
          > Jeff Brace

          Jeff,
          There are threads here and there about repairing these keyboards, such as on vintage-computer.com and probably classic cmp. I would check there. Probably the same metallic contact issue you find in many old keyboards, like the SOL and Tandy 8" systems.
          Thanks for the update.
          Bill
        • Jeffrey Brace
          From: Mike Loewen Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 9:31 PM ... Sounds Great Mike ! I will order the 226 gram bucket and put it on *your* tab ;) Jeff Brace
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 25, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            From: Mike Loewen
            Sent: Sunday, November 25, 2012 9:31 PM


            >> will all work and be reliable. If anyone knows what kind of metal it is
            >> and where I can buy it, then I would appreciate it !

            >How about something like this?

            >http://store.caig.com/s.nl/it.A/id.1626/.f?sc=2&category=41

            Sounds Great Mike ! I will order the 226 gram bucket and put it on *your*
            tab ;)

            Jeff Brace
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.