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APL @ 50 Event in Toronto

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  • joshbensadon
    Today I learned much about APL at the York University APL@50 Event. I met and had fun talking with Mers Kutt, the inventor of the MCM/70 PC back in 1972.
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012
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      Today I learned much about APL at the York University APL@50 Event.
      I met and had fun talking with Mers Kutt, the inventor of the MCM/70 PC back in 1972.

      Zbigniew Stachniak organized the event for the most part as follows:

      10:00 Stachniak opens the event.
      10:15 Jeffry Shallit speaks about the power of APL which explains why he still uses it every day.
      10:45 Eric Iverson shares stories about his family's history and his fathers passion to teach which led to the development of APL in 1962
      11:30 Gordon Ramer shares his stories about implementing APL on IBM/360's and his use of APL on several other systems.
      12:30 Lunch break, Not APL related.
      1:45 Caherin Lathwell shares a sample screening of her video about K. Iversons book, A Programming Language. Movie to come out in 2015.
      2:00 Jim Brown talks about the progression of APL2 and J, how decisions were made to build on the language without changing it's pleasant "shape".
      2:45 All 5 speakers formed a panel to discuss the world of APL, past, present and future.

      Please see pictures in the picture section, in my folder Josh Bensadon.

      In the Panel Picture, the names are from left to right,
      E. Iverson, J. Brown, G. Ramer, John, J. Shallit

      I did not see Mers Kutt in the first half of the event, but he came in just before Jim Browns session and sat down right beside me! I was very pleased and amazed to be talking with this pioneer of early PC's. His passion for these systems is very much alive to this day. He believes there is not enough being done to keep APL thriving and would like to see it rise to show all its power again.

      I'm sorry I did not take enough care to better document the event. However, I do believe Zbigniew did what he could to record it.

      I don't know who Edsger Dijkstra is, or why he wrote "APL is a mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new generation of coding bums." In fact, he was quoted a few times with negative comments. Does anyone have anything nice to say about him? Who was he?

      I'll see about finding a recording of the event for the group.

      Cheers,
      Josh
    • Dave McGuire
      ... [much awesomeness snipped] ... ! Dijkstra was perhaps one of the most influential figures in computer science of all time. He was a Turing Award
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 1, 2012
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        On 11/01/2012 08:17 PM, joshbensadon wrote:
        > Today I learned much about APL at the York University APL@50 Event.

        [much awesomeness snipped]

        > I don't know who Edsger Dijkstra is, or why he wrote "APL is a
        > mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the
        > future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new
        > generation of coding bums." In fact, he was quoted a few times with
        > negative comments. Does anyone have anything nice to say about him?
        > Who was he?

        !

        Dijkstra was perhaps one of the most influential figures in computer
        science of all time. He was a Turing Award recipient, and invented the
        now-ubiquitous concept of the "semaphore" in computer programming,
        amongst lots and lots and lots of other stuff.

        Important guy. He died about ten years ago.

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA
      • Systems Glitch
        He s also responsible for Dijkstra s shortest path algorithm, which plays an important part in modern network routing. The algorithm was published in the 50 s
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 2, 2012
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          He's also responsible for Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which plays an important part in modern network routing. The algorithm was published in the 50's and is still implemented in /senior level/ computer science courses nowadays.

          Thanks,
          Jonathan

          On Thu, 01 Nov 2012 20:25:25 -0400
          Dave McGuire <Mcguire@...> wrote:

          > On 11/01/2012 08:17 PM, joshbensadon wrote:
          > > Today I learned much about APL at the York University APL@50 Event.
          >
          > [much awesomeness snipped]
          >
          > > I don't know who Edsger Dijkstra is, or why he wrote "APL is a
          > > mistake, carried through to perfection. It is the language of the
          > > future for the programming techniques of the past: it creates a new
          > > generation of coding bums." In fact, he was quoted a few times with
          > > negative comments. Does anyone have anything nice to say about him?
          > > Who was he?
          >
          > !
          >
          > Dijkstra was perhaps one of the most influential figures in computer
          > science of all time. He was a Turing Award recipient, and invented the
          > now-ubiquitous concept of the "semaphore" in computer programming,
          > amongst lots and lots and lots of other stuff.
          >
          > Important guy. He died about ten years ago.
          >
          > -Dave
          >
          > --
          > Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
          > New Kensington, PA
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
        • dfnr2
          ... Also, perhaps the earliest denoucer of the GOTO statement (in high level languages); proponent of structured programming, likely contributing to the
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 3, 2012
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            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Systems Glitch <systems.glitch@...> wrote:
            >
            > He's also responsible for Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm, which plays an important part in modern network routing. The algorithm was published in the 50's and is still implemented in /senior level/ computer science courses nowadays.
            >

            Also, perhaps the earliest denoucer of the GOTO statement (in high level languages); proponent of structured programming, likely contributing to the dominance of the Algol-derived progamming languages which predominate today's compiled program landscape; an early explorer of concurrent programming; and one of the most prolific computer enthusiasts and authors to date.

            Dave
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