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Re: [midatlanticretro] OT: Too quiet

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  • B. Degnan
    ... and scroll to the table at the bottom. It shows the amount of messages every month since we started in January 2005. ... weeks of existence. Maybe a couple
    Message 1 of 31 , Oct 11, 2012
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      > It's interesting to visit http://groups.yahoo.com/group/midatlanticretro
      and scroll to the table at the bottom. It shows the amount of messages
      every month since we started in January 2005.
      >
      > There were also a few messages via regular email for our first couple of
      weeks of existence. Maybe a couple of dozen. They discussed group logistics
      and planning for the Trenton show. It's impressive that most of the
      founding members are still active -- such as me, Andy Meyer, Bill Degnan,
      Bill Sudbrink, and David Gesswein -- apologies to anyone I'm forgetting
      right now. Scott A., Herb, Donzelli, Scheef, Roganti perhaps?


      Kelly Leavitt
    • Bill Dromgoole
      ... Yes, In my opinion you are correct. In the early years of semiconductors most parts have three digit date codes. You have to know the approximate decade
      Message 31 of 31 , Oct 18, 2012
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        >
        > Here's a transistor with 430 on it. Would that make it 1964, week 30?
        > Transistor part number is 2N1218. Or does the 430 refer to the factory the
        > transistor was made? or other?
        >
        > Photo of transistor posted in the photos/Josh Bensadon folder of this group.
        >
        > I've seen some IC's with only a 3 digit code on them (not part of this analog
        > computer). Case in point is the following:
        >
        > CD4023BE
        > RCA H 650
        >
        > Is that to mean 1976 week 50?
        > H being the factory where it was made?
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Josh
        > ------------------------------------

        Yes, In my opinion you are correct.
        In the early years of semiconductors most parts have three digit date codes.
        You have to know the approximate decade the part was first produced to get the
        correct date.

        Sometimes you have trouble telling the part number apart from the date code.
        In the 1970s a lot of the 7400 series ic's had date codes like 7414 and a part
        number like 7404.
        I was always having trouble with those.

        A good history of early transitor marking can be found here.
        http://transistorhistory.50webs.com/index.html

        billdrom
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