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Navy video from 1962 about computers

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  • Christian Liendo
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDQROzrFD1o The only film so far found in the AT&T Archives, and posted here, that was NOT made by AT&T or any of the company s
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 22, 2012
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      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDQROzrFD1o


      The only film so far found in the AT&T Archives, and posted here, that was NOT made by AT&T or any of the company's subsidiaries. However, this film was part of the Bell Labs film library, a resource utilized by Labs engineers. This film was made by the U.S. Navy in order to explain the simplest elements of computers and how they worked.

      Digital Computer Techniques was a film series introduction to the essential elements of computer and how they worked. The series was made by Audio Productions, Inc., a company that made a lot of films for the Bell System as well. Here's what the entire series consisted of at the time:

      * Digital Computer Techniques: Introduction (the film posted here) This gives a history of what kind of counting devices led to the creation of a computer; from fingers to stones to slide rules. In this film, the word "computer" seems to still be about number crunching.
      * Digital Computer Techniques: Computer Logic Part I The binary number system, logic as it is applied to computers, what "code" is.
      * Digital Computer Techniques: Computer Logic Part II, Symbology (also called "Logic Element Circuits") Explains transistors, AND, OR, NOR, INVERTER and FLIP-FLOP gates. Shows how circuits affect binary signals to produce output.
      * Digital Computer Techniques: Computer Units Explains the 5 parts of a computer—i.e. input, storage, control, output, and arithmetic, as well as what sequencing, clocking and timing have to do with the processing.
      * Digital Computer Techniques: Programming Explains programming via the use of flow charts and symbols, and what computer language is.

      Note: As this film was made by the U.S. Navy, and at the time one of the Navy's star computer experts was then-Commander Grace Hopper, one hopes for a cameo... sadly, she's not here, in the introduction film, at least.

      Footage Courtesy of AT&T Archives and History Center, Warren, NJ
    • Evan Koblentz
      ... That s because she was a full-time employee of Univac from 50 to the mid-60s. (I forget the exact years.)
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 22, 2012
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        >> As this film was made by the U.S. Navy, and at the time one of the Navy's star computer experts was then-Commander Grace Hopper

        That's because she was a full-time employee of Univac from '50 to the mid-60s. (I forget the exact years.)
      • system@great-escape.tmesis.com
        ... I was lucky enough to meet her too!
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 22, 2012
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          "Evan Koblentz" <evan@...> writes:

          >>> As this film was made by the U.S. Navy, and at the time one of the
          >Navy's star computer experts was then-Commander Grace Hopper

          I was lucky enough to meet her too!
        • RonK
          Ah! Those were the good old days... When a Computer was a computer! And you could actually repair them! Now, it s a different story. See:
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 25, 2012
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            Ah! Those were the good old days... When a Computer was a computer! And you could actually repair them! Now, it's a different story. See:

            http://cnettv.cnet.com/five-ways-manufacturers-make-devices-hard-repair/9742-1_53-50129591.html

            Makes you wonder how our museum will be able to keep the new stuff going in the future.


            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, system@... wrote:
            >
            > "Evan Koblentz" <evan@...> writes:
            >
            > >>> As this film was made by the U.S. Navy, and at the time one of the
            > >Navy's star computer experts was then-Commander Grace Hopper
            >
            > I was lucky enough to meet her too!
            >
          • Neil Cherry
            ... Sorry couldn t watch the video, too many things to unblock (yes I use adblock). The future museum will be much like what we have today but with newer
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 25, 2012
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              On 08/25/2012 10:04 AM, RonK wrote:

              > Ah! Those were the good old days... When a Computer was a computer! And you could actually
              > repair them! Now, it's a different story. See:

              Sorry couldn't watch the video, too many things to unblock (yes I use
              adblock).

              The future museum will be much like what we have today but with 'newer'
              things. Today's makers can replace and repair complex systems with
              complex technology. We can make our own replacement FPGAs for some
              of the technology when it fails. This is why you see things like
              the XBox & PS3 being hacked. People figure it out, when it suites
              their needs.

              Don't mistake my disappointment that some vendors make their products
              non-repairable on purpose (because it's part of their business model).
              Also I don't know where the line needs to be drawn for what is retro
              and what is not when the only way to save something is to repair it
              with modern (non-retro) technology.

              --
              Linux Home Automation Neil Cherry ncherry@...
              http://www.linuxha.com/ Main site
              http://linuxha.blogspot.com/ My HA Blog
              Author of: Linux Smart Homes For Dummies
            • Dave Wade
              ... I think its getting harder. I have just thrown out some Digital TV boxes because the software isn t upgradable. There is no documentation available on-line
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 25, 2012
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                On 25/08/2012 15:24, Neil Cherry wrote:
                > On 08/25/2012 10:04 AM, RonK wrote:
                >
                >> Ah! Those were the good old days... When a Computer was a computer! And you could actually
                >> repair them! Now, it's a different story. See:
                > Sorry couldn't watch the video, too many things to unblock (yes I use
                > adblock).
                >
                > The future museum will be much like what we have today but with 'newer'
                > things. Today's makers can replace and repair complex systems with
                > complex technology. We can make our own replacement FPGAs for some
                > of the technology when it fails. This is why you see things like
                > the XBox & PS3 being hacked. People figure it out, when it suites
                > their needs.
                >
                > Don't mistake my disappointment that some vendors make their products
                > non-repairable on purpose (because it's part of their business model).
                > Also I don't know where the line needs to be drawn for what is retro
                > and what is not when the only way to save something is to repair it
                > with modern (non-retro) technology.
                >
                I think its getting harder. I have just thrown out some Digital TV boxes
                because the software isn't upgradable. There is no documentation
                available on-line and the supplier won't supply updated software. The
                boxes no longer work as in the UK we have recently changed the
                modulation. In fact any one who had migrated to the first Digital TV
                service has had to upgrade a second time so thousands of boxes must have
                been skipped. I even have a Digital TV recorder which is also going to
                be skipped as it stutters. And before any one asks there are virtually
                no components worth salvaging in the boxes. Almost all the brains is on
                a large single chip.

                I also have a fully functioning MP3 player which also being skipped.
                This time its the battery that has failed and I can't get one that will
                fit in the space in the case. I could put one outside but that defeats
                the whole object of the case.

                --
                Dave Wade G4UGM
                Illegitimi Non Carborundum

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