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Re: [midatlanticretro] 8051

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  • Dave McGuire
    ... Ohhh yes. More variants than even in the ARM7 ecosystem, it seems. My favorite from the Old Days(tm) was the Philips 87C751; a windowed skinny-dip package
    Message 1 of 55 , Mar 29, 2012
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      On 03/26/2012 06:42 AM, josh6502 wrote:
      >> I love 8051s. I've done lots of stuff with them, I have
      >> gazillions of them (both "classic" and modern variants...lots!) and
      >> really enjoy working with them. A lot of people don't like their
      >> architecture but I don't really understand how they feel that way;
      >> I think it works very well, is easy to understand, and is overall
      >> very nicely done.
      >>
      >> I cut my teeth on PDP-11s and Z80s though.
      >
      > I love the 8051's too. After the 1802, they were the next processor
      > I was using. I thought it was wonderful to have a serial port,
      > parallel port, eprom all bundled together in the 8751H chip. Then
      > came all the variants... lots and lots of variants!

      Ohhh yes. More variants than even in the ARM7 ecosystem, it seems.
      My favorite from the Old Days(tm) was the Philips 87C751; a windowed
      skinny-dip package with an on-chip I2C controller. There exists some
      pretty decent (if I do say so myself) hardware in use in the US Military
      today that is running my firmware on those chips.

      Later, having turned into quite a fan of Philips (erm, "NXP" now), I
      totally fell in love with the P89C66x family. Fantastic chips, lots of
      on-chip I/O controllers and lots (for an mcs51) RAM. I ported John
      Katausky's BASIC interpreter (the one used in the 8052AH-BASIC
      masked-ROM chip) to the P89C66x subfamily and extended it quite a bit.
      Great stuff.

      SDCC is perhaps the most popular free C compiler for the mcs51. It
      is very good. I host the build farm for it here on my network. It was
      the least I could do to help when the SourceForge build farm went away,
      as I put food on the table using that compiler for several years in the
      early 2000s.

      > I liked the bit mapped section but I wished there was an indexed
      > methode of getting the bits. Like MOV C,@R0 Where R0 pointed to all
      > the bit addressable spaces.

      Oh yes, that would've been handy! That bit-addressable space sure is
      handy just as it is, though.

      > I even built my own programmer for this chip, but later replaced it
      > with a commercial unit after being fed up having to rewrite my
      > drivers for every new chip. I learned the value of outsourcing!

      I got sick of messing with those sorts of problems and finally broke
      down and bought a big Data I/O UniSite, complete with a big fat hard
      drive, and found someone who can regularly get new software for it.
      I've had no problems reading or programming pretty much any device since
      then. "Nuke the site from orbit; it's the only way to be sure."

      -Dave

      --
      Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
      New Kensington, PA
    • Dave McGuire
      ... Ohhh yes. More variants than even in the ARM7 ecosystem, it seems. My favorite from the Old Days(tm) was the Philips 87C751; a windowed skinny-dip package
      Message 55 of 55 , Mar 29, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        On 03/26/2012 06:42 AM, josh6502 wrote:
        >> I love 8051s. I've done lots of stuff with them, I have
        >> gazillions of them (both "classic" and modern variants...lots!) and
        >> really enjoy working with them. A lot of people don't like their
        >> architecture but I don't really understand how they feel that way;
        >> I think it works very well, is easy to understand, and is overall
        >> very nicely done.
        >>
        >> I cut my teeth on PDP-11s and Z80s though.
        >
        > I love the 8051's too. After the 1802, they were the next processor
        > I was using. I thought it was wonderful to have a serial port,
        > parallel port, eprom all bundled together in the 8751H chip. Then
        > came all the variants... lots and lots of variants!

        Ohhh yes. More variants than even in the ARM7 ecosystem, it seems.
        My favorite from the Old Days(tm) was the Philips 87C751; a windowed
        skinny-dip package with an on-chip I2C controller. There exists some
        pretty decent (if I do say so myself) hardware in use in the US Military
        today that is running my firmware on those chips.

        Later, having turned into quite a fan of Philips (erm, "NXP" now), I
        totally fell in love with the P89C66x family. Fantastic chips, lots of
        on-chip I/O controllers and lots (for an mcs51) RAM. I ported John
        Katausky's BASIC interpreter (the one used in the 8052AH-BASIC
        masked-ROM chip) to the P89C66x subfamily and extended it quite a bit.
        Great stuff.

        SDCC is perhaps the most popular free C compiler for the mcs51. It
        is very good. I host the build farm for it here on my network. It was
        the least I could do to help when the SourceForge build farm went away,
        as I put food on the table using that compiler for several years in the
        early 2000s.

        > I liked the bit mapped section but I wished there was an indexed
        > methode of getting the bits. Like MOV C,@R0 Where R0 pointed to all
        > the bit addressable spaces.

        Oh yes, that would've been handy! That bit-addressable space sure is
        handy just as it is, though.

        > I even built my own programmer for this chip, but later replaced it
        > with a commercial unit after being fed up having to rewrite my
        > drivers for every new chip. I learned the value of outsourcing!

        I got sick of messing with those sorts of problems and finally broke
        down and bought a big Data I/O UniSite, complete with a big fat hard
        drive, and found someone who can regularly get new software for it.
        I've had no problems reading or programming pretty much any device since
        then. "Nuke the site from orbit; it's the only way to be sure."

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA
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