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Need 8080 assembler

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  • joshbensadon
    Hi, Can anyone suggest a free 8080 assembler? I ve tried the AS80 program, it works great for Z80 code but it does not seem to accept 8080 mnemonics. Thanks,
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 26, 2012
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      Hi,

      Can anyone suggest a free 8080 assembler? I've tried the AS80 program, it works great for Z80 code but it does not seem to accept 8080 mnemonics.

      Thanks,
      Josh
    • Dave McGuire
      ... For what platform? CP/M s ASM eats mcs80 mnemonics. I m pretty sure I have a good one for RT-11 as well. -Dave -- Dave McGuire, AK4HZ New Kensington, PA
      Message 2 of 13 , Mar 26, 2012
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        On 03/26/2012 10:10 PM, joshbensadon wrote:
        > Can anyone suggest a free 8080 assembler? I've tried the AS80
        > program, it works great for Z80 code but it does not seem to accept
        > 8080 mnemonics.

        For what platform? CP/M's ASM eats mcs80 mnemonics. I'm pretty sure
        I have a good one for RT-11 as well.

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
        New Kensington, PA
      • Josh Bensadon
        Hi Dave,   I guess I should have said a cross assembler for the PC DOS or Windows platform. That s what the AS80 is.   I would love to do in CP/M but I
        Message 3 of 13 , Mar 26, 2012
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          Hi Dave,
           
          I guess I should have said a cross assembler for the PC DOS or Windows platform.
          That's what the AS80 is.
           
          I would love to do in CP/M but I don't have CP/M running yet... I'm working towards that.
          I just finished writing a quick and simple routine to format the disk(s).  Now I need to assemble it, load it into the IMSAI and hope it works.
           
          When I get this working, I'll be able to continue my testing of reading/writing sectors then get CP/M figured out for the the first 2 tracks and hopefully I can make my boot disk.
           
          I might just give in to AS80 and convert all the 8080 to Z80 mnemonics.
           
          Cheers,
          Josh


          --- On Mon, 3/26/12, Dave McGuire <Mcguire@...> wrote:

          From: Dave McGuire <Mcguire@...>
          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Need 8080 assembler
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Received: Monday, March 26, 2012, 7:22 PM

          On 03/26/2012 10:10 PM, joshbensadon wrote:
          > Can anyone suggest a free 8080 assembler?  I've tried the AS80
          > program, it works great for Z80 code but it does not seem to accept
          > 8080 mnemonics.

             For what platform?  CP/M's ASM eats mcs80 mnemonics.  I'm pretty sure
          I have a good one for RT-11 as well.

                     -Dave

          --
          Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
          New Kensington, PA


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        • Dave McGuire
          ... Ahh ok. No clue for Windows. I can t imagine there s no DOS cross-assembler that speaks 8080 mnemonics, though. Weird. ... Great! Good luck with that.
          Message 4 of 13 , Mar 26, 2012
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            On 03/27/2012 01:16 AM, Josh Bensadon wrote:
            > I guess I should have said a cross assembler for the PC DOS or Windows
            > platform.
            > That's what the AS80 is.

            Ahh ok. No clue for Windows. I can't imagine there's no DOS
            cross-assembler that speaks 8080 mnemonics, though. Weird.

            > I would love to do in CP/M but I don't have CP/M running yet... I'm
            > working towards that.
            > I just finished writing a quick and simple routine to format the
            > disk(s). Now I need to assemble it, load it into the IMSAI and hope it
            > works.

            Great! Good luck with that. I'll be doing the same thing hopefully
            within the next few months, though my IMSAI is only an "IMSAI" due to
            the chassis; it's populated by entirely non-IMSAI boards. It was my
            primary system back in the early 1980s, but the big box of 8" floppies
            that contained all of my BIOS hacking and tons of other stuff I wrote
            was lost long ago. :-( So it'll be a slightly familiar porting effort
            when I resurrect it.

            > When I get this working, I'll be able to continue my testing of
            > reading/writing sectors then get CP/M figured out for the the first 2
            > tracks and hopefully I can make my boot disk.

            Keep us posted!

            > I might just give in to AS80 and convert all the 8080 to Z80 mnemonics.

            That sounds like a good plan.

            Another possibility might be to run CP/M under simh just to use the
            toolchain. That approach has the advantage of being quick and easy to
            set up.

            -Dave

            --
            Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
            New Kensington, PA
          • Richard Cini
            There is a cross-assembler for DOS that happily runs in a window under Windows -- TASM 3 (Table Assembler, not Borland TASM). Its what I use for all of my
            Message 5 of 13 , Mar 27, 2012
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              There is a cross-assembler for DOS that happily runs in a window under Windows -- TASM 3 (Table Assembler, not Borland TASM). Its what I use for all of my 8080/Z80/6502 coding. You have to use the 8085 switch to get 8080 but clearly you can't use 85-specific instructions and have it work on the 80.

              There are also good assemblers for the z80 and certainly you can use MyZ80 emulator under Windows to get a cpm 2.2 environment so you can work in the "real" tools.

              Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

              From: Dave McGuire <Mcguire@...>
              Sender: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2012 01:24:18 -0400
              To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
              ReplyTo: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Need 8080 assembler

               

              On 03/27/2012 01:16 AM, Josh Bensadon wrote:
              > I guess I should have said a cross assembler for the PC DOS or Windows
              > platform.
              > That's what the AS80 is.

              Ahh ok. No clue for Windows. I can't imagine there's no DOS
              cross-assembler that speaks 8080 mnemonics, though. Weird.

              > I would love to do in CP/M but I don't have CP/M running yet... I'm
              > working towards that.
              > I just finished writing a quick and simple routine to format the
              > disk(s). Now I need to assemble it, load it into the IMSAI and hope it
              > works.

              Great! Good luck with that. I'll be doing the same thing hopefully
              within the next few months, though my IMSAI is only an "IMSAI" due to
              the chassis; it's populated by entirely non-IMSAI boards. It was my
              primary system back in the early 1980s, but the big box of 8" floppies
              that contained all of my BIOS hacking and tons of other stuff I wrote
              was lost long ago. :-( So it'll be a slightly familiar porting effort
              when I resurrect it.

              > When I get this working, I'll be able to continue my testing of
              > reading/writing sectors then get CP/M figured out for the the first 2
              > tracks and hopefully I can make my boot disk.

              Keep us posted!

              > I might just give in to AS80 and convert all the 8080 to Z80 mnemonics.

              That sounds like a good plan.

              Another possibility might be to run CP/M under simh just to use the
              toolchain. That approach has the advantage of being quick and easy to
              set up.

              -Dave

              --
              Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
              New Kensington, PA

            • Josh Bensadon
              Hi Rich,   You are bang on.  Of course the sad part here is that I already have a copy of Table Assembler and I don t really mean to be wasting people s time
              Message 6 of 13 , Mar 27, 2012
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                Hi Rich,
                 
                You are bang on.  Of course the sad part here is that I already have a copy of Table Assembler and I don't really mean to be wasting people's time asking foolish questions I already have the answers to. 
                 
                The version I have is 2.7.6, it works just fine, once you put a dot in front of the EQU directive.  The 8085 code, from what I've read, is the exact same as 8080 but with 2 extra instructions "SIM" and "RIM".
                 
                Oh, btw, I even found a copy of the book you mentioned, The Programmers CP/M Handbook, on my self.  I guess it's time to come clean here...
                 
                Hello, (standing) my name is Josh Bensadon and I am a pack rat.
                I just can't seem to throw away anything and I love collecting this stuff!
                 
                If there ever was an AA for computer collectors... MARCH wouldn't be that.
                 
                Cheers,
                Josh
                 


                --- On Tue, 3/27/12, Richard Cini <rich.cini@...> wrote:

                From: Richard Cini <rich.cini@...>
                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Need 8080 assembler
                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                Received: Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 3:12 AM



                There is a cross-assembler for DOS that happily runs in a window under Windows -- TASM 3 (Table Assembler, not Borland TASM). Its what I use for all of my 8080/Z80/6502 coding. You have to use the 8085 switch to get 8080 but clearly you can't use 85-specific instructions and have it work on the 80.

                There are also good assemblers for the z80 and certainly you can use MyZ80 emulator under Windows to get a cpm 2.2 environment so you can work in the "real" tools.

                Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

                From: Dave McGuire <Mcguire@...>
                Sender: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tue, 27 Mar 2012 01:24:18 -0400
                To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
                ReplyTo: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Need 8080 assembler

                 
                On 03/27/2012 01:16 AM, Josh Bensadon wrote:
                > I guess I should have said a cross assembler for the PC DOS or Windows
                > platform.
                > That's what the AS80 is.

                Ahh ok. No clue for Windows. I can't imagine there's no DOS
                cross-assembler that speaks 8080 mnemonics, though. Weird.

                > I would love to do in CP/M but I don't have CP/M running yet... I'm
                > working towards that.
                > I just finished writing a quick and simple routine to format the
                > disk(s). Now I need to assemble it, load it into the IMSAI and hope it
                > works.

                Great! Good luck with that. I'll be doing the same thing hopefully
                within the next few months, though my IMSAI is only an "IMSAI" due to
                the chassis; it's populated by entirely non-IMSAI boards. It was my
                primary system back in the early 1980s, but the big box of 8" floppies
                that contained all of my BIOS hacking and tons of other stuff I wrote
                was lost long ago. :-( So it'll be a slightly familiar porting effort
                when I resurrect it.

                > When I get this working, I'll be able to continue my testing of
                > reading/writing sectors then get CP/M figured out for the the first 2
                > tracks and hopefully I can make my boot disk.

                Keep us posted!

                > I might just give in to AS80 and convert all the 8080 to Z80 mnemonics.

                That sounds like a good plan.

                Another possibility might be to run CP/M under simh just to use the
                toolchain. That approach has the advantage of being quick and easy to
                set up.

                -Dave

                --
                Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                New Kensington, PA


              • Systems Glitch
                ... Mostly. There are some undocumented 8085 instructions that, IIRC, pretty much every 8085 supports. Your assembler may or may not actually support those,
                Message 7 of 13 , Mar 27, 2012
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                  > The version I have is 2.7.6, it works just fine, once you put a dot in front of the EQU directive.  The 8085 code, from what I've read, is the exact same as 8080 but with 2 extra instructions "SIM" and "RIM".

                  Mostly. There are some undocumented 8085 instructions that, IIRC, pretty much every 8085 supports. Your assembler may or may not actually support those, but as long as you don't use them you'll be fine. Everything else is 100% object- and source-compatible.

                  FWIW, I use gnusim8085 under Linux to play around with bits of 8080/8085 ASM when I'm away from my Kaypro. It's somewhat lacking as an assembler, but it's alright for testing little snippets of code. I'll likely be getting into Microsoft's MACRO-80 under CP/M for finishing up my 8080/8085 monitor.

                  Thanks,
                  Jonathan
                • joshbensadon
                  ... Kinda sounds like Easter Eggs. I often hear of undocumented instructions. I guess they are put in there but not thoughally tested before documentation
                  Message 8 of 13 , Mar 27, 2012
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                    > Mostly. There are some undocumented 8085 instructions that, IIRC, pretty much every 8085 supports. Your assembler may or may not actually support those, but as long as you don't use them you'll be fine. Everything else is 100% object- and source-compatible.

                    Kinda sounds like Easter Eggs. I often hear of undocumented instructions. I guess they are put in there but not thoughally tested before documentation and product release. Why else would they not get disclosed?

                    > FWIW, I use gnusim8085 under Linux to play around with bits of 8080/8085 ASM when I'm away from my Kaypro. It's somewhat lacking as an assembler, but it's alright for testing little snippets of code. I'll likely be getting into Microsoft's MACRO-80 under CP/M for finishing up my 8080/8085 monitor.
                    >
                    > Thanks,
                    > Jonathan


                    Please tell me more about your 8080/8085 Monitor. I've been thinking of writting something myself to control/run the IMSAI via serial port.
                    I have something written for the 1802, but it's just a basic Dump/Edit/Upload/Run sort of thing.
                    Let me know what you've got and perhaps if it's in line with where I want to go, perhaps we can work on it together somehow.

                    Cheers,
                    Josh
                  • Systems Glitch
                    ... From what I ve read, that s pretty much exactly the case with the 8085. ... My 8080/8085 monitor project was intended to be mostly used with my 8085 SBC:
                    Message 9 of 13 , Mar 28, 2012
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                      > Kinda sounds like Easter Eggs. I often hear of undocumented instructions. I guess they are put in there but not thoughally tested before documentation and product release. Why else would they not get disclosed?

                      From what I've read, that's pretty much exactly the case with the 8085.

                      > Please tell me more about your 8080/8085 Monitor. I've been thinking of writting something myself to control/run the IMSAI via serial port.
                      > I have something written for the 1802, but it's just a basic Dump/Edit/Upload/Run sort of thing.
                      > Let me know what you've got and perhaps if it's in line with where I want to go, perhaps we can work on it together somehow.

                      My 8080/8085 monitor project was intended to be mostly used with my 8085 SBC:

                      http://www.glitchwrks.com/8085projects (needs updated, working on a site recode!)

                      I intend for it to be a full-featured generic monitor, mostly for storage in ROM. I want to structure it so that all system-dependant I/O routines are stored in machine-specific modules, while the base command processor is in its own module -- kind of like Kermit-80 and its binary overlays for various CP/M systems. That should make it easy to extend to different target systems, including a CP/M based monitor.

                      Right now, I have a very basic command processor, a la NorthStar's ROM monitor. It waits for a byte from your defined char input device, does some compares, and branches if the received byte matches a known command (outputs an error if no match). I've got I/O commands coded -- they dynamically create I/O port read/write instructions in RAM and execute them. I've also got a rudimentary memory dump coded that produces hex-formatted lines of 16 bytes of RAM.

                      I'd be happy to share the code with you and work on the project together! I can set up a GitHub repository for the code (heh, probably the only 8080 ASM there!) to ease version management/concurrent development. Anyone else who wants to join in the fun is welcome as well!

                      Thanks,
                      Jonathan
                    • joshbensadon
                      ... That would make it much more portable. Rewrite some bios and it s ready to run anywhere. Would bios be needed for anything other than I/O? ... Sure, I d
                      Message 10 of 13 , Mar 28, 2012
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                        > My 8080/8085 monitor project was intended to be mostly used with my 8085 SBC:
                        >
                        > http://www.glitchwrks.com/8085projects (needs updated, working on a site recode!)
                        >
                        > I intend for it to be a full-featured generic monitor, mostly for storage in ROM. I want to structure it so that all system-dependant I/O routines are stored in machine-specific modules, while the base command processor is in its own module -- kind of like Kermit-80 and its binary overlays for various CP/M systems. That should make it easy to extend to different target systems, including a CP/M based monitor.

                        That would make it much more portable. Rewrite some bios and it's ready to run anywhere. Would bios be needed for anything other than I/O?

                        >
                        > Right now, I have a very basic command processor, a la NorthStar's ROM monitor. It waits for a byte from your defined char input device, does some compares, and branches if the received byte matches a known command (outputs an error if no match). I've got I/O commands coded -- they dynamically create I/O port read/write instructions in RAM and execute them. I've also got a rudimentary memory dump coded that produces hex-formatted lines of 16 bytes of RAM.
                        >
                        > I'd be happy to share the code with you and work on the project together! I can set up a GitHub repository for the code (heh, probably the only 8080 ASM there!) to ease version management/concurrent development. Anyone else who wants to join in the fun is welcome as well!
                        >
                        > Thanks,
                        > Jonathan

                        Sure, I'd love to try to use it on this IMSAI. I really need to get some better control of it, using the front switches is getting old.

                        Let's talk bios.. Does it need anything more than Get a character, Send a char, test for rx buffer full and test for tx buffer empty?
                      • Dave McGuire
                        ... Just to jump in here...The book by Andy Johnson-Laird? I bought a copy of that book new in the 80s, it is (IMO) absolutely indispensable for anyone doing
                        Message 11 of 13 , Mar 29, 2012
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                          On 03/27/2012 12:04 PM, Josh Bensadon wrote:
                          > Oh, btw, I even found a copy of the book you mentioned, The Programmers
                          > CP/M Handbook, on my self.

                          Just to jump in here...The book by Andy Johnson-Laird? I bought a
                          copy of that book new in the 80s, it is (IMO) absolutely indispensable
                          for anyone doing any BIOS-level CP/M hacking. It's great!

                          > I guess it's time to come clean here...
                          > Hello, (standing) my name is Josh Bensadon and I am a pack rat.
                          > I just can't seem to throw away anything and I love collecting this stuff!
                          > If there ever was an AA for computer collectors... MARCH wouldn't be that.

                          Alcoholism destroys lives and families...Vintage computerism only
                          destroys floor joists. ;)

                          -Dave

                          --
                          Dave McGuire, AK4HZ
                          New Kensington, PA
                        • Systems Glitch
                          ... Nope, though I ve been writing my I/O routines in such a way that I should be able to reuse them in a CP/M BIOS. ... Right now it doesn t even check for TX
                          Message 12 of 13 , Mar 30, 2012
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                            > That would make it much more portable. Rewrite some bios and it's ready to run anywhere. Would bios be needed for anything other than I/O?

                            Nope, though I've been writing my I/O routines in such a way that I should be able to reuse them in a CP/M BIOS.

                            > Let's talk bios.. Does it need anything more than Get a character, Send a char, test for rx buffer full and test for tx buffer empty?

                            Right now it doesn't even check for TX buffer empty! But yes, those are the main functions it needs. I'm not sure if I'm going to do hardcoded pacing or hardware flow control when I get around to coding up an XModem transfer routine.

                            The BIOS bit also includes a string output function, so that it can be replaced with a call to CP/M's string output routine in the CP/M version (I tend to develop using CP/M as a testbed).

                            Thanks,
                            Jonathan
                          • joshbensadon
                            I m really tempted to ask for your source so I can start adding to it. I am guessing you have already isolated these subs as bios. I would have a good look
                            Message 13 of 13 , Mar 30, 2012
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                              I'm really tempted to ask for your source so I can start adding to it. I am guessing you have already isolated these subs as bios. I would have a good look at your frame work and start adding parts I'd like to see & use. But... my hands are full with 8" drive problems as you know already and thanks for all your help with that!

                              --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Systems Glitch <systems.glitch@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > > That would make it much more portable. Rewrite some bios and it's ready to run anywhere. Would bios be needed for anything other than I/O?
                              >
                              > Nope, though I've been writing my I/O routines in such a way that I should be able to reuse them in a CP/M BIOS.
                              >
                              > > Let's talk bios.. Does it need anything more than Get a character, Send a char, test for rx buffer full and test for tx buffer empty?
                              >
                              > Right now it doesn't even check for TX buffer empty! But yes, those are the main functions it needs. I'm not sure if I'm going to do hardcoded pacing or hardware flow control when I get around to coding up an XModem transfer routine.
                              >
                              > The BIOS bit also includes a string output function, so that it can be replaced with a call to CP/M's string output routine in the CP/M version (I tend to develop using CP/M as a testbed).
                              >
                              > Thanks,
                              > Jonathan
                              >
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