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Re: Retr0Bright

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  • BobShuster
    I ve used a Magic Eraser in the past (notably on a white MacBook) and while it does get marks off, it is definitely destructive as it takes the shine off of
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 22, 2012
      I've used a Magic Eraser in the past (notably on a white MacBook) and while it does get marks off, it is definitely destructive as it takes the shine off of the finish. I suppose if something has a matte finish already it would be ok.

      What I'm thinking about cleaning is beyond an "age" patina. This stuff is nasty, almost brown, and washing it does't work. Old TI94a, old Vic20, old C64, etc. I also want to try it on some yellowed white Lego parts.

      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Systems Glitch <systems.glitch@...> wrote:
      >
      > > I prefer to use the Magic Eraser, but then to follow up with soap and
      > > water. Retr0Bright will over time potentially make a problem
      > > worse. At least I want to see what 5 years after treatment looks
      > > like before I would try it intensely. But then I don't have any
      > > systems that I think would benefit from it.
      >
      > Yep, the Magic Eraser will get marker and scuffs off pretty well. And you don't have to worry about it melting plastic, which is definitely a worry with some of the solvents commonly used in cleaning up old computers.
      >
      > I've used Retr0Brite on a few things, mostly just to see if/how well it worked. I used it on a pair of Apple external disk drive cases (3.5" DSDD and 5.25" Apple II drive) and it worked just fine. I went with the liquid mix, not the gelled recipe, and ladled it over the parts in a Pyrex glass tray every few hours, under a standard 2-foot-long T12 blacklight. I also used 5% hydrogen peroxide rather than trying to find the stronger hair bleaching concentrations (note: 5% is still stronger than the stuff you use to clean cuts, which is 3%), which takes longer but lessens the chance that badly discolored plastic will bloom.
      >
      > Like Bill said, no one really knows what the long-term effects of using Retr0Brite on old plastics really is. For the most part, none of the vintage computers I use regularly have badly discolored plastic, or the discoloration just doesn't bother me. I wouldn't use it on something really unique/special, but it did make the cheap pair of badly discolored Apple disk drives I've got a much closer match to the Apple IIgs they go with!
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Jonathan
      >
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