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Vintage Computer Prices Re: More Price Check (Interact)

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  • Christian Liendo
    Vintage Computer Prices are not in the same league as Coins, Stamps, etc and so on.. I mean I wouldn t say there is a book value.. I find that they
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 27, 2011
      Vintage Computer Prices are not in the same league as Coins, Stamps, etc and so on..

      I mean I wouldn't say there is a "book" value..

      I find that they fluctuate, I have seen some Lisas go for less then before.

      I guess because all the people who wanted Lisas no have them, but Mac 128k and 512ks have risen sharply after jobs death.


      I have also noticed that more people are getting into the collecting part and not the hobby.

      As to say I see more people trying to make money off of it and less people having fun.

      I have a collection, if you figure what I pad and how much I have spent to house it..

      I have totally lost money, but it's fun.. I enjoy it and it's cheaper than therapy.
    • brian_cirulnick
      ... I think that s because there s more to go wrong with a Computer over time, while Stamps and Coins have fairly well documented value systems based on the
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 27, 2011
        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...> wrote:
        >
        > Vintage Computer Prices are not in the same league as Coins, Stamps, etc and so on..
        > I mean I wouldn't say there is a "book" value..

        I think that's because there's more to go wrong with a Computer over time, while Stamps and Coins have fairly well documented value systems based on the condition of the item.

        I think it's more akin to Classic Cars, where to really sell a proper "vintage" computer, you're going to need "documentation" to show the real history of the machine (computers with a historic story behind them will become more valuable over time), matching serial numbers, and a documented restoration history that shows that no unauthorized modifications were done, and the machine was restored to "stock".
      • B Degnan
        ... Exactly - *in general* vintage computing is reminiscent of hobbyists into classic cars and other things that are collectible but require some skill to
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 27, 2011
          At 01:47 PM 12/27/2011, you wrote:


          >--- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Christian Liendo
          ><christian_liendo@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Vintage Computer Prices are not in the same league as Coins,
          > Stamps, etc and so on..
          > > I mean I wouldn't say there is a "book" value..
          >
          >I think that's because there's more to go wrong with a Computer over
          >time, while Stamps and Coins have fairly well documented value
          >systems based on the condition of the item.
          >
          >I think it's more akin to Classic Cars, where to really sell a
          >proper "vintage" computer, you're going to need "documentation" to
          >show the real history of the machine (computers with a historic
          >story behind them will become more valuable over time), matching
          >serial numbers, and a documented restoration history that shows that
          >no unauthorized modifications were done, and the machine was
          >restored to "stock".

          Exactly - *in general* vintage computing is reminiscent of hobbyists
          into classic cars and other things that are collectible but require
          some skill to maintain (guns, clocks, radios...). Nothing is cut and
          dry though. The hobby has a lot of variety. Consider the people who
          collect only boxed software, computer chips, manufacturer-specific,
          date-specific, home systems, modems and comm equipment, magazines,
          minis, .... there's something for everyone.

          Bill
        • josh6502
          ... LoL at therapy. You bring up some interesting points. I guess we all like to do our own thing, but then to some extent, we like the same stuff. I seem to
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 27, 2011
            <christian_liendo@...> wrote:
            >
            > Vintage Computer Prices are not in the same league as Coins, Stamps, etc and so on..
            > I mean I wouldn't say there is a "book" value..
            > I find that they fluctuate
            > I guess because all the people who wanted Lisas no have them, but Mac 128k and 512ks have risen sharply after jobs death.
            >
            > I have also noticed that more people are getting into the collecting part and not the hobby.
            >
            > As to say I see more people trying to make money off of it and less people having fun.
            >
            > I have totally lost money, but it's fun.. I enjoy it and it's cheaper than therapy.

            LoL at therapy.

            You bring up some interesting points. I guess we all like to do our own thing, but then to some extent, we like the same stuff.

            I seem to like repairing these old machines. It's a lot of fun to see how they wired everything then to search for the faulty part(s).

            Someone suggested I write a video game for one of these old computers, but I just can't see that being a worth while venture. Unless it's writing Conway's Game of Life on a COSMAC ELF, which I did.

            Maybe this could be a mid life thing, as I am mostly interested in the computers which I could not afford while reading the ad's in Popular Electronics - 197x (1970's).

            I don't think there's much money in buying and selling, unless you are very lucky to find a cheap supply.

            What is Vintage Computer to you?
          • B Degnan
            There *is* money in vintage computing but you have to be sharp. -- Sent from my PDP 8/e.
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 27, 2011
              There *is* money in vintage computing but you have to be sharp.
              --
              Sent from my PDP 8/e.
            • brian_cirulnick
              ... I don t know that it s a mid-life thing for me (since I ve been doing this I was 20), but I also tend to gravitate towards the machines I could never have
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 28, 2011
                --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, josh6502 <no_reply@...> wrote:

                > Maybe this could be a mid life thing, as I am mostly interested in the computers which I could not afford while reading the ad's in Popular Electronics - 197x (1970's).
                >
                -------------------

                I don't know that it's a mid-life thing for me (since I've been doing this I was 20), but I also tend to gravitate towards the machines I could never have afforded when I was a C=64 guy.

                That's why I tend to have high-end SGI and SUN machines, or NeXT or Lisa, or anything else that was way out of my league when I was banging away on a Commodore with a measly 300 baud modem (I remember buying the DAK 1200 baud (which I still have), and thinking I was so ElYte!)

                With me it's always been about hand-me-down computers as well. Making do with less (which is why I USE the machines I have), as I remember fishing Macs out of dumpsters and rebuilding them as a method of free machines, or how I could never afford a new machine, so when everyone else "upgraded", I got their old leftovers, and was able to still get my work done -- which is how I ended up with an Amiga 1000 (still the best machine I've ever had).

                When a friend of mine and I started our own business, we did buy some new equipment (since we had to stay on the cutting edge), but on the "back-end", our file servers, BBS, and other stuff were mostly built from scavenged systems, odds and end that I pieced together to make work.

                And that's the fun part for me, which is probably why I've never given up this hobby.
              • Mike Loewen
                ... That s part of the appeal to me as well, obtaining machines that I could never afford. My Tandy 6000HD is a prime example. Other things that interest me
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 28, 2011
                  On Wed, 28 Dec 2011, brian_cirulnick wrote:

                  > I don't know that it's a mid-life thing for me (since I've been doing
                  > this I was 20), but I also tend to gravitate towards the machines I
                  > could never have afforded when I was a C=64 guy.

                  That's part of the appeal to me as well, obtaining machines that I
                  could never afford. My Tandy 6000HD is a prime example. Other things
                  that interest me are machines that I used back in the day, but didn't own.
                  Kaypros, for instance.


                  Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                  Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
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