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Re: OT: The future back in 1982

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  • Jeff Jonas
    ... Indeed, as one who saw several false starts and technological dead-ends, it s interesting to see the impact & ramifications of technology. The books The
    Message 1 of 14 , Jul 4, 2011
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      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Christian Liendo <christian_liendo@...> wrote:
      > Here is an article from 1982..
      > http://www.nytimes.com/1982/06/14/us/study-says-technology-could-transform-society.html
      > It was a study from called 'Teletext and Videotex in the United States"
      > It's a great read from a historical perspective.

      Indeed, as one who saw several false starts and technological dead-ends, it's interesting to see the impact & ramifications of technology. The books "The Victorian Internet" and "Wired Love" show how long distance instant communications had similar implications over 100 years ago!
    • Evan Koblentz
      ... distance instant communications had similar implications over 100 years ago! Never heard of Wired Love (sounds kinky!) but The Victorian Internet by
      Message 2 of 14 , Jul 4, 2011
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        >>> The books "The Victorian Internet" and "Wired Love" show how long
        distance instant communications had similar implications over 100 years ago!

        Never heard of "Wired Love" (sounds kinky!) but "The Victorian Internet"
        by Tom Standage is one of my favorite books. I highly recommend it to
        anyone who appreciates tech history.
      • Jeff Jonas
        ... Perhaps it was 130 yrs ago when morse code telegraphers were inventing tweeting and Twitter :-) Wired Love: A Romance Of Dots And Dashes (1880) by Ella
        Message 3 of 14 , Jul 6, 2011
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          >> The books "The Victorian Internet" and "Wired Love"
          >> show how long distance instant communications
          >> had similar implications over 100 years ago!

          > Never heard of "Wired Love" (sounds kinky!)

          Perhaps it was 130 yrs ago when morse code telegraphers
          were inventing tweeting and Twitter :-)

          Wired Love: A Romance Of Dots And Dashes (1880)
          by Ella Cheever Thayer

          One review mentioned getting a free e-copy
          since it's public domain.
          I heard a little of it read on NPR.

          It's a free Google e-book but I'm unsure how to list the URL without my personal ID showing. The ID field is required for it to work. Unless it's the book ID and not my ID, unsure :"/
        • darren_outatime
          I started reading Wired Love today and I have to admit it s pretty good so far. It has also sparked my interest in the history of telegraph messaging. A
          Message 4 of 14 , Jul 9, 2011
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            I started reading "Wired Love" today and I have to admit it's pretty good so far. It has also sparked my interest in the history of telegraph messaging.

            A downloadable copy can be found on the Project Gutenberg website: http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/24353

            Also, I was able to download an ebook copy of the book to read on my Apple Newton (other electronic formats are available as well, such as Kindle, Sony, Adobe PDF, RTF, etc): http://www.manybooks.net/titles/thayere2435324353.html

            Take care,
            Darren (outatime)


            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Jeff Jonas" <jeff_s_jonas@...> wrote:
            >
            > >> The books "The Victorian Internet" and "Wired Love"
            > >> show how long distance instant communications
            > >> had similar implications over 100 years ago!
            >
            > > Never heard of "Wired Love" (sounds kinky!)
            >
            > Perhaps it was 130 yrs ago when morse code telegraphers
            > were inventing tweeting and Twitter :-)
            >
            > Wired Love: A Romance Of Dots And Dashes (1880)
            > by Ella Cheever Thayer
            >
            > One review mentioned getting a free e-copy
            > since it's public domain.
            > I heard a little of it read on NPR.
            >
            > It's a free Google e-book but I'm unsure how to list the URL without my personal ID showing. The ID field is required for it to work. Unless it's the book ID and not my ID, unsure :"/
            >
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