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Re: Found some Core Memory

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  • s100doctor
    ... The brand name on the core board is Fabri-Tec . They manufactured cord planes for a number of memory board manufacturers. YOu ve got the cores but not the
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 2, 2011
      , Dan Roganti <ragooman@...> wrote:
      >
      > I found some Core memory. It's from the same guy who has the mylar
      > papertape. He gave me 2 core memory cards. He mentioned that he remembers
      > this coming from an IBM system. The really cool thing about this is that it
      > assembled in a way where it folds up. I have some pics here. I'm hoping to
      > find out what system this is from.

      The brand name on the core board is "Fabri-Tec". They manufactured cord planes for a number of memory board manufacturers. YOu've got the cores but not the drivers and receivers. This board would plug into a card set with those electronics.

      I suggest you note the model number and look at all the "core memory board" pictures you can until you find a match for that model number. Then you'll have an idea of what "drove" these core planes.

      I don't advise trying to build analog core memory read/write electronics. Ask me privately about it if you want, I think a better "deal" would be to trade it for a complete core memory board set.

      Herb Johnson
    • Dave McGuire
      ... Hey, it s finicky and fiddly, but it can be done (and has been), and there are many design examples out there. -Dave -- Dave McGuire Port Charlotte, FL
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 2, 2011
        On 6/2/11 7:54 PM, s100doctor wrote:
        > I don't advise trying to build analog core memory read/write
        > electronics. Ask me privately about it if you want, I think a better
        > "deal" would be to trade it for a complete core memory board set.

        Hey, it's finicky and fiddly, but it can be done (and has been), and
        there are many design examples out there.

        -Dave

        --
        Dave McGuire
        Port Charlotte, FL
      • Jeff Jonas
        ... But can they handle the temperate range as things heat up, and the density of the one being considered? The Arduino core project I saw recently is only 8 x
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 5, 2011
          > > I don't advise trying to build
          > > analog core memory read/write electronics ...

          > Hey, it's finicky and fiddly, but it can be done (and has been),
          > and there are many design examples out there.

          But can they handle the temperate range as things heat up,
          and the density of the one being considered?

          The Arduino core project I saw recently
          is only 8 x 8 and very sparsely populated.

          Yes, today's DSPs can do things
          that required dedicated hardware not long ago,
          but the algorithms and reliability looks tricky.
          If that's handled properly, I'd love to see the new ways!
        • Jeff Jonas
          ... The core I salvaged from the IBM 1620 and IBM 1130 were merely green frames that stacked together. No IBM anywhere. Even back then, IBM outsourced SOME
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 5, 2011
            > I would expect anything from IBM to say I B M on it somewhere.

            The core I salvaged from the IBM 1620 and IBM 1130
            were merely green frames that stacked together.
            No "IBM" anywhere.

            Even back then, IBM outsourced SOME things.
            The IBM system 1130's plotter is from Calcomp
            and the paper tape reader from Tally.
            The semiconductor RAM on the IBM system 38 is from EMM.

            > In those days, IBM made everything themselves,

            I wish I could find photos from the IBM Kingston facility's
            Historical Society. It showed a HUGE foot-locker sized
            core memory module for the IBM 360,
            with photos of all the steps of manufacturing, weaving
            and even re-weaving to replace a failed core!

            -- jeffj
          • Dave McGuire
            ... Core runs hot, sure, but this is well understood and easily handled. If Dan has trouble getting that core plane running, it won t be because it runs too
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 5, 2011
              On 6/5/11 6:46 AM, Jeff Jonas wrote:
              >>> I don't advise trying to build
              >>> analog core memory read/write electronics ...
              >
              >> Hey, it's finicky and fiddly, but it can be done (and has been),
              >> and there are many design examples out there.
              >
              > But can they handle the temperate range as things heat up,
              > and the density of the one being considered?

              Core runs hot, sure, but this is well understood and easily handled.
              If Dan has trouble getting that core plane running, it won't be
              because it runs too hot.

              > The Arduino core project I saw recently
              > is only 8 x 8 and very sparsely populated.

              The sparseness of that design surely had little to do with heat.

              > Yes, today's DSPs can do things
              > that required dedicated hardware not long ago,
              > but the algorithms and reliability looks tricky.
              > If that's handled properly, I'd love to see the new ways!

              Nah. Core is pretty reliable when you get a design running. Getting
              it to that point takes work, though. Most, if not all core systems have
              a thermistor near a core plane to adjust X/Y drive currents...I suppose
              one *could* do that with a DSP, but you'd be replacing a simple,
              easily-modeled circuit with maybe half a dozen transistors and a handful
              of resistors with a very complex chip and hundreds, if not thousands of
              lines of code.

              -Dave

              --
              Dave McGuire
              Port Charlotte, FL
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