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  • Evan Koblentz
    ... From: B Degnan Sender: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com Date: Tue, 31 May 2011 23:48:02 To:
    Message 1 of 2 , May 31 8:55 PM
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: B Degnan <billdeg@...>
      Sender: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tue, 31 May 2011 23:48:02
      To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
      Reply-To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: VCF exhibits / vendors

      It is going to happen, vintage computing is going to split some time
      soon into two generations. The 16/32 bit GUI era stuff will have a
      separate place, just not sure how it will work. On one hand we have
      pretty much covered the 70's stuff by now, very little new exhibits
      this year of first-time never seen before at a VCF systems. On the
      other hand, newer computers are less of a challenge, you rarely fix
      the innards, it's not the same hacker thing, at least to me.

      If you compare vintage computers to automobiles you can see how
      eventually they let in newer and newer cars each year. In the shows
      they section them like a giant dealership, with the really old ones
      in one spot, the newer ones elsewhere. There are far more newer
      ones. That's because there are always a few less of the older ones
      each year. If we don't allow for some sort of evolution, eventually
      we'll end up with fewer working systems to exhibit.

      To Mike's comment
      It's hard to justify (for me) classifying Amigas and Mac II's as OK
      and not also early Windows (386 at least) boxes, but clearly these
      are all next gen systems that have not been fully "vintage-ified"
      yet. It's a conversation we have every so often, and no one person
      is going to win their argument fully. Me? I welcome the opinions. I
      also have been saving the newer stuff too. What's going to happen
      eventually is that someone will organize a GUI-era vintage computer
      show and the floodgates will open to a new subset of the hobby. And
      that's where the younger people will come in as well.

      I do not wish to have a *what* is vintage debate, what year,
      etc. 16/32 bit computing is historic, it's just a question of how
      does one fit it into our "8-bit centric is the heart of vintage
      computing" world view. I have a feeling it will be a natural
      progression, a little grumbling, and then life moves on.



      Bill

      At 11:11 PM 5/31/2011, you wrote:
      >:) and I'm even going to reply with a top post.
      >
      >I'm sure you'd be excited to see a Packard Bell Legend "Multimedia"
      >486SX25 running windows 3.1 at a VCF :) It's at least 15 years vintage
      >now. We'll even get some Grollier's Encyclopedia 2x CD-ROM action
      >going. Get us some Prodigy dial up over quality built in 2400 baud
      >soft-modem-ish-thing.
      >
      >
      >
      >On 5/31/2011 9:41 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
      > >> I personally even believe at this point, early plain ol' x86
      > >> hardware, MS-DOS, and Windows can be relevant as any other vintage
      > >> computing.
      > >
      > >
      > > Damn it Mike ... I wasn't mad before, but now .... !!!! ;)
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------
      >
      >Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >



      ------------------------------------

      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • Evan Koblentz
      Doh ... sent my previous reply too soon ... thus an empty message. ... I disagree. But I strongly agree that it s wise to get young people interested in
      Message 2 of 2 , May 31 9:09 PM
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        Doh ... 'sent' my previous reply too soon ... thus an empty message.

        >>> vintage computing is going to split some time soon into two generations

        I disagree.

        But I strongly agree that it's wise to get young people interested in computer history, and I'm proud of what MARCH has done toward that so far. Jeff F. and Matt are great examples, as is Alex P. who did the Hero robot exhibit. For audiences even younger than them, we're building the "recent history" museum exhibit this summer. And at several other events (such as Maker Faire, NJ Science Festival, etc.), we demo'd the "Shredz 64" game which kids love.

        Sleep time now.

        I hope by morning we're back to discussing on-topic things, such as why the Atari 1040ST was the first REAL microcomputer. ;)
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