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Re: [midatlanticretro] Kenneth Olsen RIP

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  • Dan Roganti
    ... Flourescent bulbs were developed in the 1850s First commercial production lamps in 1895 -- --http://www.vintagecomputer.net/ragooman/
    Message 1 of 16 , Feb 9, 2011
      On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> wrote:
      > Nice flourescent bulb they had in their dad's basement workshop there...
      > back in the 30s, I guess? Did this come from the DEC PR department?
      >
      >

      Flourescent bulbs were developed in the 1850s
      First commercial production lamps in 1895


      --
      --http://www.vintagecomputer.net/ragooman/
    • system@great-escape.tmesis.com
      ... Slight the man all you want. First off, DEC was acquired by Compaq and what was left of that is in HP s (Hopelessly Pathetic) fumbling fingers. HP has not
      Message 2 of 16 , Feb 9, 2011
        Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> writes:

        >On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, system@... wrote:
        >
        >> A nice video on the genius of Ken Olsen: > >
        >http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Hdg7ArQbE
        >
        >Nice flourescent bulb they had in their dad's basement workshop there...
        >back in the 30s, I guess? Did this come from the DEC PR department?

        Slight the man all you want. First off, DEC was acquired by Compaq and
        what was left of that is in HP's (Hopelessly Pathetic) fumbling fingers.
        HP has not even acknowledged KO death.

        The videos were most likely produced by Gordon College in Mass. KO was
        a member of the college's board of directors.

        WRT the lamp comment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent_lamp

        It's also a contrived video. I doubt there was "actual footage" of KO,
        his brother and his father from the 1930s. It's an anachronism. Watch
        Kubrick's Spartacus and count the anachronisms. ;)
      • Alexey Toptygin
        ... I ve got nothing against Ken Olsen, I m sure he was a great guy, but this video is... disappointing. ... I see. ... I was fully aware that it was
        Message 3 of 16 , Feb 9, 2011
          On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, system@... wrote:

          > Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> writes:
          >
          >> On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, system@... wrote:
          >>
          >>> A nice video on the genius of Ken Olsen: > >
          >> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05Hdg7ArQbE
          >>
          >> Nice flourescent bulb they had in their dad's basement workshop there...
          >> back in the 30s, I guess? Did this come from the DEC PR department?
          >
          > Slight the man all you want. First off, DEC was acquired by Compaq and
          > what was left of that is in HP's (Hopelessly Pathetic) fumbling fingers.
          > HP has not even acknowledged KO death.

          I've got nothing against Ken Olsen, I'm sure he was a great guy, but this
          video is... disappointing.

          > The videos were most likely produced by Gordon College in Mass. KO was
          > a member of the college's board of directors.

          I see.

          > WRT the lamp comment: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescent_lamp
          >
          > It's also a contrived video. I doubt there was "actual footage" of KO,
          > his brother and his father from the 1930s. It's an anachronism. Watch
          > Kubrick's Spartacus and count the anachronisms. ;)

          I was fully aware that it was contrived. I wasn't trying to say that the
          lamps didn't exist in the 30s, but that it's rather unlikely that they
          were in commercial production, in a desk lamp format. According to the
          Wikipedia article you link to, sales of mass-production lamps started in
          1938, and they started taking market share from incandescents during WWII,
          which is after the time period supposedly depicted in the video.

          The producers of Spartacus weren't trying to be historically accurate, and
          it seems to me that the producers of this video weren't interested in
          historical accuracy either... that's all I was trying to say.

          Alexey
        • Alexey Toptygin
          ... [citation needed] Alexey
          Message 4 of 16 , Feb 9, 2011
            On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, Dan Roganti wrote:

            > On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> wrote:
            >> Nice flourescent bulb they had in their dad's basement workshop there...
            >> back in the 30s, I guess? Did this come from the DEC PR department?
            >>
            >>
            >
            > Flourescent bulbs were developed in the 1850s
            > First commercial production lamps in 1895

            [citation needed]

            Alexey
          • Dan Roganti
            ... Perhaps the 20th century vernacular should be revised for some, Think befcore you speak should be preceded by Google before you Think There are patents
            Message 5 of 16 , Feb 9, 2011
              On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> wrote:
              > On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, Dan Roganti wrote:
              >
              >> On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> wrote:
              >>> Nice flourescent bulb they had in their dad's basement workshop there...
              >>> back in the 30s, I guess? Did this come from the DEC PR department?
              >>>
              >>>
              >>
              >> Flourescent bulbs were developed in the 1850s
              >> First commercial production lamps in 1895
              >
              > [citation needed]
              >

              Perhaps the 20th century vernacular should be revised for some,
              'Think befcore you speak' should be preceded by 'Google before you Think'
              There are patents dating back to 1911 for the balanced arm desk lamp
              such as those in the video. And some were being made already by 1932.



              --
              --http://www.vintagecomputer.net/ragooman/
            • Alexey Toptygin
              ... So, first you said that they were commercially produced in 1895. Now you are saying there are patents from 1911 (the existence of which doesn t say
              Message 6 of 16 , Feb 9, 2011
                On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, Dan Roganti wrote:

                > On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> wrote:
                >> On Wed, 9 Feb 2011, Dan Roganti wrote:
                >>
                >>> On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...> wrote:
                >>>> Nice flourescent bulb they had in their dad's basement workshop there...
                >>>> back in the 30s, I guess? Did this come from the DEC PR department?
                >>>>
                >>>>
                >>>
                >>> Flourescent bulbs were developed in the 1850s
                >>> First commercial production lamps in 1895
                >>
                >> [citation needed]
                >>
                >
                > Perhaps the 20th century vernacular should be revised for some,
                > 'Think befcore you speak' should be preceded by 'Google before you Think'
                > There are patents dating back to 1911 for the balanced arm desk lamp
                > such as those in the video. And some were being made already by 1932.

                So, first you said that they were commercially produced in 1895. Now you
                are saying there are patents from 1911 (the existence of which doesn't say
                anything about whether the lamps were being made or not), and "some were
                being made already by 1932", again with no attribution. Does this mean you
                retract your claim that they were being commercially produced in 1895?

                I feel that your "'Think befcore you speak' should be preceded by 'Google
                before you Think'" is an ad-hominem attack against me. If you think
                there's loads of evidence that those lamps were in commercial production
                before the end of the 30s (as your comment seems to indicate), then please
                present it and I will admit that I was wrong.

                Alexey
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