Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Playing with my Catweasel

Expand Messages
  • Mike Loewen
    I finally had a chance to do some experimenting with my Catweasel MK4+, and I m duly impressed. I have it installed in a Abit KT7A-RAID motherboard with an
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 11, 2011
      I finally had a chance to do some experimenting with my Catweasel MK4+,
      and I'm duly impressed. I have it installed in a Abit KT7A-RAID
      motherboard with an AMD Athlon 1100 CPU and 768MB of RAM. I picked up
      this motherboard on Ebay for $10.50, because its floppy controller
      reliably supports single-density with Dave Dunfield's IMD utility. I have
      two 5-1/4" drives installed (1.2MB and 360KB), and can connect an external
      double-sided 8" drive by swapping a cable.

      Under Windows XP Pro, the Catweasel was able to read Commodore 64 disks
      via the IMAGETOOL3 utility and save them to D64 image files. I was then
      able to boot those D64 images in VICE (a Commodore emulator) under Linux.
      Impressive. IMAGETOOL3 also recognizes a boatload of other common disk
      formats, but needs more, especially 8" formats.

      The beta drivers and tools for the MK4 come with a Windows port of Tim
      Mann's CW2DMK utility. CW2DMK is a command line utility to read disks
      formatted with WD-compatible controllers and save them in David Keil's DMK
      format, common in the TRS-80 world. I used it to archive a box of
      NewDOS80 disks from my old Model III. The Catweasel is a lot faster than
      using IMD.

      I also was able to read some DEC 8" RX02 disks. Plus, I was able to
      read an 8" disk I've been carrying around since 1986, written on a Delta
      Data terminal in an odd format. I'll have to write a conversion program
      to actually extract the data, but I can see utility programs and some old
      C code I wrote in the DMK image.

      The Catweasel can also read Apple II GCR disks and Atari disks, and
      save them in a virtual disk format. I didn't try any Apple II disks, but
      it was able to read a couple of Atari disks.

      In order to make this machine maximally useful, I need to add a 3-1/2"
      drive, and manufacture a a PCB with a 4-position switch and 4 headers. I
      have a 37-contact switch from a data switchbox, and plan to use that to
      switch between my drives so I can button up the case and not have to
      switch cables. I'll also install Linux and FreeDOS.


      Mike Loewen mloewen@...
      Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
    • Bill Degnan
      Mike, If you d like to bring that to the Workshop next month? I would be happy to provide whatever drives parts you need. Bill Degnan ... have ... external
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 11, 2011
        Mike,

        If you'd like to bring that to the Workshop next month? I would be happy
        to provide whatever drives parts you need.

        Bill Degnan

        -------- Original Message --------
        > From: "Mike Loewen" <mloewen@...>
        > Sent: Tuesday, January 11, 2011 10:45 AM
        > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Playing with my Catweasel
        >
        > I finally had a chance to do some experimenting with my Catweasel MK4+,
        > and I'm duly impressed. I have it installed in a Abit KT7A-RAID
        > motherboard with an AMD Athlon 1100 CPU and 768MB of RAM. I picked up
        > this motherboard on Ebay for $10.50, because its floppy controller
        > reliably supports single-density with Dave Dunfield's IMD utility. I
        have
        > two 5-1/4" drives installed (1.2MB and 360KB), and can connect an
        external
        > double-sided 8" drive by swapping a cable.
        >
        > Under Windows XP Pro, the Catweasel was able to read Commodore 64
        disks
        > via the IMAGETOOL3 utility and save them to D64 image files. I was then

        > able to boot those D64 images in VICE (a Commodore emulator) under Linux.

        > Impressive. IMAGETOOL3 also recognizes a boatload of other common disk
        > formats, but needs more, especially 8" formats.
        >
        > The beta drivers and tools for the MK4 come with a Windows port of
        Tim
        > Mann's CW2DMK utility. CW2DMK is a command line utility to read disks
        > formatted with WD-compatible controllers and save them in David Keil's
        DMK
        > format, common in the TRS-80 world. I used it to archive a box of
        > NewDOS80 disks from my old Model III. The Catweasel is a lot faster than

        > using IMD.
        >
        > I also was able to read some DEC 8" RX02 disks. Plus, I was able to

        > read an 8" disk I've been carrying around since 1986, written on a Delta

        > Data terminal in an odd format. I'll have to write a conversion program

        > to actually extract the data, but I can see utility programs and some old

        > C code I wrote in the DMK image.
        >
        > The Catweasel can also read Apple II GCR disks and Atari disks, and
        > save them in a virtual disk format. I didn't try any Apple II disks, but

        > it was able to read a couple of Atari disks.
        >
        > In order to make this machine maximally useful, I need to add a
        3-1/2"
        > drive, and manufacture a a PCB with a 4-position switch and 4 headers. I

        > have a 37-contact switch from a data switchbox, and plan to use that to
        > switch between my drives so I can button up the case and not have to
        > switch cables. I'll also install Linux and FreeDOS.
        >
        >
        > Mike Loewen mloewen@...
        > Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.