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Museum long-term expectations (please read, important!)

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  • Evan
    Hi all, I d like to address a topic which keeps coming up: what does Fred and InfoAge expect from the MARCH museum? I ve had several conversations with Fred
    Message 1 of 31 , Nov 10, 2005
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      Hi all,

      I'd like to address a topic which keeps coming up: what does Fred and
      InfoAge expect from the MARCH museum?

      I've had several conversations with Fred about this topic during the past
      year. He and I are completely on the same page about what should be
      accomplished and how it should be accomplished. To be
      super-duper-double-'puter sure, I called Fred again just now, and he
      committed a thorough vote of confidence.

      The ultimate goal: to have a simple, inexpensive, effective place where
      people can learn about vintage computers.

      Every single person affiliated with InfoAge -- from Fred himself to the most
      remote, uninvolved MARCH list lurkers -- has one thing in common: none of us
      get any payment. Everything done at InfoAge in the past 12 years (that's
      how long they've been working on it!) has been a volunteer action in
      someone's spare time.

      Fred and I have absolutely zero expectatons of a "museum" in the sense of
      "the kind of museum you find in a big city". Brand-new plexiglass display
      cases? Rubbish! Gorgeous carpet and signs? Let's use second-hand ones
      instead! Velvet ropes? Screw that, we want people to touch stuff! (*granted,
      not the expensive computers without our close supervision.)

      The * nicest * rooms in the main InfoAge building have mediocre white paint,
      a few cracked walls, and uneven tiles. Don't like it? Tough cookies. :)

      Yes, our cataloging process should be taken seriously, and no, we don't want
      to get sued over Stupid Legal Logo Issues (capitalized for entertainment
      value).

      Ah, "entertainment value" -- volunteering our time for a computer museum is
      about the most fun thing I can think of for extreme nerdity. When Andy and
      I decided to start a club back in January, "Keep the fun foremost!" was the
      first order by leaps and bounds.

      When we say "club museum" we should think "plain room with computers" and
      never "Smithsonian".

      (The main Computer History Museum, where I was last week, has a $75 million
      budget. We'd be happy with a $750 budget. Let's not kid ourselves over
      what's possible. Back in my college newspaper days, serving as editor
      during my senior year, I really drove people away by saying "We're not the
      New York Times but why shouldn't we try to be?" and I'm not going to make
      that mistake again. We're just a local low-budget club "museum" in the
      loosest sense of the word.)

      So I ** urge ** everyone not to worry so much about how long this takes us,
      how ugly it all looks, what systems work or don't yet work, and all that
      stuff. Fred and InfoAge want us to do whatever we can, whenever we can, and
      they'll be quite happy with however it turns out -- because even a little of
      our hard work is more than existed before. I'm all for having pride in our
      work (I do already for the things MARCH accomplished in just 10 months), but
      neither the club itself nor the museum nor VCF (well, maybe VCF) are things
      we should ever have any stress over...

      -----------------------------------------
      Evan Koblentz's personal homepage: http://www.snarc.net

      Computer Collector Newsletter:
      >> http://news.computercollector.com

      Mid-Atlantic Retro Computing Hobbyists & Museum:
      >> http://www.marchclub.org
      >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/midatlanticretro/
    • William Pechter
      Nah... in dos 1.0 they used the / for a command line options separator just like CP/M and RT11 (these were more models for the early DOS than Unix was). The
      Message 31 of 31 , Nov 11, 2005
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        Nah... in dos 1.0 they used the / for a command line options separator
        just like CP/M and RT11 (these were more models for the early DOS
        than Unix was).

        The \ for directory separator was because / was used.

        Sometimes I wonder why Microsoft does anything original.

        They're pretty much marketing based not engineering based.


        Bill

        --- Evan <evan947@...> wrote:

        > I've heard that story presented as fact a few times. Sounds
        > plausible
        > enough.
        >
        >
        >
        > * Trivia from when I worked at Bell Labs - you can decide on the
        > truth or fiction of it: Any idea *why* we use a backslash in MS-DOS?
        > DOS's filesystem was modeled after Unix, and back then AT&T zealously
        >
        > guarded it as a piece of intelectual property (despite the fact it
        > crashed a lot and noone really liked it, except the faithful). As
        > legend has it, since Unix used a slash, Microsoft decided to use a
        > backslash to differentiate itself. Same thing for commands - dir
        > instead of ls, edit instead of ed, and so forth.....
        >
        >
        >
        >
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