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Disaster restoration

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  • Kelly Leavitt
    I m looking for an opinion. First a word of caution, the following tale contains a graphic description of the destruction of a classic computer. If such things
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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      I'm looking for an opinion. First a word of caution, the following
      tale contains a graphic description of the destruction of a classic
      computer. If such things make you queasy, please turn away.

      I have several TRS-80 Model 12 computers with dual 8" disk drives.
      They reside on a heavy duty metal shelf that is fastened to the wall.
      The one on the top shelf is about 5.5' off the ground. The bracket
      that holds this shelf to the shelving upright decided it didn't like
      being where it was and fell to the floor. Unfortunately, this was the
      bracket on the front, and the shelf pitched forward. So did the 30
      pound model 12. Fortunately, it didn't land quite directly on the
      cement floor below, but struck a glancing blow.

      Now, one of my model 12's (and the only on whose case had not
      yellowed) is in about 5 brazillion pieces (actually only about 100 or
      so, but this is my story).

      What to do? I can use some glues and re-enforcers to reassemble the
      case. I can also re-align the floppy drives. But what happens to
      the "value" of the computer.

      Personally, as long as it functions, and is intact after repairs, it
      doesn't bother me. What do you all think?

      Any suggestions for the type of glue to use? The case in question is
      made of that brittle, hard plastic that RS was fond of in its
      business computers.
    • B. Degnan
      Youch!...I would wrap/bag the working pieces and wait for a non-functioning 12 to come along (ebay or ??), buy it, and then do a transplant. It would not hurt
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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        Youch!...I would wrap/bag the working pieces and wait for a non-functioning
        12 to come along (ebay or ??), buy it, and then do a transplant. It would
        not hurt to try to fix the case, but load-bearing plastic is hard to recover.
        Bill D

        At 01:27 PM 11/4/2005 +0000, you wrote:
        >I'm looking for an opinion. First a word of caution, the following
        >tale contains a graphic description of the destruction of a classic
        >computer. If such things make you queasy, please turn away.
        >
        >I have several TRS-80 Model 12 computers with dual 8" disk drives.
        >They reside on a heavy duty metal shelf that is fastened to the wall.
        >The one on the top shelf is about 5.5' off the ground. The bracket
        >that holds this shelf to the shelving upright decided it didn't like
        >being where it was and fell to the floor. Unfortunately, this was the
        >bracket on the front, and the shelf pitched forward. So did the 30
        >pound model 12. Fortunately, it didn't land quite directly on the
        >cement floor below, but struck a glancing blow.
        >
        >Now, one of my model 12's (and the only on whose case had not
        >yellowed) is in about 5 brazillion pieces (actually only about 100 or
        >so, but this is my story).
        >
        >What to do? I can use some glues and re-enforcers to reassemble the
        >case. I can also re-align the floppy drives. But what happens to
        >the "value" of the computer.
        >
        >Personally, as long as it functions, and is intact after repairs, it
        >doesn't bother me. What do you all think?
        >
        >Any suggestions for the type of glue to use? The case in question is
        >made of that brittle, hard plastic that RS was fond of in its
        >business computers.
        >
      • Kelly Leavitt
        ... Fortunately, it is not the load-bearing plastics that are the most damaged. The structural load for the model 12 basically rests in the bottom tray, and
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "B. Degnan" <billdeg@d...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Youch!...I would wrap/bag the working pieces and wait for a non-
          > functioning 12 to come along (ebay or ??), buy it, and then do a
          > transplant. It would not hurt to try to fix the case, but
          > load-bearing plastic is hard to recover.
          > Bill D
          >
          Fortunately, it is not the load-bearing plastics that are the most
          damaged. The structural load for the model 12 basically rests in the
          bottom tray, and the top shell is fastened to it. Most of the damage
          was to this shell.

          Kelly
        • Degnan
          ah, then I would get a nice cool beer or two and some super glue. No rush and do my best to repair. You have nothing to lose. Bill ... home page ... -- E N D
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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            ah, then I would get a nice cool beer or two and some super glue.
            No rush and do my best to repair. You have nothing to lose.
            Bill

            At Friday, 04 November 2005, you wrote:

            >--- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "B. Degnan" <billdeg@d...>
            >wrote:
            >>
            >> Youch!...I would wrap/bag the working pieces and wait for a non-
            >> functioning 12 to come along (ebay or ??), buy it, and then do a
            >> transplant. It would not hurt to try to fix the case, but
            >> load-bearing plastic is hard to recover.
            >> Bill D
            >>
            >Fortunately, it is not the load-bearing plastics that are the most
            >damaged. The structural load for the model 12 basically rests in the
            >bottom tray, and the top shell is fastened to it. Most of the damage
            >was to this shell.
            >
            >Kelly
            >
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            -- E N D --
          • John Allain
            When a case is as smashed as this one parts machine comes to mind, that is, there are people with good-looking systems that may no longer work and could use
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 4, 2005
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              When a case is as smashed as this one "parts machine" comes to mind,
              that is, there are people with good-looking systems that may no longer
              work and could use the components.
              Another idea: "The visible PC"... just mount everything in a plexiglass
              box.

              Take care with your systems and shelves, Live and Learn.
              John A.
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