Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

2" drives

Expand Messages
  • Ray Sills
    Once upon a time, I had a a music sampler that used a 2 drive (Akai S-612)). However, the disks used were quick disks .. It was an experiment to make an
    Message 1 of 15 , Mar 5, 2010
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Once upon a time, I had a a music sampler that used a 2" drive (Akai
      S-612)). However, the disks used were "quick disks"..
      It was an experiment to make an easy-to-use fast loading storage
      system. The disks were designed so that you could flip them over and
      use either side to save data. The limitation was that the disks would
      only hold 64K. That was OK for the intended use, and I think the hope
      was that the format would be useful for the "home" computers of the
      day. But, the format never caught on.

      I think the design of the disk was that it did not use a director or
      FAT.. but rather, started the recording track at the hub, and spiraled
      outward. The user would dump the entire 64K content at one time..
      either saving or loading. The data tracks were large enough that the
      mechanical aspects of the drive could easily track the spiral. It was
      meant to be simple and inexpensive.

      And, it was fairly quick.. the 64K dump would only take about 10
      seconds or so to transfer. Way faster than a cassette interface,
      which is what a lot of gear of the time was using. The Ensoniq Mirage
      sampler was a big step forward for the time, using single sided 3.5"
      floppy disks, and due to the increased capacity, coupled with the DOS-
      like ability to select individual files (samples), became a hit in the
      marketplace.

      73 de Ray
    • Dan Roganti
      just making some remarks about the distinction... Evan Koblentz wrote: Just because something is a mutant doesn t make it historic. The smaller drive form
      Message 2 of 15 , Mar 5, 2010
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment

        just making some remarks about the distinction...

        Evan Koblentz wrote:
        Just because something is a mutant doesn't make it historic.  

        The smaller drive form factor which demonstrated a better storage density is an innovation not a mutant. Their LCD laptop may be an example of another mutant of that period but you can't dismiss the innovation.

        If some kid is born with 19 arms, that doesn't make him an important part of 
        human evolutionary history.
        
        In a many centuries from now, Bill Degnan the 19th will post to a list 
        and write, "But that kid was the only one with 19 arms!  I don't know of 
        any others.  I best blog about it...."   :)
        
        ---------------------------------------------
          
        It's more historic because it's one of the few laptops with a 2" disk drive.  The size is not anything special at all, it's the same as most LCD laptops of the era.  I don't know of any other laptops that had a 2" disk drive, does anyone?
            


        =Dan
        http://www.vintagecomputer.net/ragooman/
        

      • David
        I m glad this came back up, as I have been meaning to respond to this. I have one of these, and I HAD one back in 1992, which I purchased on clearance from a
        Message 3 of 15 , Mar 6, 2010
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          I'm glad this came back up, as I have been meaning to respond to this. I have one of these, and I HAD one back in 1992, which I purchased on clearance from a company through "Computer Shopper." I believe I paid about $299 for it. It's not significant in the history of personal computers, nor specifically the laptop, but I still find it very interesting. I had long given mine away, so I then starting looking for one a few years ago, and got one off of eBay.

          So, I guess the better word for it is - collectible. It's very collectible, because it's unique enough and interesting. Not only does it have the unique 2" disk drive, but it could also have one or two meg of RAM, which you could allocate part of as a RAM drive. It also booted DOS 3.3 from ROM, plus, it has a very cool version of LapLink (I'm pretty sure that's the brand) in ROM, where you can just connect it to another computer, and transfer across to it, so you can then begin transferring files. I was in college part-time, and I was taking a course in both Lotus 1-2-3 and dBase III+. I purchased the computer to do my work at home, instead of at the lab (I had a Mac at home). I was able to copy the programs off of one of the lab computers to my minisPORT, shhhhhh. I only used the software for those courses.

          This is a unique and proud part of my collection, along side at least two other, non-significant, but very cool computers -
          the Canon Navigator
          http://www.museo8bits.com/navigator.htm

          and the Convergent Technologies WorkSlate
          http://www.vintagecomputer.net/convergent/

          I also used to see those advertised for about $1200 or so in the same timespan in "Computer Shopper."


          Best,

          David Greelish

          www.ClassicComputing.com
          The Home of Computer History Nostalgia

          The Classic Computing Show podcast

          Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer
          audio book podcast

          The Classic Computing Expo
          (planning / working towards summer 2010)
        • Jim Scheef
          The 2 drive was an attempt at a more portable computing environment when floppies were still an important storage medium. Unfortunately Zenith did nothing
          Message 4 of 15 , Mar 7, 2010
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            The 2" drive was an attempt at a more "portable" computing environment when floppies were still an important storage medium. Unfortunately Zenith did nothing to help owners get their data off the 2" floppy and onto their primary computer - their desktop. The reverse was also true so installing applications on the 2" floppy was also a problem. Like so many early laptops, this machine was an misconceived, poorly marketed and poorly supported experiment. Does that make it historic? Like Evan said - sorta. Is it collectible? Certainly, if this is what interests you, then add it to your collection! Of course it would be nice if it comes with a few of those hard to find 2" disks.

            Jim

            On 3/5/2010 9:34 PM, Dan Roganti wrote:
             


            just making some remarks about the distinction. ..

            Evan Koblentz wrote:

            Just because something is a mutant doesn't make it historic.  

            The smaller drive form factor which demonstrated a better storage density is an innovation not a mutant. Their LCD laptop may be an example of another mutant of that period but you can't dismiss the innovation.
          • Jim Scheef
            David, Hooray for anyone who collects what s/he finds interesting irrespective of 10 year rules or any other arbitrary criteria. Collectible is not equal to
            Message 5 of 15 , Mar 7, 2010
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment
              David,

              Hooray for anyone who collects what s/he finds interesting irrespective of 10 year rules or any other arbitrary criteria. Collectible is not equal to historic and historic does not define collectible.

              I had not read your message when I responded to Dan and Evan and did not know about the embedded Laplink. HP did the same thing a few years later in the Omnibook 300/425/435 series and Laplink may have been embedded in more machines. The concept still existed as recently as WinXP (not sure about Vista or 7). Perhaps the MiniSport was the first? Maybe it is historic just a little bit more than sorta.

              Jim

              On 3/6/2010 10:47 AM, David wrote:
               



              I'm glad this came back up, as I have been meaning to respond to this. I have one of these, and I HAD one back in 1992, which I purchased on clearance from a company through "Computer Shopper." I believe I paid about $299 for it. It's not significant in the history of personal computers, nor specifically the laptop, but I still find it very interesting. I had long given mine away, so I then starting looking for one a few years ago, and got one off of eBay.

              So, I guess the better word for it is - collectible. It's very collectible, because it's unique enough and interesting. Not only does it have the unique 2" disk drive, but it could also have one or two meg of RAM, which you could allocate part of as a RAM drive. It also booted DOS 3.3 from ROM, plus, it has a very cool version of LapLink (I'm pretty sure that's the brand) in ROM, where you can just connect it to another computer, and transfer across to it, so you can then begin transferring files. I was in college part-time, and I was taking a course in both Lotus 1-2-3 and dBase III+. I purchased the computer to do my work at home, instead of at the lab (I had a Mac at home). I was able to copy the programs off of one of the lab computers to my minisPORT, shhhhhh. I only used the software for those courses.

              This is a unique and proud part of my collection, along side at least two other, non-significant, but very cool computers -
              the Canon Navigator
              http://www.museo8bi ts.com/navigator .htm

              and the Convergent Technologies WorkSlate
              http://www.vintagec omputer.net/ convergent/

              I also used to see those advertised for about $1200 or so in the same timespan in "Computer Shopper."

              Best,

              David Greelish

              www.ClassicComputin g.com
              The Home of Computer History Nostalgia

              The Classic Computing Show podcast

              Stan Veit's History of the Personal Computer
              audio book podcast

              The Classic Computing Expo
              (planning / working towards summer 2010)

            • Bob Schwier
              I ve been wondering if these two inch drives have any thing in common with the small floppies that Brother used even into the nineties in word processors and
              Message 6 of 15 , Mar 9, 2010
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment
                I've been wondering if these two inch drives have any thing in common with the small
                floppies that Brother used even into the nineties in word processors and sewing machines.
                bs

                --- On Fri, 3/5/10, Bill Degnan <billdeg@...> wrote:

                From: Bill Degnan <billdeg@...>
                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] historical? - Zenith minisPORT laptop
                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, March 5, 2010, 1:17 PM

                 


                -------- Original Message --------
                > From: "Bryan Pope" <bryan.pope@comcast. net>
                > Sent: Friday, March 05, 2010 1:08 PM
                > To: midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com
                > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] historical? - Zenith minisPORT laptop
                >
                > On 3/5/2010 12:43 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:
                > > Just because something is a mutant doesn't make it historic. If some
                > > kid is born with 19 arms, that doesn't make him an important part of
                > > human evolutionary history.
                > >
                > > In a many centuries from now, Bill Degnan the 19th will post to a list
                > > and write, "But that kid was the only one with 19 arms! I don't know
                of
                > > any others. I best blog about it...." :)
                > >
                > But in the VHS vs Beta war, wasn't Beta important? This laptop was
                > trying to go up against the 3 1/2" disk. Beta lost even though it has
                > better quality video. This lost even though it could hold more data.
                >

                But that was not my point.

                I was saying, IF this system were historic, it's not because it's a mini
                laptop as Jim Sheef said. It's no smaller than others of it's day. The
                only thing that could possibly make this a minor footnote in history is the
                fact that it had the 2" drives.

                My original question, which I believe has been answered, is - Is that
                enough to be "historic" / "vintage". It's from 1989/90 so it's on the
                fence years-wise in our context.

                Side note - the 2" drive had more capacity than the 3.5 disk, despite what
                they say in Wikipedia. I tested the drive myself, it's 812K.

                Bill


              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.