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MARCH's latest acquisition

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  • Evan Koblentz
    Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219. I am ** VERY ** excited about this for several reasons. First, come on, it s a friggin Univac
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 14, 2010
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      Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219. I am **
      VERY ** excited about this for several reasons. First, come on, it's a
      friggin' Univac -- a company with a very rich local history, traced
      directly back to ENIAC. Second, this model is from the early 1960s,
      making the oldest of our minicomputers (the PDP-8 is from 1965; ours is
      a serial number from the middle 2/3 of the production line so it's
      probably from '66/'67.) Third, the 1219 happens to be the military
      version of the 418, and the military version was often used for radar
      control -- which obviously fits in with the Camp Evans / InfoAge goals.

      Here's a web site about it:
      http://mccworkshop.com/computers/comphistory1.htm .... the site also
      links to a "user guide" but in fact it's a brochure. Strange twist,
      whoever runs that site credits Bill Degnan!

      Speaking of which, Bill agreed to be in charge of this rescue. It's
      coming from a major university laboratory. I don't want to say exactly
      which one until AFTER we possess it. :)

      Anyway, big thanks to Jeff J. for connecting us with this, and to BD for
      agreeing to haul it.

      Meanwhile, this computer is too cool not to exhibit, and from what I'm
      told it is in decent condition. However our minicomputer exhibit space
      is already full. What we'll do is take down the Camp Evans poster
      exhibit, put those posters on a wall instead, and use the extra space to
      spread out the minicomputers exhibit.

      We're also getting a few unspecified teletypes in this deal.

      If I may add ... our club collection started out decently enough five
      years ago ... but it's quickly becoming quite impressive!!! Some of the
      most hardcore collectors on cctalk have personally told me what a great
      job we're doing here in MARCH. You should all be proud.
    • Evan Koblentz
      ... Picture: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/BRL64-UNIVAC_1218.jpg
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 14, 2010
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        > Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219.

        Picture:
        http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/BRL64-UNIVAC_1218.jpg
      • Evan Koblentz
        ... More info: http://bitsavers.org/pdf/univac/military/1219/
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 14, 2010
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          >> Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219.
          >>
          > Picture:
          > http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/dc/BRL64-UNIVAC_1218.jpg
          >

          More info: http://bitsavers.org/pdf/univac/military/1219/
        • Christian Liendo
          NICE!!! Funny I read this and I thought of the SNL J**z in my pants video. #1 we need to have many pictures of the move #2 it will make VCFE even MORE
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 15, 2010
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            NICE!!!

            Funny I read this and I thought of the SNL J**z in my pants video.

            #1 we need to have many pictures of the move
            #2 it will make VCFE even MORE important.




            --- On Thu, 1/14/10, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

            From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
            Subject: [midatlanticretro] MARCH's latest acquisition
            To: "Yahoo MARCH Yahoo" <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Thursday, January 14, 2010, 11:27 PM

             

            Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219. I am **
            VERY ** excited about this for several reasons. First, come on, it's a
            friggin' Univac -- a company with a very rich local history, traced
            directly back to ENIAC. Second, this model is from the early 1960s,
            making the oldest of our minicomputers (the PDP-8 is from 1965; ours is
            a serial number from the middle 2/3 of the production line so it's
            probably from '66/'67.) Third, the 1219 happens to be the military
            version of the 418, and the military version was often used for radar
            control -- which obviously fits in with the Camp Evans / InfoAge goals.

            Here's a web site about it:
            http://mccworkshop. com/computers/ comphistory1. htm .... the site also
            links to a "user guide" but in fact it's a brochure. Strange twist,
            whoever runs that site credits Bill Degnan!

            Speaking of which, Bill agreed to be in charge of this rescue. It's
            coming from a major university laboratory. I don't want to say exactly
            which one until AFTER we possess it. :)

            Anyway, big thanks to Jeff J. for connecting us with this, and to BD for
            agreeing to haul it.

            Meanwhile, this computer is too cool not to exhibit, and from what I'm
            told it is in decent condition. However our minicomputer exhibit space
            is already full. What we'll do is take down the Camp Evans poster
            exhibit, put those posters on a wall instead, and use the extra space to
            spread out the minicomputers exhibit.

            We're also getting a few unspecified teletypes in this deal.

            If I may add ... our club collection started out decently enough five
            years ago ... but it's quickly becoming quite impressive!! ! Some of the
            most hardcore collectors on cctalk have personally told me what a great
            job we're doing here in MARCH. You should all be proud.


          • Evan Koblentz
            ... They said we re not allowed to bring cameras into this facility. But they have their own camera and promised to take pictures for us.
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 15, 2010
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              #1 we need to have many pictures of the move

              They said we're not allowed to bring cameras into this facility.  But they have their own camera and promised to take pictures for us.
            • Bill Dromgoole
              There were two major versions of the Univac 1219 computer used by the U.S. Navy as part of shipboard missile fire control systems. One had eight I/O channels
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 15, 2010
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                There were two major versions of the Univac 1219 computer used by the U.S. Navy
                as part of shipboard missile fire control systems.
                One had eight I/O channels the other had sixteen I/O channels.The sixteen
                channel version is three racks wide.
                In the fire control world the computer was known as the Mark 152 computer.
                On the Mark 76 MFCS as used on DLG type guided missile frigates the I/O console
                was a Univac 1532, this console had a paper tape punch, papertape reader and
                Teletype model 35(I think)
                keyboard printer.On the DDG ships it was a different I/O console that used
                cassette tapes and a Klienschmidt keyboard printer unit.
                The computer runs off of 400 Hz power and had its own small motor generater to
                provide power.

                The ships I worked on used the computer in support of the AN/SPG-55B Radar.
                A lot of the developement work on this radar was done at a major Maryland
                University.
                My guess is that that is the source of the 1219.
                One thing I remember about these computers is that they a heavy!!!,
                Even when disassembled.


                billdrom

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Evan Koblentz" <evan@...>
                To: "Yahoo MARCH Yahoo" <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, January 14, 2010 11:27 PM
                Subject: [midatlanticretro] MARCH's latest acquisition


                Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219. I am **
                VERY ** excited about this for several reasons. First, come on, it's a
                friggin' Univac -- a company with a very rich local history, traced
                directly back to ENIAC. Second, this model is from the early 1960s,
                making the oldest of our minicomputers (the PDP-8 is from 1965; ours is
                a serial number from the middle 2/3 of the production line so it's
                probably from '66/'67.) Third, the 1219 happens to be the military
                version of the 418, and the military version was often used for radar
                control -- which obviously fits in with the Camp Evans / InfoAge goals.

                Here's a web site about it:
                http://mccworkshop.com/computers/comphistory1.htm .... the site also
                links to a "user guide" but in fact it's a brochure. Strange twist,
                whoever runs that site credits Bill Degnan!

                Speaking of which, Bill agreed to be in charge of this rescue. It's
                coming from a major university laboratory. I don't want to say exactly
                which one until AFTER we possess it. :)

                Anyway, big thanks to Jeff J. for connecting us with this, and to BD for
                agreeing to haul it.

                Meanwhile, this computer is too cool not to exhibit, and from what I'm
                told it is in decent condition. However our minicomputer exhibit space
                is already full. What we'll do is take down the Camp Evans poster
                exhibit, put those posters on a wall instead, and use the extra space to
                spread out the minicomputers exhibit.

                We're also getting a few unspecified teletypes in this deal.

                If I may add ... our club collection started out decently enough five
                years ago ... but it's quickly becoming quite impressive!!! Some of the
                most hardcore collectors on cctalk have personally told me what a great
                job we're doing here in MARCH. You should all be proud.
              • Brian Schenkenberger, VAXman-
                ... Sperry Univac systems (not a 1219) powered the US Navy s VAST test stations on the aircraft carriers too. There were several of these systems at Navy
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 15, 2010
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                  "Bill Dromgoole" <drummy@...> writes:

                  >There were two major versions of the Univac 1219 computer used by the
                  >U.S. Navy as part of shipboard missile fire control systems. One had
                  >eight I/O channels the other had sixteen I/O channels.The sixteen
                  >channel version is three racks wide. In the fire control world the
                  >computer was known as the Mark 152 computer. On the Mark 76 MFCS as used
                  >on DLG type guided missile frigates the I/O console was a Univac 1532,
                  >this console had a paper tape punch, papertape reader and Teletype model
                  >35(I think) keyboard printer.On the DDG ships it was a different I/O
                  >console that used cassette tapes and a Klienschmidt keyboard printer
                  >unit. The computer runs off of 400 Hz power and had its own small motor
                  >generater to provide power.
                  >
                  >The ships I worked on used the computer in support of the AN/SPG-55B
                  >Radar. A lot of the developement work on this radar was done at a major
                  >Maryland University. My guess is that that is the source of the 1219.
                  >One thing I remember about these computers is that they a heavy!!!, Even
                  >when disassembled.

                  Sperry Univac systems (not a 1219) powered the US Navy's VAST test stations
                  on the aircraft carriers too. There were several of these systems at Navy
                  sites -- one at Lakehurst when I worked there -- that were cannibalized to
                  keep the systems on the ships alive. I assisted with a project to write an
                  emulator for the Univacs that ran under VAX/VMS. Very interesting systems
                  for their time. It seems the US Navy employed Univacs for various computer
                  control efforts.

                  --
                  VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

                  "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
                • Evan Koblentz
                  ... The benefactor sent me a donation contract which I signed and returned tonight. I suppose it s safe to identify em now: this equipment is coming from
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 19, 2010
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                    > Thanks to a Jeff Jonas, we MARCHins are getting a Univac 1219. I am **
                    > VERY ** excited about this

                    The benefactor sent me a donation contract which I signed and returned
                    tonight. I suppose it's safe to identify 'em now: this equipment is
                    coming from Johns Hopkins U.'s Applied Physics Laboratory. That means
                    we can learn about how these particular units were used (if it's not
                    secret.) A friend of Jeff J. works there and set this up for us.

                    So ....... Bill Deg. is bringing the computers + stuff from its present
                    location to Wilmington, De. on Saturday morning, then I'm bringing it
                    the rest of the way to InfoAge ..... where Steve will use InfoAge's
                    forklift to carry it the final mile. The full computer will go directly
                    on exhibit as-is, perhaps with one of the teletypes (they're giving us
                    four -- unknown model). We'll cordon a small area in the exhibit room
                    for cleaning, etc. .... rest goes into storage, blah blah blah.
                  • Evan Koblentz
                    Today I received a Data General One laptop from someone in Massachusetts. He originally contacted the M.I.T. Museum, which didn t want it, so the curator
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 15, 2010
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                      Today I received a Data General One laptop from someone in
                      Massachusetts. He originally contacted the M.I.T. Museum, which didn't
                      want it, so the curator referred him to us.

                      This is the second time the institute helped us. Last time, they sent a
                      DEC Robin our way.
                    • Brian Schenkenberger, VAXman-
                      ... Waxing nostalgic here. I have to see your VT180 when I next visit. I may even have some old disks for it here somewhere in my d|i|g|i|t|a|l domain. --
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 16, 2010
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                        Evan Koblentz <evan@...> writes:

                        >Today I received a Data General One laptop from someone in
                        >Massachusetts. He originally contacted the M.I.T. Museum, which didn't
                        >want it, so the curator referred him to us.
                        >
                        >This is the second time the institute helped us. Last time, they sent a
                        >DEC Robin our way.

                        Waxing nostalgic here. I have to see your VT180 when I next visit. I
                        may even have some old disks for it here somewhere in my d|i|g|i|t|a|l
                        domain.

                        --
                        VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

                        "And though it seems they smile with glee, I know in truth they envy me
                        and watch as my befuddled brain, shines on brightly quite insane"
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