Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

At what point did viruses become a problem?

Expand Messages
  • billdeg@aol.com
    At what point does everyone check software to be installed onto one of your classic/vintage computer systems. How prevalent are viruses on the Apple II GS? I
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 19, 2005
      At what point does everyone check software to be installed onto one of your
      classic/vintage computer systems.

      How prevalent are viruses on the Apple II GS? I am curious about how far
      back (what models) do you start worrying about viruses on an Apple/MAC?

      On the IBM's personally I don't check PC/XT/AT's for viruses, but software
      installed onto anything newer gets scanned before installation onto a vintage
      computer.

      I am curious as to your opinions. Has anyone ever encountered a Commodore
      virus? Atari? Tandy?
    • relayer
      In my experience, not anything before the Amiga as far as Commodore computers are concerned. The Amiga used to pick up a lot of boot sector viruses. A virus on
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 20, 2005
        In my experience, not anything before the Amiga as far as Commodore
        computers are concerned. The Amiga used to pick up a lot of boot
        sector viruses. A virus on a floppy would launch from the boot sector
        and become a memory resident program. Each writable floppy after that
        while the virus was active would write itself to the next disk's boot
        sector after it's inserted. There were resident virus checkers that
        would catch them.

        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, billdeg@a... wrote:
        > I am curious as to your opinions. Has anyone ever encountered a
        Commodore
        > virus? Atari? Tandy?
      • Bryan Pope
        ... There could also have been viruses on the C128 with 1571 since it also had a boot sector... Cheers, Bryan
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 20, 2005
          relayer wrote:
          > In my experience, not anything before the Amiga as far as Commodore
          > computers are concerned. The Amiga used to pick up a lot of boot
          > sector viruses. A virus on a floppy would launch from the boot sector
          > and become a memory resident program. Each writable floppy after that
          > while the virus was active would write itself to the next disk's boot
          > sector after it's inserted. There were resident virus checkers that
          > would catch them.
          >

          There could also have been viruses on the C128 with 1571 since it also
          had a boot sector...

          Cheers,

          Bryan
        • Evan
          I don t know the answer, but check this out -- Bruce Damer (DigiBarn) recently interviewed the guy who invented A/V software.
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 20, 2005
            I don't know the answer, but check this out -- Bruce Damer (DigiBarn) recently interviewed the guy who invented A/V software.
             


            From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of billdeg@...
            Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2005 12:58 AM
            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [midatlanticretro] At what point did viruses become a problem?

            At what point does everyone check software to be installed onto one of your
            classic/vintage computer systems.

            How prevalent are viruses on the Apple II GS?  I am curious about how far
            back (what models) do you start worrying about viruses on an Apple/MAC? 

            On the IBM's personally I don't check PC/XT/AT's for viruses, but software
            installed onto anything newer gets scanned before installation onto a vintage
            computer.

            I am curious as to your opinions.  Has anyone ever encountered a Commodore
            virus?  Atari? Tandy?
          • Joe Giliberti
            ... Wasn t the first major virus from around 86 or 87? Joe
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 20, 2005
              Bryan Pope wrote:

              > relayer wrote:
              > > In my experience, not anything before the Amiga as far as Commodore
              > > computers are concerned. The Amiga used to pick up a lot of boot
              > > sector viruses. A virus on a floppy would launch from the boot sector
              > > and become a memory resident program. Each writable floppy after that
              > > while the virus was active would write itself to the next disk's boot
              > > sector after it's inserted. There were resident virus checkers that
              > > would catch them.
              > >
              >
              > There could also have been viruses on the C128 with 1571 since it also
              > had a boot sector...
              >
              > Cheers,
              >
              > Bryan
              >
              Wasn't the first major virus from around '86 or '87?

              Joe
            • Evan
              Not that anyone should trust Wikipedia as an objection and thorough source, but, here s what they say: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_virus#History
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 20, 2005
                Not that anyone should trust Wikipedia as an objection and thorough source, but, here's what they say: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_virus#History


                From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of billdeg@...
                Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2005 12:58 AM
                To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: [midatlanticretro] At what point did viruses become a problem?

                At what point does everyone check software to be installed onto one of your
                classic/vintage computer systems.

                How prevalent are viruses on the Apple II GS?  I am curious about how far
                back (what models) do you start worrying about viruses on an Apple/MAC? 

                On the IBM's personally I don't check PC/XT/AT's for viruses, but software
                installed onto anything newer gets scanned before installation onto a vintage
                computer.

                I am curious as to your opinions.  Has anyone ever encountered a Commodore
                virus?  Atari? Tandy?
              • Jim Scheef
                Bill, To paraphrase the resident computer security expert in my computer club, safe hex is about knowing who you are sleeping with (should be with whom you
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 21, 2005
                  Bill,

                  To paraphrase the resident computer 'security expert' in my computer club,
                  safe hex is about knowing who you are sleeping with (should be with whom you
                  are sleeping, but never mind). Early viruses (viri?) were almost exclusively
                  spread by boot sector, so never boot from an untrusted floppy. In my (very)
                  limited experience, viri were a bigger problem on Macs than PCs in the early
                  days because the interns played games on our departmental Mac so any disk you
                  inserted was instantly infected.

                  This is a problem I had not considered before. While there may be viri 'out
                  there' that run on many vintage machines, where would you find a 'current'
                  version of anti-virus scanner software? And can the source of such software
                  be trusted?! How do you scan the scanner?

                  Jim

                  --- billdeg@... wrote:

                  > At what point does everyone check software to be installed onto one of your
                  >
                  > classic/vintage computer systems.
                  >
                  > How prevalent are viruses on the Apple II GS? I am curious about how far
                  > back (what models) do you start worrying about viruses on an Apple/MAC?
                  >
                  > On the IBM's personally I don't check PC/XT/AT's for viruses, but software
                  > installed onto anything newer gets scanned before installation onto a
                  > vintage
                  > computer.
                  >
                  > I am curious as to your opinions. Has anyone ever encountered a Commodore
                  > virus? Atari? Tandy?
                  >
                • relayer
                  That s what I think everytime I see someone installing Norton AV. It loads down the system more than a resource eating virus.
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 21, 2005
                    That's what I think everytime I see someone installing Norton AV. It
                    loads down the system more than a resource eating virus.

                    > be trusted?! How do you scan the scanner?
                  Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.