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Oh no! RESISTORS burns down

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  • Ben Combee
    http://www.trentonian.com/articles/2009/12/04/news/doc4b1888f3ca007384474191.txt HOPEWELL TWP. — Windswept flames 50 feet high yesterday destroyed the local
    Message 1 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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      http://www.trentonian.com/articles/2009/12/04/news/doc4b1888f3ca007384474191.txt

      HOPEWELL TWP. — Windswept flames 50 feet high yesterday destroyed the local barn where computer programming first flourished, beneath an imported stage that was first used at the New York Worlds Fair of 1964.

      The 50-by-100 foot building on the property of computer pioneer Claude A.R. Kagan, now 85, gained a reputation in the late ‘60s and ‘70s as a hangout for misfits from Hopewell Valley High and Princeton — kids whom Kagan said he pulled away from pot and turned on to computers.

      Early members of that first 1967 computer club in New Jersey, known as the RESISTORS, wrote programs in SAM76, Kagan’s own early computer language, “and even wrote a primer about the language,” said an ode to Kagan when he was honored as 2007 Hobbyist of the Year by the Amateur Computer Group of New Jersey.

      ...
    • Bill Degnan
      holy crap
      Message 2 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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        holy crap

        -------- Original Message --------
        > From: "Ben Combee" <ben.combee@...>
        > Sent: Friday, December 04, 2009 12:10 PM
        > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Oh no! RESISTORS burns down
        >
        > http://www.trentonian.com/articles/2009/12/04/news/doc4b1888f3ca007384474191.txt
        >
        > HOPEWELL TWP. - Windswept flames 50 feet high yesterday destroyed the local
        > barn where computer programming first flourished, beneath an imported stage
        > that was first used at the New York Worlds Fair of 1964.
        >
        > The 50-by-100 foot building on the property of computer pioneer Claude A.R.
        > Kagan, now 85, gained a reputation in the late '60s and '70s as a hangout
        > for misfits from Hopewell Valley High and Princeton - kids whom Kagan said
        > he pulled away from pot and turned on to computers.
        >
        > Early members of that first 1967 computer club in New Jersey, known as the
        > RESISTORS, wrote programs in SAM76, Kagan's own early computer language,
        > "and even wrote a primer about the language," said an ode to Kagan when he
        > was honored as 2007 Hobbyist of the Year by the Amateur Computer Group of
        > New Jersey.
        >
        > ...
      • evan@snarc.net
        Oh no!!!! I hope our friend Claude is okay. I will try to call him. ... From: Ben Combee Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 12:07:49 To:
        Message 3 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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          Oh no!!!!

          I hope our friend Claude is okay. I will try to call him.


          From: Ben Combee <ben.combee@...>
          Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 12:07:49 -0500
          To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [midatlanticretro] Oh no! RESISTORS burns down

          http://www.trentonian.com/articles/2009/12/04/news/doc4b1888f3ca007384474191.txt

          HOPEWELL TWP. — Windswept flames 50 feet high yesterday destroyed the local barn where computer programming first flourished, beneath an imported stage that was first used at the New York Worlds Fair of 1964.

          The 50-by-100 foot building on the property of computer pioneer Claude A.R. Kagan, now 85, gained a reputation in the late ‘60s and ‘70s as a hangout for misfits from Hopewell Valley High and Princeton — kids whom Kagan said he pulled away from pot and turned on to computers.

          Early members of that first 1967 computer club in New Jersey, known as the RESISTORS, wrote programs in SAM76, Kagan’s own early computer language, “and even wrote a primer about the language,” said an ode to Kagan when he was honored as 2007 Hobbyist of the Year by the Amateur Computer Group of New Jersey.

          ...
        • ysgdhio
          BoingBoing has already picked it up... http://www.boingboing.net/2009/12/04/historic-resistors-r.html
          Message 4 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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          • Evan Koblentz
            Talked to Claude just now. He is fine. He was sleeping inside his house and has no idea how the fire started next door. He said the most likely thing was an
            Message 5 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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              Talked to Claude just now.  He is fine.  He was sleeping inside his house and has no idea how the fire started next door.  He said the most likely thing was an electrical problem (those of us who've been inside the barn know how chaotic it was), but, he also said the fire department didn't find anything that indicated electrical trouble.

              He said Herb is there right now helping to run a generator, while the electric utility is scheduled to be there soon.

              I asked twice if there is anything we can do to help, but he said there's nothing needed at this point.

              He sounded surprisingly calm for an 85-year-old whose barn full of priceless memories and equipment just burned down ....

              After confirming multiple times that he is okay, I finally asked about the contents of the barn -- the B-205, IBM 026, etc.  All he said was, "Mush. All mush."

              A sad today for local computer history.



              ---------------------------------------------
              Oh no!!!!

              I hope our friend Claude is okay. I will try to call him.


              From: Ben Combee <ben.combee@...>
              Date: Fri, 4 Dec 2009 12:07:49 -0500
              Subject: [midatlanticretro] Oh no! RESISTORS burns down

              http://www.trentonian.com/articles/2009/12/04/news/doc4b1888f3ca007384474191.txt

              HOPEWELL TWP. — Windswept flames 50 feet high yesterday destroyed the local barn where computer programming first flourished, beneath an imported stage that was first used at the New York Worlds Fair of 1964.
            • Brian Schenkenberger, VAXman-
              ... Very sad indeed. You d have thought, since he apparently thought highly of his amassed history, that he would have made some arrangement to place it in a
              Message 6 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                Evan Koblentz <evan@...> writes:

                >Talked to Claude just now. He is fine. He was sleeping inside his
                >house and has no idea how the fire started next door. He said the most
                >likely thing was an electrical problem (those of us who've been inside
                >the barn know how chaotic it was), but, he also said the fire department
                >didn't find anything that indicated electrical trouble.
                >
                >He said Herb is there right now helping to run a generator, while the
                >electric utility is scheduled to be there soon.
                >
                >I asked twice if there is anything we can do to help, but he said
                >there's nothing needed at this point.
                >
                >He sounded surprisingly calm for an 85-year-old whose barn full of
                >priceless memories and equipment just burned down ....
                >
                >After confirming multiple times that he is okay, I finally asked about
                >the contents of the barn -- the B-205, IBM 026, etc. All he said was,
                >"Mush. All mush."
                >
                >A sad today for local computer history.

                Very sad indeed. You'd have thought, since he apparently thought highly
                of his amassed history, that he would have made some arrangement to place
                it in a museum with his advancing age. However, having lost two 95 year
                old grandmonthers this year, I know these old folks have a way of holding
                on to their material memories as if they'll somehow take them with.

                --
                VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

                "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
              • Evan Koblentz
                ... That process was underway. About 18 months ago, when MARCH and InfoAge really started to grow, he offered the 205 to us. I replied and told him how
                Message 7 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                  > Very sad indeed. You'd have thought, since he apparently thought highly of his amassed history, that he would have made some arrangement to place it in a museum with his advancing age

                  That process was underway. About 18 months ago, when MARCH and InfoAge
                  really started to grow, he offered the 205 to us. I replied and told
                  him how grateful we are, but that we just don't have the resources or
                  experience to accept a system that large. Merely the cost of
                  transporting the 205 would have dwarfed our tiny budget. Instead, I
                  told him that I think the CHM in California is a much better home for
                  it. Claude thanked me for being so honest, and we brought a CHM person
                  into the loop (curator Dag Spicer, who is a good friend to the hobby
                  side, supports VCF out there, etc.) At that point, I stepped to the
                  side while Claude and CHM began making arrangements.

                  Now, it's clear that the effort was too little, too late. :(

                  At least we saved the PDP-8 in time.
                • Brian Schenkenberger, VAXman-
                  ... A bittersweet consolation. -- VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn t
                  Message 8 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                    Evan Koblentz <evan@...> writes:

                    >> Very sad indeed. You'd have thought, since he apparently thought
                    >highly of his amassed history, that he would have made some arrangement
                    >to place it in a museum with his advancing age
                    >
                    >That process was underway. About 18 months ago, when MARCH and InfoAge
                    >really started to grow, he offered the 205 to us. I replied and told
                    >him how grateful we are, but that we just don't have the resources or
                    >experience to accept a system that large. Merely the cost of
                    >transporting the 205 would have dwarfed our tiny budget. Instead, I
                    >told him that I think the CHM in California is a much better home for
                    >it. Claude thanked me for being so honest, and we brought a CHM person
                    >into the loop (curator Dag Spicer, who is a good friend to the hobby
                    >side, supports VCF out there, etc.) At that point, I stepped to the
                    >side while Claude and CHM began making arrangements.
                    >
                    >Now, it's clear that the effort was too little, too late. :(
                    >
                    >At least we saved the PDP-8 in time.

                    A bittersweet consolation.

                    --
                    VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

                    "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
                  • Christian Liendo
                    Speechless... I am happy Claude is OK. Out of anything that is Resistors, he is the most important. BTW: This should remind people at info age to check their
                    Message 9 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                      Speechless...

                      I am happy Claude is OK. Out of anything that is Resistors, he is the most important.

                      BTW: This should remind people at info age to check their electrical

                    • Evan Koblentz
                      ... For anyone wondering: - InfoAge has a licensed electrician on staff. He s a volunteer like the rest of us, but he s there all the time - Most of our
                      Message 10 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                         BTW: This should remind people at info age to check their electrical

                        For anyone wondering:
                        - InfoAge has a licensed electrician on staff.  He's a volunteer like the rest of us, but he's there all the time
                        - Most of our important buildings are brick, not wood.
                        - Money is already being budgeted for sprinkler systems, etc., although it will take a while for full coverage ... some buildings are limited because of their 1912 designs .....
                        - Between the electrician and Fireman Nels (Fort Monmouth's fire chief who also runs the InfoAge Halloween event), our campus has been inspected many times.

                        Only once was there a fire "event" at InfoAge.  A year or two ago, there was a small floor-standing electrical heater in the Hotel basement.  It decided to melt and some smoke got into the first floor.  No damage and no flames.
                      • Dan Roganti
                        I m terribly sorry to hear about his loss Thankfully he s still alive and well - that s what counts. =Dan -- http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/
                        Message 11 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                          I'm terribly sorry to hear about his loss
                          Thankfully he's still alive and well - that's what counts.

                          =Dan
                          -- 
                          http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/
                          http://www.midatlanticretro.org/



                          Evan Koblentz wrote:
                          Talked to Claude just now.  He is fine.  He was sleeping inside his house and has no idea how the fire started next door.  He said the most likely thing was an electrical problem (those of us who've been inside the barn know how chaotic it was), but, he also said the fire department didn't find anything that indicated electrical trouble.

                          He said Herb is there right now helping to run a generator, while the electric utility is scheduled to be there soon.

                          I asked twice if there is anything we can do to help, but he said there's nothing needed at this point.

                          He sounded surprisingly calm for an 85-year-old whose barn full of priceless memories and equipment just burned down ....

                          After confirming multiple times that he is okay, I finally asked about the contents of the barn -- the B-205, IBM 026, etc.  All he said was, "Mush. All mush."

                          A sad today for local computer history.

                        • Evan Koblentz
                          Herb sent me an email. Him and Will Donzelli were both at Claude s house to help out today. Herb added: there s nothing to be done with the barn or contents
                          Message 12 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                            Herb sent me an email.  Him and Will Donzelli were both at Claude's house to help out today.  Herb added: "there's nothing to be done with the barn or contents because they were all completely destroyed. Any cleanup will require commercial and professional resources. Claude may release photos at some point."

                            ---------------------------------------------
                            Talked to Claude just now.  He is fine.  He was sleeping inside his house and has no idea how the fire started next door.  He said the most likely thing was an electrical problem (those of us who've been inside the barn know how chaotic it was), but, he also said the fire department didn't find anything that indicated electrical trouble.

                            He said Herb is there right now helping to run a generator, while the electric utility is scheduled to be there soon.

                            I asked twice if there is anything we can do to help, but he said there's nothing needed at this point.

                            He sounded surprisingly calm for an 85-year-old whose barn full of priceless memories and equipment just burned down ....

                            After confirming multiple times that he is okay, I finally asked about the contents of the barn -- the B-205, IBM 026, etc.  All he said was, "Mush. All mush."

                            A sad today for local computer history.
                          • Joe Giliberti
                            Any idea if arson is being investigated? Not to say that someone had something against Claude or his stuff, but if some crazy, stupid teenagers saw a
                            Message 13 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                              Any idea if arson is being investigated? Not to say that someone had something against Claude or his stuff, but if some crazy, stupid teenagers saw a dilapidated wooden barn...

                              Note: I have never done anything like that. I am just thinking in terms of how I would think if I were more evil


                              On Fri, Dec 4, 2009 at 9:20 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:
                               

                              Herb sent me an email.  Him and Will Donzelli were both at Claude's house to help out today.  Herb added: "there's nothing to be done with the barn or contents because they were all completely destroyed. Any cleanup will require commercial and professional resources. Claude may release photos at some point."

                              ---------------------------------------------

                              Talked to Claude just now.  He is fine.  He was sleeping inside his house and has no idea how the fire started next door.  He said the most likely thing was an electrical problem (those of us who've been inside the barn know how chaotic it was), but, he also said the fire department didn't find anything that indicated electrical trouble.

                              He said Herb is there right now helping to run a generator, while the electric utility is scheduled to be there soon.

                              I asked twice if there is anything we can do to help, but he said there's nothing needed at this point.

                              He sounded surprisingly calm for an 85-year-old whose barn full of priceless memories and equipment just burned down ....

                              After confirming multiple times that he is okay, I finally asked about the contents of the barn -- the B-205, IBM 026, etc.  All he said was, "Mush. All mush."

                              A sad today for local computer history.

                            • Evan Koblentz
                              It s under official investigation. I will leave the possible causes to the professionals.
                              Message 14 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                                It's under official investigation.  I will leave the possible causes to the professionals.

                                ---------------------------------------------
                                  Any idea if arson is being investigated? Not to say that someone had something against Claude or his stuff, but if some crazy, stupid teenagers saw a dilapidated wooden barn...
                              • Evan Koblentz
                                Today s news made me recall some B-205 web sites that I saw in the past. One of them focuses on all the movies in which the 205 had a role:
                                Message 15 of 21 , Dec 4, 2009
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                                  Today's news made me recall some B-205 web sites that I saw in the
                                  past. One of them focuses on all the movies in which the 205 had a role:
                                  http://starringthecomputer.com/computer.php?c=45

                                  This other site has lots of technical information and some manuals:
                                  http://www.cs.virginia.edu/brochure/museum.html

                                  One fewer vacuum tube computer now exists in the world. I'm very upset
                                  that the timing of Claude offering the 205 did not match our ability to
                                  rescue it. That is not anyone's fault, just bad timing.
                                • Dan Roganti
                                  Evan Koblentz wrote: One fewer vacuum tube computer now exists in the world. I m very upset that the timing of Claude offering the 205 did not match our
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Dec 5, 2009
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                                    Evan Koblentz wrote:
                                    One fewer vacuum tube computer now exists in the world.  I'm very upset 
                                    that the timing of Claude offering the 205 did not match our ability to 
                                    rescue it.  That is not anyone's fault, just bad timing.
                                      

                                    Please don't turn down anything like this in the future.

                                    where there's a will, there always a way.

                                    =Dan
                                    -- 
                                    http://home.comcast.net/~ragooman/
                                    http://www.midatlanticretro.org/
                                    
                                  • evan@snarc.net
                                    ... I can assure you it was a very tough decision. The main factors were our resources (very few) vs. the computer s alternative fate (world s best and most
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Dec 5, 2009
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                                      >>> Please don't turn down anything like this in the future. where there's a will, there always a way

                                      I can assure you it was a very tough decision.

                                      The main factors were our resources (very few) vs. the computer's alternative fate (world's best and most professional computer museum).

                                      I made the realistic choice. For MARCH, the largest computer we ever rescued is the System/38. That required a budget outlay of roughly $400, a huge favor from Nels, and use of InfoAge's forklift. I kept chanting to myself all day long, "This is worth it ... This is worth it ...
                                    • evan@snarc.net
                                      Oops! I clicked send by accident before I was done typing. Read on... ... I can assure you it was a very tough decision. The main factors were our resources
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Dec 5, 2009
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                                        Oops! I clicked 'send' by accident before I was done typing. Read on...

                                        >>> Please don't turn down anything like this in the future. where there's a will, there always a way

                                        I can assure you it was a very tough decision.

                                        The main factors were our resources (very few) vs. the computer's alternative fate (world's best and most professional computer museum).

                                        I made the realistic choice. For MARCH, the largest computer we ever rescued is the System/38. That required a budget outlay of roughly $400, a huge favor from Nels, and use of InfoAge's forklift. I kept chanting to myself all day long, "This is worth it ... This is worth it ...

                                        To rescue the 205, I figure we would have needed the following resources:
                                        -- someone with the expertise to dissassemble it, in a way that wouldn't damage it, and so it could be put back together
                                        -- one or more forklifts with licensed drivers
                                        -- an army of very strong people to safety move all the other stuff out of the way in the barn
                                        -- an 18-wheeler with a licensed driver
                                        -- more forklifts and another army of very strong people to unload it at infoage
                                        -- fast-forward two years: army of people to reassemble the computer in an exhibit
                                        -- army of people to clean it and make it look presentable

                                        So, Dan, the next time there's a 55-year-old, 9-ton vacuum tube computer in the back of an 85-year-old blind man's barn, located a good 50 feet off the paved road and surrounded by trees and a mud path, which requires all kinds of help and the cost of a HUGE truck rental, etc., then .... I'm assigning you to be the project manager for that rescue, mmm 'kay?

                                        :)

                                        Alternative, which is what was actually being planned: CHM, with its multi-million-dollar budget, experience, know-how, and more resources on a bad day than we have in a five good years, could just come get it.

                                        Claude himself thanked me for acknowledging that, and complimented me for taking the high road and doing what was best for the computer.

                                        That's the story.
                                      • Dan Roganti
                                        evan@snarc.net wrote: Oops! I clicked send by accident before I was done typing. Read on... Please don t turn down anything like this in the future. where
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Dec 5, 2009
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                                          evan@... wrote:
                                          Oops! I clicked 'send' by accident before I was done typing. Read on...
                                          
                                            
                                          Please don't turn down anything like this in the future. where there's a will, there always a way
                                                  
                                          I can assure you it was a very tough decision.
                                          
                                          The main factors were our resources (very few) vs. the computer's alternative fate (world's best and most professional computer museum).
                                          
                                          I made the realistic choice. For MARCH, the largest computer we ever rescued is the System/38. That required a budget outlay of roughly $400, a huge favor from Nels, and use of InfoAge's forklift. I kept chanting to myself all day long, "This is worth it ... This is worth it ... 
                                          
                                          To rescue the 205, I figure we would have needed the following resources:
                                          -- someone with the expertise to dissassemble it, in a way that wouldn't damage it, and so it could be put back together
                                          -- one or more forklifts with licensed drivers
                                          -- an army of very strong people to safety move all the other stuff out of the way in the barn
                                          -- an 18-wheeler with a licensed driver
                                          -- more forklifts and another army of very strong people to unload it at infoage
                                          -- fast-forward two years: army of people to reassemble the computer in an exhibit
                                          -- army of people to clean it and make it look presentable
                                          
                                          So, Dan, the next time there's a 55-year-old, 9-ton vacuum tube computer in the back of an 85-year-old blind man's barn, located a good 50 feet off the paved road and surrounded by trees and a mud path, which requires all kinds of help and the cost of a HUGE truck rental, etc., then .... I'm assigning you to be the project manager for that rescue, mmm 'kay?
                                          
                                          :)
                                          
                                          Alternative, which is what was actually being planned: CHM, with its multi-million-dollar budget, experience, know-how, and more resources on a bad day than we have in a five good years, could just come get it.
                                          
                                          Claude himself thanked me for acknowledging that, and complimented me for taking the high road and doing what was best for the computer.
                                          
                                          
                                            

                                          Please let me assure you I know how realistic this sounds, this is not the first for me.
                                          But also, it's not the impossible, exceedingly technical,  nor extremely expensive.
                                          If I lived any closer, I'd be glad to help, maybe the next time I visit.

                                          =Dan
                                          -- 
                                          http://home.comcast.net/~ragooman/
                                          http://www.midatlanticretro.org/
                                          
                                        • jack99rubin
                                          I don t know how many people tried to rescue the B-205 over the years, or how many people knew about it. I tried to facilitate a rescue with the Rhode Island
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Dec 5, 2009
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                                            I don't know how many people tried to rescue the B-205 over the years, or how many people knew about it. I tried to facilitate a rescue with the Rhode Island guys a few years back, probably just as MARCH was getting started, but it never came to anything. My contacts there were too flakey and Claude wasn't having any of it.

                                            Sorry to learn of the loss but glad Claude is OK. Hopefully he will get an insurance settlement that will ease other aspects of his life. Glad Herb and Will are on the ground to help him out. Is there anything that can be done long-distance to assist?

                                            Jack

                                            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, evan@... wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Oops! I clicked 'send' by accident before I was done typing. Read on...
                                            >
                                            > >>> Please don't turn down anything like this in the future. where there's a will, there always a way
                                            >
                                            > I can assure you it was a very tough decision.
                                            >
                                            > The main factors were our resources (very few) vs. the computer's alternative fate (world's best and most professional computer museum).
                                            >
                                            > I made the realistic choice. For MARCH, the largest computer we ever rescued is the System/38. That required a budget outlay of roughly $400, a huge favor from Nels, and use of InfoAge's forklift. I kept chanting to myself all day long, "This is worth it ... This is worth it ...
                                            >
                                            > To rescue the 205, I figure we would have needed the following resources:
                                            > -- someone with the expertise to dissassemble it, in a way that wouldn't damage it, and so it could be put back together
                                            > -- one or more forklifts with licensed drivers
                                            > -- an army of very strong people to safety move all the other stuff out of the way in the barn
                                            > -- an 18-wheeler with a licensed driver
                                            > -- more forklifts and another army of very strong people to unload it at infoage
                                            > -- fast-forward two years: army of people to reassemble the computer in an exhibit
                                            > -- army of people to clean it and make it look presentable
                                            >
                                            > So, Dan, the next time there's a 55-year-old, 9-ton vacuum tube computer in the back of an 85-year-old blind man's barn, located a good 50 feet off the paved road and surrounded by trees and a mud path, which requires all kinds of help and the cost of a HUGE truck rental, etc., then .... I'm assigning you to be the project manager for that rescue, mmm 'kay?
                                            >
                                            > :)
                                            >
                                            > Alternative, which is what was actually being planned: CHM, with its multi-million-dollar budget, experience, know-how, and more resources on a bad day than we have in a five good years, could just come get it.
                                            >
                                            > Claude himself thanked me for acknowledging that, and complimented me for taking the high road and doing what was best for the computer.
                                            >
                                            > That's the story.
                                            >
                                          • evan@snarc.net
                                            I m told he is all set. He has local help from family and friends. His mood is also upbeat, considering what happened. ... From: jack99rubin
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Dec 5, 2009
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                                              I'm told he is all set. He has local help from family and friends. His mood is also upbeat, considering what happened.

                                              -----Original Message-----
                                              From: "jack99rubin" <jack.rubin@...>
                                              Date: Sat, 05 Dec 2009 17:55:19
                                              To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
                                              Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: Oh no! RESISTORS burns down

                                              I don't know how many people tried to rescue the B-205 over the years, or how many people knew about it. I tried to facilitate a rescue with the Rhode Island guys a few years back, probably just as MARCH was getting started, but it never came to anything. My contacts there were too flakey and Claude wasn't having any of it.

                                              Sorry to learn of the loss but glad Claude is OK. Hopefully he will get an insurance settlement that will ease other aspects of his life. Glad Herb and Will are on the ground to help him out. Is there anything that can be done long-distance to assist?

                                              Jack

                                              --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, evan@... wrote:
                                              >
                                              > Oops! I clicked 'send' by accident before I was done typing. Read on...
                                              >
                                              > >>> Please don't turn down anything like this in the future. where there's a will, there always a way
                                              >
                                              > I can assure you it was a very tough decision.
                                              >
                                              > The main factors were our resources (very few) vs. the computer's alternative fate (world's best and most professional computer museum).
                                              >
                                              > I made the realistic choice. For MARCH, the largest computer we ever rescued is the System/38. That required a budget outlay of roughly $400, a huge favor from Nels, and use of InfoAge's forklift. I kept chanting to myself all day long, "This is worth it ... This is worth it ...
                                              >
                                              > To rescue the 205, I figure we would have needed the following resources:
                                              > -- someone with the expertise to dissassemble it, in a way that wouldn't damage it, and so it could be put back together
                                              > -- one or more forklifts with licensed drivers
                                              > -- an army of very strong people to safety move all the other stuff out of the way in the barn
                                              > -- an 18-wheeler with a licensed driver
                                              > -- more forklifts and another army of very strong people to unload it at infoage
                                              > -- fast-forward two years: army of people to reassemble the computer in an exhibit
                                              > -- army of people to clean it and make it look presentable
                                              >
                                              > So, Dan, the next time there's a 55-year-old, 9-ton vacuum tube computer in the back of an 85-year-old blind man's barn, located a good 50 feet off the paved road and surrounded by trees and a mud path, which requires all kinds of help and the cost of a HUGE truck rental, etc., then .... I'm assigning you to be the project manager for that rescue, mmm 'kay?
                                              >
                                              > :)
                                              >
                                              > Alternative, which is what was actually being planned: CHM, with its multi-million-dollar budget, experience, know-how, and more resources on a bad day than we have in a five good years, could just come get it.
                                              >
                                              > Claude himself thanked me for acknowledging that, and complimented me for taking the high road and doing what was best for the computer.
                                              >
                                              > That's the story.
                                              >




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