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Important: Year-End Summary & Looking at 2010

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  • Evan Koblentz
    Helloooooooooo, MARCHins! Our club had one heck of a 2009. Our spring party had a great turnout. We worked on members computers, grilled burgers, watched
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Helloooooooooo, MARCHins!

      Our club had one heck of a 2009.

      Our spring party had a great turnout. We worked on members' computers,
      grilled burgers, watched Spaceballs on a 10-foot projection screen ...
      our party was so good that people from other InfoAge groups crashed it
      to join in the fun. Nobody named "Salahi" though. :)

      At the Trenton show, in April, we heard more comments than ever along
      the lines of, "Your booth is the only thing here worth seeing." That's
      not to disparage the hard work of ACGNJ and the Trenton people; it just
      shows how people get bored with ordinary PC shows and how what we do is
      so unique.

      In the summer we went into full-blown museum mode. We doubled the size
      of our exhibit square footage, and we expanded from 1.5 exhibits
      (microcomputers and "other") to four exhibits (microcomputers;
      minicomputers; homebrew computers; computers of Camp Evans).

      VCF, in September, was AMAZING. Its statistics grew across the board
      for the history of VCF East events (the four we did, plus the two Sellam
      ran before us): more exhibits, more attendance in numbers, more diverse
      attendance in demographics, more special events, more profit, more
      media, more fun!!!

      Now, we're nearing the holiday party, which will certainly be just as
      fun as our spring party and last year's winter party BernieS likes to
      call it the "Vintage Computer Festivus" which sounds good to me. He's
      also seeing if some of the 8-bit music guys want to provide the
      entertainment, and we may also take a little field trip to the pinball
      arcade.

      MARCH is also doing okay I.T.-wise. Our primary I.T. requirement is web
      hosting, which is all FREE as in beer. Yahoo takes care of our mailing
      list; Bill Degnan graciously hosts our web site; Sellam provides the VCF
      site.

      Then there's the business side of things. As of today, we have
      approximately $2,000 in the bank, and we have no debt at all.

      Of course, the more our events and museum grow, the more our expenses
      grow in parallel.

      For example, in the spring 2009 - spring 2010 period, our liability
      insurance was $690. As our museum square footage expands, that figure
      increases. this year it could easily be $750 or more (although we're
      trying hard to keep it in check, and we may be tempted to shop elsewhere
      if our agent doesn't cooperate.)

      With VCF, it's all about upfront costs: ordering supplies, organizing
      the breakfast and lunch to sell, buying the t-shirts, making a humble
      post-VCF donations back to InfoAge and VintageTech, and more. Luckily
      the BIGGEST expenses are things we get for free: venue (InfoAge) and
      advertising (word-of-mouth, hobby forums, etc.)

      In the museum, we often need to acquire display cases, sturdy tables,
      good-quality tablecloths, bookcases, and a variety of general supplies.
      In the past we've gotten a lot of this stuff for free in the form of
      hand-me-downs. But as our exhibits and InfoAge itself grows, the bar is
      constantly being raised, and the quality of our exhibits must raise with it.

      Another museum issue is utilities. InfoAge provides the building, and
      often pays the bills for carpet, paint, etc., which is awesome of them.
      But again, as the facility grows and becomes more successful, and *
      especially * as InfoAge prepares to expand into the legendary
      H-buildings, the various member clubs will need to start contributing
      more to the bottom line. There isn't currently a deadline or an amount
      decided, but we need to start preparing to give money back to our host.

      Yet again on the museum side, is the issue of the artifacts. Life was
      easy when all we had were microcomputers. Now, we have a very
      impressive collection of homebrew computers and minicomputers. I know
      for fact that some of of the more hardcore collectors on CCtalk are
      lusting after things like our PDP-8. They can't have it, but they can
      come visit anytime. :) The point is, as our museum acquires this more
      serious collection, it costs money. A few months ago we had to rent a
      box truck with a lift gate to get a "free" IBM System/38 from upstate
      New York. Next week, Bill is going to rent another truck to get the
      control station of our "free" Burroughs L-7000. In many other cases,
      individual members such as me, Joe G., David G., and a bunch of others
      all contributed time and fuel using their own vehicles, solely to help
      MARCH build its collection.

      Finally, there's the topic of MARCH member dues: we don't charge any!
      Andy and I formed the group just for kicks and grins in summer/fall of
      2004. We never fathomed that it would became what it is now. Even if
      we knew it would succeed, we definitely didn't want to deal with running
      a formal entity. We just wanted to meet people and tinker on
      computers. So, MARCH membership was, is, and shall always remain
      open-source.

      All we ask is this: if you use it and you like it, then please help pay
      for it.

      Please go on over to http://www.midatlanticretro.org and click the
      orange "Make a donation" icon in the top left corner.

      Any amount, from one buck to serious endowments, is equally appreciated.

      If someone were to ask me for a "suggested" amount, then I'd say that
      anywhere from $20 to $50 is reasonable for an employed adult techie.

      If you can't afford to give this year, we understand. Personally I was
      unemployed from the middle of January until a few weeks ago, and yes, I
      struggled. So do not feel guilty if you can't help us raise money.

      If you CAN afford to help us, and if you can afford to be more generous
      than the suggested amounts, then feel free to email me in private at
      evan@.... For amounts of $100 and up, we can discuss situations
      where InfoAge can provide 501c3 tax receipts, with the donation going
      toward MARCH.

      Speaking of which: currently we're a not-for-profit company in the State
      of New Jersey, however, Justin is working on making us a direct 501c3.
      That way we don't have to work through InfoAge to get tax receipts,
      etc., but it will take several months, maybe more, before this process
      is finished.

      Currently the club officers are:
      Me (Evan Koblentz) - president
      Andy Meyer / Bill Degnan - vice presidents
      Jim Scheef - outgoing treasurer
      Justin Jernigan - incoming treasurer

      Thanks again to everyone for MARCH's kick-ass 2009, and thank you all in
      advance for helping us do even better in 2010. My ears are ** ALWAYS **
      open for suggestions about how the club can improve, so email me
      anytime, or call me any evening at (646) 546-9999.

      - Evan
    • Andrew Molloy
      Awesome summary, Evan. I m going to go hit that donate button now. Andy
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 3, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Awesome summary, Evan. I'm going to go hit that donate button now.

        Andy

        On Thu, Dec 3, 2009 at 5:48 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:
         

        Helloooooooooo, MARCHins!

        Our club had one heck of a 2009.

        Our spring party had a great turnout. We worked on members' computers,
        grilled burgers, watched Spaceballs on a 10-foot projection screen ...
        our party was so good that people from other InfoAge groups crashed it
        to join in the fun. Nobody named "Salahi" though. :)

        At the Trenton show, in April, we heard more comments than ever along
        the lines of, "Your booth is the only thing here worth seeing." That's
        not to disparage the hard work of ACGNJ and the Trenton people; it just
        shows how people get bored with ordinary PC shows and how what we do is
        so unique.

        In the summer we went into full-blown museum mode. We doubled the size
        of our exhibit square footage, and we expanded from 1.5 exhibits
        (microcomputers and "other") to four exhibits (microcomputers;
        minicomputers; homebrew computers; computers of Camp Evans).

        VCF, in September, was AMAZING. Its statistics grew across the board
        for the history of VCF East events (the four we did, plus the two Sellam
        ran before us): more exhibits, more attendance in numbers, more diverse
        attendance in demographics, more special events, more profit, more
        media, more fun!!!

        Now, we're nearing the holiday party, which will certainly be just as
        fun as our spring party and last year's winter party BernieS likes to
        call it the "Vintage Computer Festivus" which sounds good to me. He's
        also seeing if some of the 8-bit music guys want to provide the
        entertainment, and we may also take a little field trip to the pinball
        arcade.

        MARCH is also doing okay I.T.-wise. Our primary I.T. requirement is web
        hosting, which is all FREE as in beer. Yahoo takes care of our mailing
        list; Bill Degnan graciously hosts our web site; Sellam provides the VCF
        site.

        Then there's the business side of things. As of today, we have
        approximately $2,000 in the bank, and we have no debt at all.

        Of course, the more our events and museum grow, the more our expenses
        grow in parallel.

        For example, in the spring 2009 - spring 2010 period, our liability
        insurance was $690. As our museum square footage expands, that figure
        increases. this year it could easily be $750 or more (although we're
        trying hard to keep it in check, and we may be tempted to shop elsewhere
        if our agent doesn't cooperate.)

        With VCF, it's all about upfront costs: ordering supplies, organizing
        the breakfast and lunch to sell, buying the t-shirts, making a humble
        post-VCF donations back to InfoAge and VintageTech, and more. Luckily
        the BIGGEST expenses are things we get for free: venue (InfoAge) and
        advertising (word-of-mouth, hobby forums, etc.)

        In the museum, we often need to acquire display cases, sturdy tables,
        good-quality tablecloths, bookcases, and a variety of general supplies.
        In the past we've gotten a lot of this stuff for free in the form of
        hand-me-downs. But as our exhibits and InfoAge itself grows, the bar is
        constantly being raised, and the quality of our exhibits must raise with it.

        Another museum issue is utilities. InfoAge provides the building, and
        often pays the bills for carpet, paint, etc., which is awesome of them.
        But again, as the facility grows and becomes more successful, and *
        especially * as InfoAge prepares to expand into the legendary
        H-buildings, the various member clubs will need to start contributing
        more to the bottom line. There isn't currently a deadline or an amount
        decided, but we need to start preparing to give money back to our host.

        Yet again on the museum side, is the issue of the artifacts. Life was
        easy when all we had were microcomputers. Now, we have a very
        impressive collection of homebrew computers and minicomputers. I know
        for fact that some of of the more hardcore collectors on CCtalk are
        lusting after things like our PDP-8. They can't have it, but they can
        come visit anytime. :) The point is, as our museum acquires this more
        serious collection, it costs money. A few months ago we had to rent a
        box truck with a lift gate to get a "free" IBM System/38 from upstate
        New York. Next week, Bill is going to rent another truck to get the
        control station of our "free" Burroughs L-7000. In many other cases,
        individual members such as me, Joe G., David G., and a bunch of others
        all contributed time and fuel using their own vehicles, solely to help
        MARCH build its collection.

        Finally, there's the topic of MARCH member dues: we don't charge any!
        Andy and I formed the group just for kicks and grins in summer/fall of
        2004. We never fathomed that it would became what it is now. Even if
        we knew it would succeed, we definitely didn't want to deal with running
        a formal entity. We just wanted to meet people and tinker on
        computers. So, MARCH membership was, is, and shall always remain
        open-source.

        All we ask is this: if you use it and you like it, then please help pay
        for it.

        Please go on over to http://www.midatlanticretro.org and click the
        orange "Make a donation" icon in the top left corner.

        Any amount, from one buck to serious endowments, is equally appreciated.

        If someone were to ask me for a "suggested" amount, then I'd say that
        anywhere from $20 to $50 is reasonable for an employed adult techie.

        If you can't afford to give this year, we understand. Personally I was
        unemployed from the middle of January until a few weeks ago, and yes, I
        struggled. So do not feel guilty if you can't help us raise money.

        If you CAN afford to help us, and if you can afford to be more generous
        than the suggested amounts, then feel free to email me in private at
        evan@.... For amounts of $100 and up, we can discuss situations
        where InfoAge can provide 501c3 tax receipts, with the donation going
        toward MARCH.

        Speaking of which: currently we're a not-for-profit company in the State
        of New Jersey, however, Justin is working on making us a direct 501c3.
        That way we don't have to work through InfoAge to get tax receipts,
        etc., but it will take several months, maybe more, before this process
        is finished.

        Currently the club officers are:
        Me (Evan Koblentz) - president
        Andy Meyer / Bill Degnan - vice presidents
        Jim Scheef - outgoing treasurer
        Justin Jernigan - incoming treasurer

        Thanks again to everyone for MARCH's kick-ass 2009, and thank you all in
        advance for helping us do even better in 2010. My ears are ** ALWAYS **
        open for suggestions about how the club can improve, so email me
        anytime, or call me any evening at (646) 546-9999.

        - Evan


      • Evan Koblentz
        Bump. Two people already contributed. Won t you be next?
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 4, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Bump.

          Two people already contributed. Won't you be next?

          ---------------------------------------------
          > Helloooooooooo, MARCHins!
          >
          > Our club had one heck of a 2009.
          >
          > Our spring party had a great turnout. We worked on members' computers, grilled burgers, watched Spaceballs on a 10-foot projection screen ... our party was so good that people from other InfoAge groups crashed it to join in the fun. Nobody named "Salahi" though. :)
          >
          > At the Trenton show, in April, we heard more comments than ever along the lines of, "Your booth is the only thing here worth seeing." That's not to disparage the hard work of ACGNJ and the Trenton people; it just shows how people get bored with ordinary PC shows and how what we do is so unique.
          >
          > In the summer we went into full-blown museum mode. We doubled the size of our exhibit square footage, and we expanded from 1.5 exhibits (microcomputers and "other") to four exhibits (microcomputers; minicomputers; homebrew computers; computers of Camp Evans).
          >
          > VCF, in September, was AMAZING. Its statistics grew across the board for the history of VCF East events (the four we did, plus the two Sellam ran before us): more exhibits, more attendance in numbers, more diverse attendance in demographics, more special events, more profit, more media, more fun!!!
          >
          > Now, we're nearing the holiday party, which will certainly be just as fun as our spring party and last year's winter party BernieS likes to call it the "Vintage Computer Festivus" which sounds good to me. He's
          > also seeing if some of the 8-bit music guys want to provide the entertainment, and we may also take a little field trip to the pinball arcade.
          >
          > MARCH is also doing okay I.T.-wise. Our primary I.T. requirement is web hosting, which is all FREE as in beer. Yahoo takes care of our mailing list; Bill Degnan graciously hosts our web site; Sellam provides the VCF site.
          >
          > Then there's the business side of things. As of today, we have approximately $2,000 in the bank, and we have no debt at all.
          >
          > Of course, the more our events and museum grow, the more our expenses grow in parallel.
          >
          > For example, in the spring 2009 - spring 2010 period, our liability insurance was $690. As our museum square footage expands, that figure increases. this year it could easily be $750 or more (although we're trying hard to keep it in check, and we may be tempted to shop elsewhere if our agent doesn't cooperate.)
          >
          > With VCF, it's all about upfront costs: ordering supplies, organizing the breakfast and lunch to sell, buying the t-shirts, making a humble post-VCF donations back to InfoAge and VintageTech, and more. Luckily the BIGGEST expenses are things we get for free: venue (InfoAge) and advertising (word-of-mouth, hobby forums, etc.)
          >
          > In the museum, we often need to acquire display cases, sturdy tables, good-quality tablecloths, bookcases, and a variety of general supplies. In the past we've gotten a lot of this stuff for free in the form of
          > hand-me-downs. But as our exhibits and InfoAge itself grows, the bar is constantly being raised, and the quality of our exhibits must raise with it.
          >
          > Another museum issue is utilities. InfoAge provides the building, and often pays the bills for carpet, paint, etc., which is awesome of them. But again, as the facility grows and becomes more successful, and *
          > especially * as InfoAge prepares to expand into the legendary H-buildings, the various member clubs will need to start contributing more to the bottom line. There isn't currently a deadline or an amount decided, but we need to start preparing to give money back to our host.
          >
          > Yet again on the museum side, is the issue of the artifacts. Life was easy when all we had were microcomputers. Now, we have a very impressive collection of homebrew computers and minicomputers. I know
          > for fact that some of of the more hardcore collectors on CCtalk are lusting after things like our PDP-8. They can't have it, but they can come visit anytime. :) The point is, as our museum acquires this more
          > serious collection, it costs money. A few months ago we had to rent a box truck with a lift gate to get a "free" IBM System/38 from upstate New York. Next week, Bill is going to rent another truck to get the control station of our "free" Burroughs L-7000. In many other cases, individual members such as me, Joe G., David G., and a bunch of others
          > all contributed time and fuel using their own vehicles, solely to help MARCH build its collection.
          >
          > Finally, there's the topic of MARCH member dues: we don't charge any! Andy and I formed the group just for kicks and grins in summer/fall of 2004. We never fathomed that it would became what it is now. Even if we knew it would succeed, we definitely didn't want to deal with running a formal entity. We just wanted to meet people and tinker on
          > computers. So, MARCH membership was, is, and shall always remain open-source.
          >
          > All we ask is this: if you use it and you like it, then please help pay for it.
          >
          > Please go on over to http://www.midatlanticretro.org and click the orange "Make a donation" icon in the top left corner.
          >
          > Any amount, from one buck to serious endowments, is equally appreciated.
          >
          > If someone were to ask me for a "suggested" amount, then I'd say that anywhere from $20 to $50 is reasonable for an employed adult techie.
          >
          > If you can't afford to give this year, we understand. Personally I was unemployed from the middle of January until a few weeks ago, and yes, I struggled. So do not feel guilty if you can't help us raise money.
          >
          > If you CAN afford to help us, and if you can afford to be more generous than the suggested amounts, then feel free to email me in private at evan@.... For amounts of $100 and up, we can discuss situations where InfoAge can provide 501c3 tax receipts, with the donation going toward MARCH.
          >
          > Speaking of which: currently we're a not-for-profit company in the State of New Jersey, however, Justin is working on making us a direct 501c3. That way we don't have to work through InfoAge to get tax receipts, etc., but it will take several months, maybe more, before this process is finished.
          >
          > Currently the club officers are:
          > Me (Evan Koblentz) - president
          > Andy Meyer / Bill Degnan - vice presidents
          > Jim Scheef - outgoing treasurer
          > Justin Jernigan - incoming treasurer
          >
          > Thanks again to everyone for MARCH's kick-ass 2009, and thank you all in advance for helping us do even better in 2010. My ears are ** ALWAYS ** open for suggestions about how the club can improve, so email me anytime, or call me any evening at (646) 546-9999.
          >
          > - Evan
          >
          >
          >
        • Joe Giliberti
          I pulled four Sloan toilet valves, some fire alarm triggers, and an eye wash station out of old Camp Evans buildings today. The Sloan valves go for about $75
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 4, 2009
          • 0 Attachment
            I pulled four Sloan toilet valves, some fire alarm triggers, and an eye wash station out of old Camp Evans buildings today. The Sloan valves go for about $75 each. Can that count as a donation?


            Plus I am broke...

            :) :) :)

            On Fri, Dec 4, 2009 at 2:52 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:
             

            Bump.

            Two people already contributed. Won't you be next?

            ---------------------------------------------


            > Helloooooooooo, MARCHins!
            >
            > Our club had one heck of a 2009.
            >
            > Our spring party had a great turnout. We worked on members' computers, grilled burgers, watched Spaceballs on a 10-foot projection screen ... our party was so good that people from other InfoAge groups crashed it to join in the fun. Nobody named "Salahi" though. :)
            >
            > At the Trenton show, in April, we heard more comments than ever along the lines of, "Your booth is the only thing here worth seeing." That's not to disparage the hard work of ACGNJ and the Trenton people; it just shows how people get bored with ordinary PC shows and how what we do is so unique.
            >
            > In the summer we went into full-blown museum mode. We doubled the size of our exhibit square footage, and we expanded from 1.5 exhibits (microcomputers and "other") to four exhibits (microcomputers; minicomputers; homebrew computers; computers of Camp Evans).
            >
            > VCF, in September, was AMAZING. Its statistics grew across the board for the history of VCF East events (the four we did, plus the two Sellam ran before us): more exhibits, more attendance in numbers, more diverse attendance in demographics, more special events, more profit, more media, more fun!!!
            >
            > Now, we're nearing the holiday party, which will certainly be just as fun as our spring party and last year's winter party BernieS likes to call it the "Vintage Computer Festivus" which sounds good to me. He's
            > also seeing if some of the 8-bit music guys want to provide the entertainment, and we may also take a little field trip to the pinball arcade.
            >
            > MARCH is also doing okay I.T.-wise. Our primary I.T. requirement is web hosting, which is all FREE as in beer. Yahoo takes care of our mailing list; Bill Degnan graciously hosts our web site; Sellam provides the VCF site.
            >
            > Then there's the business side of things. As of today, we have approximately $2,000 in the bank, and we have no debt at all.
            >
            > Of course, the more our events and museum grow, the more our expenses grow in parallel.
            >
            > For example, in the spring 2009 - spring 2010 period, our liability insurance was $690. As our museum square footage expands, that figure increases. this year it could easily be $750 or more (although we're trying hard to keep it in check, and we may be tempted to shop elsewhere if our agent doesn't cooperate.)
            >
            > With VCF, it's all about upfront costs: ordering supplies, organizing the breakfast and lunch to sell, buying the t-shirts, making a humble post-VCF donations back to InfoAge and VintageTech, and more. Luckily the BIGGEST expenses are things we get for free: venue (InfoAge) and advertising (word-of-mouth, hobby forums, etc.)
            >
            > In the museum, we often need to acquire display cases, sturdy tables, good-quality tablecloths, bookcases, and a variety of general supplies. In the past we've gotten a lot of this stuff for free in the form of
            > hand-me-downs. But as our exhibits and InfoAge itself grows, the bar is constantly being raised, and the quality of our exhibits must raise with it.
            >
            > Another museum issue is utilities. InfoAge provides the building, and often pays the bills for carpet, paint, etc., which is awesome of them. But again, as the facility grows and becomes more successful, and *
            > especially * as InfoAge prepares to expand into the legendary H-buildings, the various member clubs will need to start contributing more to the bottom line. There isn't currently a deadline or an amount decided, but we need to start preparing to give money back to our host.
            >
            > Yet again on the museum side, is the issue of the artifacts. Life was easy when all we had were microcomputers. Now, we have a very impressive collection of homebrew computers and minicomputers. I know
            > for fact that some of of the more hardcore collectors on CCtalk are lusting after things like our PDP-8. They can't have it, but they can come visit anytime. :) The point is, as our museum acquires this more
            > serious collection, it costs money. A few months ago we had to rent a box truck with a lift gate to get a "free" IBM System/38 from upstate New York. Next week, Bill is going to rent another truck to get the control station of our "free" Burroughs L-7000. In many other cases, individual members such as me, Joe G., David G., and a bunch of others
            > all contributed time and fuel using their own vehicles, solely to help MARCH build its collection.
            >
            > Finally, there's the topic of MARCH member dues: we don't charge any! Andy and I formed the group just for kicks and grins in summer/fall of 2004. We never fathomed that it would became what it is now. Even if we knew it would succeed, we definitely didn't want to deal with running a formal entity. We just wanted to meet people and tinker on
            > computers. So, MARCH membership was, is, and shall always remain open-source.
            >
            > All we ask is this: if you use it and you like it, then please help pay for it.
            >
            > Please go on over to http://www.midatlanticretro.org and click the orange "Make a donation" icon in the top left corner.
            >
            > Any amount, from one buck to serious endowments, is equally appreciated.
            >
            > If someone were to ask me for a "suggested" amount, then I'd say that anywhere from $20 to $50 is reasonable for an employed adult techie.
            >
            > If you can't afford to give this year, we understand. Personally I was unemployed from the middle of January until a few weeks ago, and yes, I struggled. So do not feel guilty if you can't help us raise money.
            >
            > If you CAN afford to help us, and if you can afford to be more generous than the suggested amounts, then feel free to email me in private at evan@.... For amounts of $100 and up, we can discuss situations where InfoAge can provide 501c3 tax receipts, with the donation going toward MARCH.
            >
            > Speaking of which: currently we're a not-for-profit company in the State of New Jersey, however, Justin is working on making us a direct 501c3. That way we don't have to work through InfoAge to get tax receipts, etc., but it will take several months, maybe more, before this process is finished.
            >
            > Currently the club officers are:
            > Me (Evan Koblentz) - president
            > Andy Meyer / Bill Degnan - vice presidents
            > Jim Scheef - outgoing treasurer
            > Justin Jernigan - incoming treasurer
            >
            > Thanks again to everyone for MARCH's kick-ass 2009, and thank you all in advance for helping us do even better in 2010. My ears are ** ALWAYS ** open for suggestions about how the club can improve, so email me anytime, or call me any evening at (646) 546-9999.
            >
            > - Evan
            >
            >
            >

          • Evan Koblentz
            ... Nobody should feel obligated to explain themselves when it comes to money.
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 4, 2009
            • 0 Attachment
              > Plus I am broke...

              Nobody should feel obligated to explain themselves when it comes to money.
            • Evan Koblentz
              bump
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 15, 2009
              • 0 Attachment
                bump

                ---------------------------------------------
                > Helloooooooooo, MARCHins!
                >
                > Our club had one heck of a 2009.
                >
                > Our spring party had a great turnout. We worked on members' computers,
                > grilled burgers, watched Spaceballs on a 10-foot projection screen ...
                > our party was so good that people from other InfoAge groups crashed it
                > to join in the fun. Nobody named "Salahi" though. :)
                >
                > At the Trenton show, in April, we heard more comments than ever along
                > the lines of, "Your booth is the only thing here worth seeing." That's
                > not to disparage the hard work of ACGNJ and the Trenton people; it just
                > shows how people get bored with ordinary PC shows and how what we do is
                > so unique.
                >
                > In the summer we went into full-blown museum mode. We doubled the size
                > of our exhibit square footage, and we expanded from 1.5 exhibits
                > (microcomputers and "other") to four exhibits (microcomputers;
                > minicomputers; homebrew computers; computers of Camp Evans).
                >
                > VCF, in September, was AMAZING. Its statistics grew across the board
                > for the history of VCF East events (the four we did, plus the two Sellam
                > ran before us): more exhibits, more attendance in numbers, more diverse
                > attendance in demographics, more special events, more profit, more
                > media, more fun!!!
                >
                > Now, we're nearing the holiday party, which will certainly be just as
                > fun as our spring party and last year's winter party BernieS likes to
                > call it the "Vintage Computer Festivus" which sounds good to me. He's
                > also seeing if some of the 8-bit music guys want to provide the
                > entertainment, and we may also take a little field trip to the pinball
                > arcade.
                >
                > MARCH is also doing okay I.T.-wise. Our primary I.T. requirement is web
                > hosting, which is all FREE as in beer. Yahoo takes care of our mailing
                > list; Bill Degnan graciously hosts our web site; Sellam provides the VCF
                > site.
                >
                > Then there's the business side of things. As of today, we have
                > approximately $2,000 in the bank, and we have no debt at all.
                >
                > Of course, the more our events and museum grow, the more our expenses
                > grow in parallel.
                >
                > For example, in the spring 2009 - spring 2010 period, our liability
                > insurance was $690. As our museum square footage expands, that figure
                > increases. this year it could easily be $750 or more (although we're
                > trying hard to keep it in check, and we may be tempted to shop elsewhere
                > if our agent doesn't cooperate.)
                >
                > With VCF, it's all about upfront costs: ordering supplies, organizing
                > the breakfast and lunch to sell, buying the t-shirts, making a humble
                > post-VCF donations back to InfoAge and VintageTech, and more. Luckily
                > the BIGGEST expenses are things we get for free: venue (InfoAge) and
                > advertising (word-of-mouth, hobby forums, etc.)
                >
                > In the museum, we often need to acquire display cases, sturdy tables,
                > good-quality tablecloths, bookcases, and a variety of general supplies.
                > In the past we've gotten a lot of this stuff for free in the form of
                > hand-me-downs. But as our exhibits and InfoAge itself grows, the bar is
                > constantly being raised, and the quality of our exhibits must raise with it.
                >
                > Another museum issue is utilities. InfoAge provides the building, and
                > often pays the bills for carpet, paint, etc., which is awesome of them.
                > But again, as the facility grows and becomes more successful, and *
                > especially * as InfoAge prepares to expand into the legendary
                > H-buildings, the various member clubs will need to start contributing
                > more to the bottom line. There isn't currently a deadline or an amount
                > decided, but we need to start preparing to give money back to our host.
                >
                > Yet again on the museum side, is the issue of the artifacts. Life was
                > easy when all we had were microcomputers. Now, we have a very
                > impressive collection of homebrew computers and minicomputers. I know
                > for fact that some of of the more hardcore collectors on CCtalk are
                > lusting after things like our PDP-8. They can't have it, but they can
                > come visit anytime. :) The point is, as our museum acquires this more
                > serious collection, it costs money. A few months ago we had to rent a
                > box truck with a lift gate to get a "free" IBM System/38 from upstate
                > New York. Next week, Bill is going to rent another truck to get the
                > control station of our "free" Burroughs L-7000. In many other cases,
                > individual members such as me, Joe G., David G., and a bunch of others
                > all contributed time and fuel using their own vehicles, solely to help
                > MARCH build its collection.
                >
                > Finally, there's the topic of MARCH member dues: we don't charge any!
                > Andy and I formed the group just for kicks and grins in summer/fall of
                > 2004. We never fathomed that it would became what it is now. Even if
                > we knew it would succeed, we definitely didn't want to deal with running
                > a formal entity. We just wanted to meet people and tinker on
                > computers. So, MARCH membership was, is, and shall always remain
                > open-source.
                >
                > All we ask is this: if you use it and you like it, then please help pay
                > for it.
                >
                > Please go on over to http://www.midatlanticretro.org and click the
                > orange "Make a donation" icon in the top left corner.
                >
                > Any amount, from one buck to serious endowments, is equally appreciated.
                >
                > If someone were to ask me for a "suggested" amount, then I'd say that
                > anywhere from $20 to $50 is reasonable for an employed adult techie.
                >
                > If you can't afford to give this year, we understand. Personally I was
                > unemployed from the middle of January until a few weeks ago, and yes, I
                > struggled. So do not feel guilty if you can't help us raise money.
                >
                > If you CAN afford to help us, and if you can afford to be more generous
                > than the suggested amounts, then feel free to email me in private at
                > evan@.... For amounts of $100 and up, we can discuss situations
                > where InfoAge can provide 501c3 tax receipts, with the donation going
                > toward MARCH.
                >
                > Speaking of which: currently we're a not-for-profit company in the State
                > of New Jersey, however, Justin is working on making us a direct 501c3.
                > That way we don't have to work through InfoAge to get tax receipts,
                > etc., but it will take several months, maybe more, before this process
                > is finished.
                >
                > Currently the club officers are:
                > Me (Evan Koblentz) - president
                > Andy Meyer / Bill Degnan - vice presidents
                > Jim Scheef - outgoing treasurer
                > Justin Jernigan - incoming treasurer
                >
                > Thanks again to everyone for MARCH's kick-ass 2009, and thank you all in
                > advance for helping us do even better in 2010. My ears are ** ALWAYS **
                > open for suggestions about how the club can improve, so email me
                > anytime, or call me any evening at (646) 546-9999.
                >
                > - Evan
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
              • Brian Schenkenberger, VAXman-
                ... http://www.flickr.com/photos/centavo/2355685841/ -- VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM Well my son, life is like
                Message 7 of 7 , Dec 15, 2009
                • 0 Attachment
                  Evan Koblentz <evan@...> writes:

                  >bump

                  http://www.flickr.com/photos/centavo/2355685841/

                  --
                  VAXman- A Bored Certified VMS Kernel Mode Hacker VAXman(at)TMESIS(dot)COM

                  "Well my son, life is like a beanstalk, isn't it?"
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