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Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: IBM Computer Identification

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  • Sridhar Ayengar
    ... IDE interfaces for MCA machines are *extremely* rare. And if it is indeed one, I would pay a tidy sum of money for it. I would very much doubt that it is
    Message 1 of 56 , Oct 5, 2005
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      chrism3667 wrote:
      >>Thanks a lot for that. Now where can I get the drives for this thing?
      >>There is a connector on the motherboard that looks like a standard
      >
      > IDE,
      >
      >>but I doubt it. Also, what kind of RAM does it take? There are
      >
      > several
      >
      >>slots on the mainboard that look like they held SIMMs, but not sure.
      >>Thanks a lot.
      >
      >
      > It's probably exactly that Joe, and IDE connector. The IDE interface
      > bacame popular sometime during the original PC/AT's reign, but required
      > a board to use it on those. You might not have too much success

      IDE interfaces for MCA machines are *extremely* rare. And if it is
      indeed one, I would pay a tidy sum of money for it. I would very much
      doubt that it is an IDE interface. The only MCA IDE controller I've
      ever heard of is made by Arco Electronics, and is marked as such.

      MCA machines tend to have MFM, RLL, ESDI or SCSI.

      > Not sure about the ram sticks. Probably simms, though early ones, and
      > possibly even proprietary. The model 25 had proprietary ram sticks is
      > my understanding.

      Actually, the Model 25 was one of the few PS/2's that didn't use
      proprietary RAM. Just the detect pins needed to be connected. The
      Model 25 also wasn't a 286, unless it was marked that way. The original
      Model 25 was 8-bit ISA and had an 8088.

      > Personally I don't recommend putting any kind of money or serious
      > effort into a PS/2. Have some fun though by all means. A kewell find is

      Why not? Some models are *completely* indestructable. I used four
      8580's (Model 80-386's) to hold up a Jeep CJ7. The machines were
      running at the time. I'll see if I can dig up the picture.

      > a kewell find. There's always something to be learned. I like the Model
      > 25's though. The earlier peecees are more kewell, and truly vintage ;).
      > I could probably find you something cheap at my "friend's" house in a
      > couple of weeks if you're interested. Even if it wasn't true blue (and
      > he's got those I believe) it's still older and more kewell.

      The Mod 25 was possibly the crappiest machine in the whole line.

      If you want a truly vintage PS/2, get a Model 50. 16-bit MCA and a
      10MHz 286. Anything with a Model number less than 50 was 8-bit ISA.
      Much more "commodity".

      I still use two Model 95's on a daily basis to do real work.

      Peace... Sridhar
    • Timothy J Fagan
      FWIW... I think this entire discussion shouldn t have been handled on the list at all. But that s just my take. From: Evan Koblentz Sent: Sunday, February 15,
      Message 56 of 56 , Feb 15 7:17 AM
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        FWIW... I think this entire discussion shouldn't have been handled on the list at all.
         
        But that's just my take.
         
         

        Sent: Sunday, February 15, 2009 10:08 AM
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] List

        I'll say this in public: I should have agreed with Andy four years ago when he argued for a list that we control instead of using Yahoo.

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