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Re: Rare Commodore Plus/4 1984 Olympic Edition

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  • chrism3667
    If there was any reason not to implement a solution using FPGA s or whatever, you could build a big board ;) and run a cable inside the puter. For some designs
    Message 1 of 27 , Sep 30, 2005
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      If there was any reason not to implement a solution using FPGA's or
      whatever, you could build a big board ;) and run a cable inside the
      puter. For some designs I suppose a hand trolley would be in order
      YUCK YUCK YUCK

      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Applegate" <bob@a...>
      wrote:
      > An easier approach, assuming there is room, is to build the device
      you want on a
      > daughterboard that simply plugs into the original socket. That way
      you can do the
      > new logic anyway you want, but it's still "pin compatible" with the
      device it's replacing.
      > This was very common, especially in the 70s and 80s. All kinds of
      changes to
      > commercial products were done that way.
      >
      > Of course, this assumes you've got the room for the new PC board
      floating above
      > the existing circuitry. In a tight area, this might not be true.
      >
      > Bob
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Jim Scheef
      > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, September 30, 2005 12:42 PM
      > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Rare Commodore Plus/4 1984
      Olympic Edition
      >
      >
      > Bob, Bill, all,
      >
      > My extreemly limited experience in this vein involves EPROMs to
      replace ROMs
      > in the HP Portable Plus. The problem was the pin configuration of
      the EPROMs.
      > We needed 128K (1M bit) EPROMs to add custom software to the 'ROM
      Drawer' of
      > the PPlus. There were plenty of such chips but they all had two
      pins too many
      > (one extra on each side). Finally someone found a 128K EPROM with
      the right
      > pins and we were off to the races.
      >
      > To replace the proprietary chips in anything you need both the
      same
      > functionality and the same pin configuration. Each pin must have
      the same
      > signal as the original chip.
      >
      > Isn't what these chips did now called digital signal processing?
      >
      > Jim
      >
      > --- Bob Applegate <bob@a...> wrote:
      >
      > > I don't know anything about the TED chip, but if you want to
      emulate it
      > > with an
      > > FPGA, it's very easy to toss in one or more soft-core
      processors. There
      > > are
      > > numerous free IP processor cores out there, as well as some
      very pricey
      > > proprietary ones. Altera and Xilinx (the main FPGA players)
      both "give
      > > away"
      > > their cores. We explored doing this for some projects, but the
      processors
      > > weren't powerful enough to move the quantity of data we needed.
      > >
      > > I'm not aware of any FPGAs with DACs in them, but explore the
      > > manufacturer's
      > > web sites to see if you can find something.
      > >
      > > Bob
      > >
      > > -------------------------------------------------
      > > Bob Applegate
      > > Senior Software Engineer
      > > Embedded Development Group
      > > Ulticom, Inc
      > > 856-787-2761
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: billdeg@a...
      > > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2005 12:24 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Rare Commodore Plus/4
      1984 Olympic
      > > Edition
      > >
      > >
      > > I believe that the TED chip does more than just what you're
      asking the
      > > FPGA
      > > to do, the TED is the processor as well. Or maybe I am
      missing your
      > > point.
      > > There is no replacement, but I do know that these chips had
      markings on
      > > them
      > > other than 8501R1, I think that there is a 7501R1 as well,
      but it's still
      > > a TED
      > > chip, just an earlier version. I'd have to look on the web
      for more
      > > info.
      > > Bill
      > >
      > > In a message dated 9/29/2005 10:02:21 AM Eastern Standard
      Time,
      > > relayer@y... writes:
      > >
      > > > Does anybody know if is even remotely plausable to replace
      the
      > > > increasingly rare TED chip with a FPGA that was programmed
      with the
      > > > same functionality? Do FPGA's have analog outputs?
      > > >
      > > > I know this is a far reaching concept. I'm working with
      PICs right now
      > > > as I move my way to tackling FPGA architecture. PICs have
      analog I/O
      > > > that has been used to create NTSC output. I don't see
      where an FPGA
      > > > with analog I/O couldn't generate an NTSC or PAL output to
      simulate
      > > > TED output.
      > >
      > >
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    • Jim Scheef
      Message 2 of 27 , Sep 30, 2005
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        <strong chuckle>

        --- Evan <evan947@...> wrote:

        > Vintro.
        >
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