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Re: Rare Commodore Plus/4 1984 Olympic Edition

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  • chrism3667
    If there was any reason not to implement a solution using FPGA s or whatever, you could build a big board ;) and run a cable inside the puter. For some designs
    Message 1 of 27 , Sep 30, 2005
      If there was any reason not to implement a solution using FPGA's or
      whatever, you could build a big board ;) and run a cable inside the
      puter. For some designs I suppose a hand trolley would be in order
      YUCK YUCK YUCK

      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Applegate" <bob@a...>
      wrote:
      > An easier approach, assuming there is room, is to build the device
      you want on a
      > daughterboard that simply plugs into the original socket. That way
      you can do the
      > new logic anyway you want, but it's still "pin compatible" with the
      device it's replacing.
      > This was very common, especially in the 70s and 80s. All kinds of
      changes to
      > commercial products were done that way.
      >
      > Of course, this assumes you've got the room for the new PC board
      floating above
      > the existing circuitry. In a tight area, this might not be true.
      >
      > Bob
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Jim Scheef
      > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Friday, September 30, 2005 12:42 PM
      > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Rare Commodore Plus/4 1984
      Olympic Edition
      >
      >
      > Bob, Bill, all,
      >
      > My extreemly limited experience in this vein involves EPROMs to
      replace ROMs
      > in the HP Portable Plus. The problem was the pin configuration of
      the EPROMs.
      > We needed 128K (1M bit) EPROMs to add custom software to the 'ROM
      Drawer' of
      > the PPlus. There were plenty of such chips but they all had two
      pins too many
      > (one extra on each side). Finally someone found a 128K EPROM with
      the right
      > pins and we were off to the races.
      >
      > To replace the proprietary chips in anything you need both the
      same
      > functionality and the same pin configuration. Each pin must have
      the same
      > signal as the original chip.
      >
      > Isn't what these chips did now called digital signal processing?
      >
      > Jim
      >
      > --- Bob Applegate <bob@a...> wrote:
      >
      > > I don't know anything about the TED chip, but if you want to
      emulate it
      > > with an
      > > FPGA, it's very easy to toss in one or more soft-core
      processors. There
      > > are
      > > numerous free IP processor cores out there, as well as some
      very pricey
      > > proprietary ones. Altera and Xilinx (the main FPGA players)
      both "give
      > > away"
      > > their cores. We explored doing this for some projects, but the
      processors
      > > weren't powerful enough to move the quantity of data we needed.
      > >
      > > I'm not aware of any FPGAs with DACs in them, but explore the
      > > manufacturer's
      > > web sites to see if you can find something.
      > >
      > > Bob
      > >
      > > -------------------------------------------------
      > > Bob Applegate
      > > Senior Software Engineer
      > > Embedded Development Group
      > > Ulticom, Inc
      > > 856-787-2761
      > >
      > > ----- Original Message -----
      > > From: billdeg@a...
      > > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > > Sent: Thursday, September 29, 2005 12:24 PM
      > > Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Rare Commodore Plus/4
      1984 Olympic
      > > Edition
      > >
      > >
      > > I believe that the TED chip does more than just what you're
      asking the
      > > FPGA
      > > to do, the TED is the processor as well. Or maybe I am
      missing your
      > > point.
      > > There is no replacement, but I do know that these chips had
      markings on
      > > them
      > > other than 8501R1, I think that there is a 7501R1 as well,
      but it's still
      > > a TED
      > > chip, just an earlier version. I'd have to look on the web
      for more
      > > info.
      > > Bill
      > >
      > > In a message dated 9/29/2005 10:02:21 AM Eastern Standard
      Time,
      > > relayer@y... writes:
      > >
      > > > Does anybody know if is even remotely plausable to replace
      the
      > > > increasingly rare TED chip with a FPGA that was programmed
      with the
      > > > same functionality? Do FPGA's have analog outputs?
      > > >
      > > > I know this is a far reaching concept. I'm working with
      PICs right now
      > > > as I move my way to tackling FPGA architecture. PICs have
      analog I/O
      > > > that has been used to create NTSC output. I don't see
      where an FPGA
      > > > with analog I/O couldn't generate an NTSC or PAL output to
      simulate
      > > > TED output.
      > >
      > >
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    • billdeg@aol.com
      All of this may be true, but from a practical perspective and specifically for the Commodore Plus/4 I have never heard of anyone successfully reproducing the
      Message 2 of 27 , Sep 30, 2005
        All of this may be true, but from a practical perspective and specifically for the Commodore Plus/4 I have never heard of anyone successfully reproducing the TED chip.  If you have a dead TED, get another Plus/4 or C16 for $15.  It's not really worth the effort.
         
        My original point was that there is a commemorative Plus/4 out there, and that even if it's dead, you can replace the chip pretty easily by sacrificing a regular plus/4.
         
        Bill
         
         
        In a message dated 9/30/2005 1:25:51 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jscheef@... writes:
        Bob, Bill, all,

        My extreemly limited experience in this vein involves EPROMs to replace ROMs
        in the HP Portable Plus. The problem was the pin configuration of the EPROMs.
        We needed 128K (1M bit) EPROMs to add custom software to the 'ROM Drawer' of
        the PPlus. There were plenty of such chips but they all had two pins too many
        (one extra on each side). Finally someone found a 128K EPROM with the right
        pins and we were off to the races.

        To replace the proprietary chips in anything you need both the same
        functionality and the same pin configuration. Each pin must have the same
        signal as the original chip.

        Isn't what these chips did now called digital signal processing?

        Jim
         
      • Jim Scheef
        Message 3 of 27 , Sep 30, 2005
          <strong chuckle>

          --- Evan <evan947@...> wrote:

          > Vintro.
          >
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