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OT: Marconi book

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  • evan@snarc.net
    Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It s called, Signor Marconi s Magic Box, by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I learned much about
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 20, 2009
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      Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.

      For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, and really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and career.

      Anyway, it's a good book and very well written. Highly recommended.
    • mouse_059
      Something else I noticed - the wikipedia page on Marconi has exactly zero mention of his work at Fort Monmouth, and the Honors and Awards mentions him listed
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 21, 2009
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        Something else I noticed - the wikipedia page on Marconi has exactly zero mention of his work at Fort Monmouth, and the 'Honors and Awards' mentions him listed in the NJ hall of fame but doesn't provide any links to InfoAge. It probably should!

        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, evan@... wrote:
        >
        > Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.
        >
        > For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, and really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and career.
        >
        > Anyway, it's a good book and very well written. Highly recommended.
        >
      • evan@snarc.net
        Other than the historic meeting between Armstrong and Sarnoff (which is mentioned in the book but not in detail and doesn t cite the location), our facility
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 21, 2009
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          Other than the historic meeting between Armstrong and Sarnoff (which is mentioned in the book but not in detail and doesn't cite the location), our facility wasn't hugely important to Marconi the man. It was more important to the Marconi America company itself, by which point Marconi the man was a globe-trotting celebrity executive. We do believe he visited our campus at least once.


          -----Original Message-----
          From: "mouse_059" <mouse@...>

          Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2009 20:16:57
          To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
          Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: OT: Marconi book


          Something else I noticed - the wikipedia page on Marconi has exactly zero mention of his work at Fort Monmouth, and the 'Honors and Awards' mentions him listed in the NJ hall of fame but doesn't provide any links to InfoAge. It probably should!

          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, evan@... wrote:
          >
          > Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.
          >
          > For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, and really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and career.
          >
          > Anyway, it's a good book and very well written. Highly recommended.
          >




          ------------------------------------

          Yahoo! Groups Links
        • Jim Scheef
          Marconi stole a lot from Tesla and others. Some of his patents went all the way to the Supreme Court and are controversial to this day because of a decision
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 21, 2009
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            Marconi stole a lot from Tesla and others. Some of his patents went all
            the way to the Supreme Court and are controversial to this day because
            of a decision that reversed an earlier decision against Marconi. I've
            been reading a book called "The History of Wireless" in which Marconi is
            barely a chapter. He gets more credit than his due - like Edison in some
            ways but Edison (and his staff) actually invented more. DeForest should
            get more credit for making radio practical.

            OTOH, the book I'm reading made no mention of his political leanings.

            Jim

            evan@... wrote:
            >
            > Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor
            > Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I
            > learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.
            >
            > For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, and
            > really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and
            > career.
            >
            > Anyway, it's a good book and very well written. Highly recommended.
            >
            >
          • evan@snarc.net
            The major difference in Tesla s technology vs Marconi s is that Tesla (and others) used induction whereas Marconi used long Hertzian waves. ... From: Jim
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 21, 2009
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              The major difference in Tesla's technology vs Marconi's is that Tesla (and others) used induction whereas Marconi used long Hertzian waves.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Jim Scheef <scheefj@...>

              Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2009 17:49:29
              To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] OT: Marconi book


              Marconi stole a lot from Tesla and others. Some of his patents went all
              the way to the Supreme Court and are controversial to this day because
              of a decision that reversed an earlier decision against Marconi. I've
              been reading a book called "The History of Wireless" in which Marconi is
              barely a chapter. He gets more credit than his due - like Edison in some
              ways but Edison (and his staff) actually invented more. DeForest should
              get more credit for making radio practical.

              OTOH, the book I'm reading made no mention of his political leanings.

              Jim

              evan@... wrote:
              >
              > Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor
              > Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I
              > learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.
              >
              > For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, and
              > really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and
              > career.
              >
              > Anyway, it's a good book and very well written. Highly recommended.
              >
              >


              ------------------------------------

              Yahoo! Groups Links
            • Dan Roganti
              evan@snarc.net wrote: Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It s called, Signor Marconi s Magic Box, by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 21, 2009
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                evan@... wrote:
                Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.
                
                For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, 
                I sure hope the book wasn't as simplistic as these comments - I wouldn't waste my hard earned money on this book otherwise.

                Historians can been questioning how legitimate his political beliefs were, since this was under the reign of Mussolini. There were several scientists that had to put their scientific work ahead of whatever political ideals they were stuck within in order to avoid being ostracized by their government, for the advancement of science.

                "You had to go with the flow", even if it meant losing funding for your research, being kicked out on the street, or getting killed (Galileo) -- because that govt would still be there doing the same crap, even without you.  Just look at Wernher von Braun, he certainly didn't condone in the use of Jewish salved labor to build the Peenemunde rocket base.

                Just put yourself in their shoes and think what would you do, would you give up all your research because of some looney dictator, either Hitler or Mussolini. The scientific community weren't very strong in their defense of ideals.


                and really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and career.
                  
                I think this sounds like another opinionated statement from the author.

                =Dan
                -- 
                [ = http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/   ]


              • Jim Scheef
                Evan, That explains a lot. NJ is not mentioned in History of Wireless, either. Thanks! Has anyone figured out what the Marconi company did at Belmar? Jim
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 23, 2009
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                  Evan,

                  That explains a lot. NJ is not mentioned in History of Wireless, either.
                  Thanks! Has anyone figured out what the Marconi company did at Belmar?

                  Jim

                  evan@... wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > Other than the historic meeting between Armstrong and Sarnoff (which is
                  > mentioned in the book but not in detail and doesn't cite the location),
                  > our facility wasn't hugely important to Marconi the man. It was more
                  > important to the Marconi America company itself, by which point Marconi
                  > the man was a globe-trotting celebrity executive. We do believe he
                  > visited our campus at least once.
                  >
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: "mouse_059" <mouse@... <mailto:mouse%40whiskers.com>>
                  >
                  > Date: Tue, 21 Jul 2009 20:16:57
                  > To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                  > <mailto:midatlanticretro%40yahoogroups.com>>
                  > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: OT: Marconi book
                  >
                  >
                  > Something else I noticed - the wikipedia page on Marconi has exactly
                  > zero mention of his work at Fort Monmouth, and the 'Honors and Awards'
                  > mentions him listed in the NJ hall of fame but doesn't provide any links
                  > to InfoAge. It probably should!
                  >
                  > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                  > <mailto:midatlanticretro%40yahoogroups.com>, evan@... wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor
                  > Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I
                  > learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.
                  > >
                  > > For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite, and
                  > really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and
                  > career.
                  > >
                  > > Anyway, it's a good book and very well written. Highly recommended.
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • Evan Koblentz
                  ... Fred can go on for hours about that. :) But lots of information is here: http://infoage.org/html/history.html#Marconi
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 23, 2009
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                    >
                    > Has anyone figured out what the Marconi company did at Belmar?
                    >
                    Fred can go on for hours about that. :)

                    But lots of information is here:
                    http://infoage.org/html/history.html#Marconi
                  • Ray Sills
                    At the site of the New Brunswick Marconi station, there is a small public park, called Marconi Park . The site is located at the intersection of JFK Blvd
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 23, 2009
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                      At the site of the New Brunswick Marconi station, there is a small
                      public park, called "Marconi Park". The site is located at the
                      intersection of JFK Blvd and Easton Avenue (both are major roads in
                      the area) in the Somerset section of Franklin Twp.

                      The building that housed the transmitters was located on the northern
                      side of Easton Avenue, and feed lines were flown over the road to the
                      antenna area on the other side of the road (which is where the
                      current park is located). There's a nice diner located now on the
                      spot where the transmitter building once stood.


                      73 de Ray


                      On Jul 23, 2009, at 4:28 PM, Evan Koblentz wrote:

                      >>
                      >> Has anyone figured out what the Marconi company did at Belmar?
                      >>
                      > Fred can go on for hours about that. :)
                      >
                      > But lots of information is here:
                      > http://infoage.org/html/history.html#Marconi
                      >
                    • Bob Schwier
                      Two issues here. 1. There are times when we all make either or decisions based upon the time or place we are in. Marconi may have thought that Mussolini
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 23, 2009
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                        Two issues here.
                        1. There are times when we all make either or decisions based upon the
                        time or place we are in. Marconi may have thought that Mussolini would
                        be better than whatever he perceived the other choice as. In the
                        period in question, anti-Semitism was rampant and socially acceptable.
                        American intellectuals were seriously discussing eugenics as a justi-
                        fication for forced sterilization. This would be done in several states
                        in the Union.
                        Also, when he died, the bad bargain that fascism was was only becoming
                        apparent in Ethiopia and Spain. Mussolini was a thug to be sure but
                        he never displayed the savagery that Hitler had already demonstrated
                        before Marconi died.
                        2. Just because a person is a genius does not mean that he or she is
                        not an asshole. Think of Dr. Shockley who invented the transistor and
                        his trogolyte viewpoints on racial issues.
                        bs





                        --- On Tue, 7/21/09, Dan Roganti <ragooman@...> wrote:

                        From: Dan Roganti <ragooman@...>
                        Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] OT: Marconi book
                        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                        Date: Tuesday, July 21, 2009, 8:19 PM






                         













                        evan@... wrote:

                        Tonight I finished reading a book about Marconi. It's called, "Signor Marconi's Magic Box," by Gavin Weightman. This is the first time I learned much about Marconi beyond osmosis at Infoage.

                        For example, I didn't know he was a loner, fascist, anti-Semite,

                        I sure hope the book wasn't as simplistic as these comments - I
                        wouldn't waste my hard earned money on this book otherwise.



                        Historians can been questioning how legitimate his political beliefs
                        were, since this was under the reign of Mussolini. There were several
                        scientists that had to put their scientific work ahead of whatever
                        political ideals they were stuck within in order to avoid being
                        ostracized by their government, for the advancement of science.



                        "You had to go with the flow", even if it meant losing funding for your
                        research, being kicked out on the street, or getting killed (Galileo)
                        -- because that govt would still be there doing the same crap, even
                        without you.  Just look at Wernher von Braun, he certainly didn't
                        condone in the use of Jewish salved labor to build the Peenemunde
                        rocket base.



                        Just put yourself in their shoes and think what would you do, would you
                        give up all your research because of some looney dictator, either
                        Hitler or Mussolini. The scientific community weren't very strong in
                        their defense of ideals.






                        and really not very technical ... none of which lessens his inventions and career.


                        I think this sounds like another opinionated statement from the author.



                        =Dan

                        --
                        [ = http://www2. applegate. org/~ragooman/ ]
                      • Evan Koblentz
                        ... People tell me that a lot. :)
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 23, 2009
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                          >
                          > Just because a person is a genius does not mean that he or she is not an asshole
                          People tell me that a lot. :)
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