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RE: [midatlanticretro] Tandy Model 4 available for pickup

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  • Kelly D. Leavitt
    Jim: Thanks for picking this up. I was the one that pointed it out, but I have plenty of 4s. Do we need one for InfoAge? I think I have a mostly complete
    Message 1 of 17 , Jul 4, 2009
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      Jim:
        Thanks for picking this up. I was the one that pointed it out, but I have plenty of 4s. Do we need one for InfoAge?
       
      I think I have a mostly complete version of Netware 4 in the box here. Do you want it?
       
      Kelly
      -----Original Message-----
      From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Jim Scheef
      Sent: Saturday, July 04, 2009 1:31 PM
      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] Tandy Model 4 available for pickup

      Hello all,

      A couple of weeks ago there was a discussion about a Tandy Model 4
      available for pickup in Connecticut and several people moaned about how
      they could not get up there. Well, since I am "up here" I picked it up
      last Sunday. It is now in my garage, about 80 miles closer to InfoAge,
      and waiting for someone who wants it. I cannot find the original thread
      (it may have been off-list) so I do not know who wanted the computer.
      The donor said it works but I do not have the time to test it. The case
      appears to be in good condition, not yellowed with two floppies plus an
      external floppy in a metal enclosure and a genuine Tandy external modem.
      There is some software, mostly various operating systems (per donor).

      This computer could make a good first vintage machine for a new
      collector or help fill in an established collection or provide parts to
      improve a poor example of this model.

      Although a trade is not necessary, some things I'm looking for:

      * just about any LAN operating system, in particular Banyan Vines,
      3COM and any non-IBM versions of OS/2 LAN Manager including Microsoft.
      * EISA motherboards or complete EISA servers preferably .
      * physically small 286, 386 and 486 laptops.
      * DECconnect cables (phone cords with the funny tab off center) used
      to connect DEC terminals (any length).

      As you can see, I collect things many people here consider junk, so
      there must be a lot of this stuff in closets somewhere.

      Jim

    • msimonsmail
      ... I would like to hear more about your collections and interest. Particularly in your interest in EISA motherboards and computers. I am personally
      Message 2 of 17 , Jul 4, 2009
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        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Jim Scheef <scheefj@...> wrote:
        > * EISA motherboards or complete EISA servers preferably .
        > * physically small 286, 386 and 486 laptops.
        > As you can see, I collect things many people here consider junk, so
        > there must be a lot of this stuff in closets somewhere.

        I would like to hear more about your collections and interest. Particularly in your interest in EISA motherboards and computers.

        I am personally interested in hearing about people who collect (and USE) old 'commodity' pc type hardware... especially as there is so much of it.. and often as you said.. many people consider it 'junk' uninteresting.. or too old for use...

        I've personally seem some rather interesting pc mobos that I think are historically interesting for their quirky changes.. and am generally interested in finding homes for this stuff where it is appreciated and perhaps utilized in new and interesting ways, or in ways that contribute to development and testing, where possible.

        I am also interested in "physyically small .. laptops" as I am interested in mobile and wearable computing.

        thanks
        --
        MS
      • John S
        I collect and use old standard consumer hardware. I have about a dozen fully functional 386 and 486 boxes, and another dozen Pentium boxes. All are tested and
        Message 3 of 17 , Jul 4, 2009
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          I collect and use old standard consumer hardware. I have about a dozen fully functional 386 and 486 boxes, and another dozen Pentium boxes. All are tested and working, and a few are in more active use, being set up with Win3 and games, or DOS and games, internet access, and office apps, etc.. I especially like my 486 boxes with VESA, or a combination of VESA/ISA/PCI all in the same box. Quite a find that one was. :D

          On Sat, Jul 4, 2009 at 2:04 PM, msimonsmail <msimonsmail@...> wrote:


          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Jim Scheef <scheefj@...> wrote:
          > * EISA motherboards or complete EISA servers preferably .
          > * physically small 286, 386 and 486 laptops.
          > As you can see, I collect things many people here consider junk, so
          > there must be a lot of this stuff in closets somewhere.

          I would like to hear more about your collections and interest. Particularly in your interest in EISA motherboards and computers.

          I am personally interested in hearing about people who collect (and USE) old 'commodity' pc type hardware... especially as there is so much of it.. and often as you said.. many people consider it 'junk' uninteresting.. or too old for use...

          I've personally seem some rather interesting pc mobos that I think are historically interesting for their quirky changes.. and am generally interested in finding homes for this stuff where it is appreciated and perhaps utilized in new and interesting ways, or in ways that contribute to development and testing, where possible.

          I am also interested in "physyically small .. laptops" as I am interested in mobile and wearable computing.

          thanks
          --
          MS


        • Brian Cirulnick
          ... Jim; I don t know if anyone else has claimed that yet (I haven t gotten through the backlog of messages, and given my workload today, I may not get through
          Message 4 of 17 , Jul 6, 2009
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            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Jim Scheef <scheefj@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hello all,
            >
            > A couple of weeks ago there was a discussion about a Tandy Model 4
            > available for pickup in Connecticut and several people moaned about how
            > they could not get up there. Well, since I am "up here" I picked it up
            > last Sunday. It is now in my garage, about 80 miles closer to InfoAge,
            > and waiting for someone who wants it. I cannot find the original thread
            > (it may have been off-list) so I do not know who wanted the computer.
            > The donor said it works but I do not have the time to test it. The case
            > appears to be in good condition, not yellowed with two floppies plus an
            > external floppy in a metal enclosure and a genuine Tandy external modem.
            > There is some software, mostly various operating systems (per donor).
            >
            > This computer could make a good first vintage machine for a new
            > collector or help fill in an established collection or provide parts to
            > improve a poor example of this model.
            >
            > Although a trade is not necessary, some things I'm looking for:
            >
            > * just about any LAN operating system, in particular Banyan Vines,
            > 3COM and any non-IBM versions of OS/2 LAN Manager including Microsoft.
            > * EISA motherboards or complete EISA servers preferably .
            > * physically small 286, 386 and 486 laptops.
            > * DECconnect cables (phone cords with the funny tab off center) used
            > to connect DEC terminals (any length).
            >
            > As you can see, I collect things many people here consider junk, so
            > there must be a lot of this stuff in closets somewhere.
            >
            --------------------

            Jim;

            I don't know if anyone else has claimed that yet (I haven't gotten through the backlog of messages, and given my workload today, I may not get through the backlog of messages), but, I'm interested, and can trade a 386 or 486 laptop (I don't know if it's really physically small, it's about average size for a laptop, but it works)

            ttyl
          • Jim Scheef
            M Simon, First, do you have a first name? It s nice to be able to address people by name. My interest in EISA is purely tangential. I want to set up vintage
            Message 5 of 17 , Jul 6, 2009
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              M Simon,

              First, do you have a first name? It's nice to be able to address people
              by name.

              My interest in EISA is purely tangential. I want to set up vintage
              network operating systems and would like to do it on server hardware
              that matches the vintage of the OS. Plus, thanks to a MARCH member, I
              now have a bunch of EISA cards (SCSI and network). So I need some EISA
              motherboards with processors, RAM (and the setup disk) with suitable
              cases and working power supplies. The less time I spend getting a
              machine working, the more time I have to install a network and get it
              working. Somewhere down the road, one or more of these could become an
              exhibit at the museum so a case in good condition is a plus.

              Of course EISA machines were more expensive and thus are unusual, even
              almost rare. As the industry response to IBM's PS/2 machines, they are
              historical to a degree. The problem is that the technology is the
              historical part, not any one individual machine. Compaq, HP, DEC,
              Micronics and many others all produced EISA machines in one burst to
              extend the industry standard architecture, so there is not really a
              "first" that is more collectible than any other EISA machine. The added
              expense and the PCI bus soon made EISA superflous and thus more rare and
              more interesting.

              Jim


              msimonsmail wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
              > <mailto:midatlanticretro%40yahoogroups.com>, Jim Scheef <scheefj@...> wrote:
              > > * EISA motherboards or complete EISA servers preferably .
              > > * physically small 286, 386 and 486 laptops.
              > > As you can see, I collect things many people here consider junk, so
              > > there must be a lot of this stuff in closets somewhere.
              >
              > I would like to hear more about your collections and interest.
              > Particularly in your interest in EISA motherboards and computers.
              >
              > I am personally interested in hearing about people who collect (and USE)
              > old 'commodity' pc type hardware... especially as there is so much of
              > it.. and often as you said.. many people consider it 'junk'
              > uninteresting.. or too old for use...
              >
              > I've personally seem some rather interesting pc mobos that I think are
              > historically interesting for their quirky changes.. and am generally
              > interested in finding homes for this stuff where it is appreciated and
              > perhaps utilized in new and interesting ways, or in ways that contribute
              > to development and testing, where possible.
              >
              > I am also interested in "physyically small .. laptops" as I am
              > interested in mobile and wearable computing.
              >
              > thanks
              > --
              > MS
              >
            • Evan Koblentz
              ... He (Michael) sent an intro email on April 8, 2005.
              Message 6 of 17 , Jul 6, 2009
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                >
                > M Simon,
                >
                > First, do you have a first name?
                >
                He (Michael) sent an intro email on April 8, 2005.
              • Jim Scheef
                Hello all, Brian Cirulnick picked up this machine today so it s on its way to a nice home. Jim
                Message 7 of 17 , Jul 12, 2009
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                  Hello all,

                  Brian Cirulnick picked up this machine today so it's on its way to a
                  nice home.

                  Jim

                  Jim Scheef wrote:
                  >
                  > the
                  >
                  > Hello all,
                  >
                  > A couple of weeks ago there was a discussion about a Tandy Model 4
                  > available for pickup in Connecticut and several people moaned about how
                  > they could not get up there. Well, since I am "up here" I picked it up
                  > last Sunday. It is now in my garage, about 80 miles closer to InfoAge,
                  > and waiting for someone who wants it. I cannot find the original thread
                  > (it may have been off-list) so I do not know who wanted the computer.
                  > The donor said it works but I do not have the time to test it. The case
                  > appears to be in good condition, not yellowed with two floppies plus an
                  > external floppy in a metal enclosure and a genuine Tandy external modem.
                  > There is some software, mostly various operating systems (per donor).
                  >
                  > This computer could make a good first vintage machine for a new
                  > collector or help fill in an established collection or provide parts to
                  > improve a poor example of this model.
                  >
                  > Although a trade is not necessary, some things I'm looking for:
                  >
                  > * just about any LAN operating system, in particular Banyan Vines,
                  > 3COM and any non-IBM versions of OS/2 LAN Manager including Microsoft.
                  > * EISA motherboards or complete EISA servers preferably .
                  > * physically small 286, 386 and 486 laptops.
                  > * DECconnect cables (phone cords with the funny tab off center) used
                  > to connect DEC terminals (any length).
                  >
                  > As you can see, I collect things many people here consider junk, so
                  > there must be a lot of this stuff in closets somewhere.
                  >
                  > Jim
                  >
                  >
                • Brian Cirulnick
                  ... And it s very nice!!! Thanks again! Also, Jim provided me with some DEC documentation that needs to go to Infoage -- Evan, we ll need to arrange a
                  Message 8 of 17 , Jul 13, 2009
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                    --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Jim Scheef <scheefj@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hello all,
                    >
                    > Brian Cirulnick picked up this machine today so it's on its way to a
                    > nice home.
                    >
                    -------------

                    And it's very nice!!! Thanks again!

                    Also, Jim provided me with some DEC documentation that needs to go to Infoage -- Evan, we'll need to arrange a date/time for another rendevous at Short Hills Mall to xfer it to the Miata.

                    And in other news... I may have found something at SCARC Hamfest worth showing at VCF... An Epson QX-10, but I need to find a full copy of the original ValDocs software for it (otherwise it's not worth showing).

                    The one disk I have is a butchered copy of TMS. I found two disk images online, hopefully they will work, just need to set up my dos-box with 5.25 drive to make the disk images. (Hopefully, will find the time this week for that)...
                  • Kelly D. Leavitt
                    ... Hey, you should have stopped by the food area and asked for me. I d have brought you lunch or at least a drink. Glad the QX-10 went to a good home. Kelly
                    Message 9 of 17 , Jul 13, 2009
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                      > And in other news... I may have found something at
                      > SCARC Hamfest worth showing at VCF... An Epson
                      > QX-10, but I need to find a full copy of the
                      > original ValDocs software for it (otherwise it's
                      > not worth showing).
                      Hey, you should have stopped by the food area and asked for me. I'd have brought you lunch or at least a drink. Glad the QX-10 went to a good home.

                      Kelly
                    • evan@snarc.net
                      ... NJARC guys said they enjoyed it too.
                      Message 10 of 17 , Jul 13, 2009
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                        >>> at SCARC Hamfest

                        NJARC guys said they enjoyed it too.
                      • B Degnan
                        ... This would be an excellent exhibit for VCF. The QX-10 was part of the first serious waves of Japanese imports into the US market, just before the IBM PC
                        Message 11 of 17 , Jul 13, 2009
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                          >
                          > And in other news... I may have found something at SCARC Hamfest worth showing at VCF... An Epson QX-10, but I need to find a full copy of the original ValDocs software for it (otherwise it's not worth showing).
                          >
                          > The one disk I have is a butchered copy of TMS. I found two disk images online, hopefully they will work, just need to set up my dos-box with 5.25 drive to make the disk images. (Hopefully, will find the time this week for that)...
                          >
                          >
                          This would be an excellent exhibit for VCF. The QX-10 was part of the
                          first serious waves of Japanese imports into the US market, just before
                          the IBM PC IIRC. The Epson QX-10 may appear on the cover of an issue of
                          Byte...At the least the QX-10 will appear as part of an article about
                          early Japanese computers. No one to my knowledge has done an exhibit
                          about Epson's contribution to microcomputing history, plus the Epson
                          MX-80 printer was very popular, and was often sold with IBM PC's. It's
                          something worth covering.
                        • Brian Cirulnick
                          ... The Valdocs software that it shipped with is also worthy of note: It s one of the first integrated software suites, providing word processing, spreadsheet,
                          Message 12 of 17 , Jul 14, 2009
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                            --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, B Degnan <billdeg@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            > >
                            > > And in other news... I may have found something at SCARC Hamfest worth showing at VCF... An Epson QX-10, but I need to find a full copy of the original ValDocs software for it (otherwise it's not worth showing).
                            > >
                            > >
                            > This would be an excellent exhibit for VCF. The QX-10 was part of the
                            > first serious waves of Japanese imports into the US market, just before
                            > the IBM PC IIRC. The Epson QX-10 may appear on the cover of an issue of
                            > Byte...At the least the QX-10 will appear as part of an article about
                            > early Japanese computers. No one to my knowledge has done an exhibit
                            > about Epson's contribution to microcomputing history, plus the Epson
                            > MX-80 printer was very popular, and was often sold with IBM PC's. It's
                            > something worth covering.
                            >

                            The Valdocs software that it shipped with is also worthy of note: It's one of the first integrated software suites, providing word processing, spreadsheet, drawing program, and even some kind of email functionality all in one package (before MS came up with "Works", and possibly even before Lotus 123).

                            Furthermore, the Word Processor was WYSIWYG, showing on-screen italics and bold, possible only because the monitor was a higher resolution than most computers at the time (and higher than many computers that followed).

                            And, all that said, I still don't know if I can even *do* VCF this year due to scheduling conflicts (I can be there for Sunday, but Saturday is "iffy".)

                            I'm still trying to work out how to be at 3 corners of the globe simultaneously on the 12th... I need to clone myself.
                          • evan@snarc.net
                            ... The Philadelphia Hacktory exhibit is only for Saturday. So you can have their booth on Sunday if you want it. Although Sunday is usually much slower.
                            Message 13 of 17 , Jul 14, 2009
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                              >>> I can be there for Sunday, but Saturday is "iffy".

                              The Philadelphia Hacktory exhibit is only for Saturday. So you can have their booth on Sunday if you want it. Although Sunday is usually much slower.
                            • Dan Roganti
                              The QX-10 manuals can be found here. I found this while ago when I was looking up a graphics chip which this machine also has, uPD7220, it was one of the most
                              Message 14 of 17 , Jul 14, 2009
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                                The QX-10 manuals can be found here. I found this while ago when I was looking up a graphics chip which this machine also has, uPD7220, it was one of the most powerful graphics chips during it's time - this was pre-VGA era. It was even supported by CP/M using the GSX libraries. I'm hoping to build a S-100 card using this chip in the future. There's several Valdocs manuals on there that might help you and the BYTE article.
                                PDF documentation for the Epson QX-10 computer

                                =Dan
                                [ = http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/   ]

                              • Mr Ian Primus
                                Speaking of the QX-10, I have one, as well as it s associated monitor, but I don t have the keyboard. Anyone have a spare? -Ian
                                Message 15 of 17 , Jul 14, 2009
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                                  Speaking of the QX-10, I have one, as well as it's associated monitor, but I don't have the keyboard. Anyone have a spare?

                                  -Ian
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