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Automatic Gate Idea

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  • Bill Degnan
    I can t do this myself, but if I was going to make an automatic gate, given the fact that it swings open rather than slides...why not put a little motor on the
    Message 1 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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      I can't do this myself, but if I was going to make an automatic gate, given
      the fact that it swings open rather than slides...why not put a little
      motor on the wheels at the bottom of the gate, and program them upon
      receipt of a signal to run for a specified amount of time to open and close
      the door. There are already wheels on the gate so all you would have to do
      is attach a robot motor (somehow), send the "open" signal to the motor
      controller, the motor will spin the wheels to move the gate, and a timing
      circuit would turn off the motor after a 20 seconds or so, and stop. The
      motor would run in reverse to close.
      Bill
    • Evan Koblentz
      ... Personally I think it s better to convert it to a sliding gate. That way it won t smack into anyone s car. :)
      Message 2 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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        >
        > I can't do this myself, but if I was going to make an automatic gate, given
        > the fact that it swings open rather than slides...why not put a little
        > motor on the wheels at the bottom of the gate, and program them upon
        > receipt of a signal to run for a specified amount of time to open and close
        > the door. There are already wheels on the gate so all you would have to do
        > is attach a robot motor (somehow), send the "open" signal to the motor
        > controller, the motor will spin the wheels to move the gate, and a timing
        > circuit would turn off the motor after a 20 seconds or so, and stop. The
        > motor would run in reverse to close.
        > Bill
        >
        Personally I think it's better to convert it to a sliding gate. That
        way it won't smack into anyone's car. :)
      • Brian Cirulnick
        ... I think what Evan s looking for is not trivial. A sliding gate must be rigid, and then slide along a rail usually augmented with a pully/chain. The drive
        Message 3 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Personally I think it's better to convert it to a sliding gate. That
          > way it won't smack into anyone's car. :)
          >

          I think what Evan's looking for is not trivial. A sliding gate must be rigid, and then slide along a rail usually augmented with a pully/chain. The drive needs to be heavy duty because a rigid steel gate weighs a considerable amount.

          Ignoring the keypad input for a moment, there needs to be a sensor system in addition to a timer, so it doesn't close accidentally onto a car. Going back to the keypad for a second, there need to be identical pads on either side, so you can get in and then later out, and the pad placement needs to accomodate everything from Miatas to big trucks.

          I had one of these in the condo I had in Jersey City (but operated by a remote). Even with constant maintenance, the thing broke down regularly. It's an engineering nightmare to make one from scratch, you're actually better off trying to take up a collection to have something professionally installed.

          The first question above all: Is there a good source of electricity by this gate?
        • Evan Koblentz
          ... Yes.
          Message 4 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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            >>> Is there a good source of electricity by this gate?

            Yes.
          • Sridhar Ayengar
            ... Getting it to be reliable would be interesting. Peace... Sridhar
            Message 5 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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              Bill Degnan wrote:
              > I can't do this myself, but if I was going to make an automatic gate, given
              > the fact that it swings open rather than slides...why not put a little
              > motor on the wheels at the bottom of the gate, and program them upon
              > receipt of a signal to run for a specified amount of time to open and close
              > the door. There are already wheels on the gate so all you would have to do
              > is attach a robot motor (somehow), send the "open" signal to the motor
              > controller, the motor will spin the wheels to move the gate, and a timing
              > circuit would turn off the motor after a 20 seconds or so, and stop. The
              > motor would run in reverse to close.

              Getting it to be reliable would be interesting.

              Peace... Sridhar
            • Bill Degnan
              ... to do ... timing ... The ... I kind of like the danger aspect of this plan. A simple sensor would improve reliability. bd
              Message 6 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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                <snip>
                > > the door. There are already wheels on the gate so all you would have
                to do
                > > is attach a robot motor (somehow), send the "open" signal to the motor

                > > controller, the motor will spin the wheels to move the gate, and a
                timing
                > > circuit would turn off the motor after a 20 seconds or so, and stop.
                The
                > > motor would run in reverse to close.
                >
                > Getting it to be reliable would be interesting.
                >
                > Peace... Sridhar

                I kind of like the danger aspect of this plan. A simple sensor would
                improve reliability.
                bd
              • Sridhar Ayengar
                ... What I meant by reliability would be, how does one keep it from breaking down all the time? Peace... Sridhar
                Message 7 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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                  Bill Degnan wrote:
                  >>> the door. There are already wheels on the gate so all you would have
                  > to do
                  >>> is attach a robot motor (somehow), send the "open" signal to the motor
                  >
                  >>> controller, the motor will spin the wheels to move the gate, and a
                  > timing
                  >>> circuit would turn off the motor after a 20 seconds or so, and stop.
                  > The
                  >>> motor would run in reverse to close.
                  >> Getting it to be reliable would be interesting.
                  >
                  > I kind of like the danger aspect of this plan. A simple sensor would
                  > improve reliability.

                  What I meant by reliability would be, how does one keep it from breaking
                  down all the time?

                  Peace... Sridhar
                • Bill Degnan
                  ... Nothing I ever made has ever broken ever. lol
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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                    > >
                    > > I kind of like the danger aspect of this plan. A simple sensor would
                    > > improve reliability.
                    >
                    > What I meant by reliability would be, how does one keep it from breaking

                    > down all the time?
                    >

                    Nothing I ever made has ever broken ever. lol
                  • Sridhar Ayengar
                    ... Start building robots. You ll have stuff breaking all the time. Seriously. At IBM Microelectronics, we had spent millions of dollars (literally) to
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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                      Bill Degnan wrote:
                      >>> I kind of like the danger aspect of this plan. A simple sensor would
                      >>> improve reliability.
                      >> What I meant by reliability would be, how does one keep it from breaking
                      >
                      >> down all the time?
                      >>
                      >
                      > Nothing I ever made has ever broken ever. lol

                      Start building robots. You'll have stuff breaking all the time.
                      Seriously. At IBM Microelectronics, we had spent millions of dollars
                      (literally) to upgrade our parts and design to increase durability.
                      Doing it for a shoestring on a device that takes that much load will be
                      *interesting*.

                      Parts that are subject to lots of load and mechanical wear will break
                      down eventually. Period.

                      Peace... Sridhar
                    • Brian Cirulnick
                      ... That s not the only issue. The things needs to be 100% waterproof, (exposed to the elements, that s unlikely) and secondly exposed components will rust,
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 28, 2009
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                        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Sridhar Ayengar <ploopster@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Parts that are subject to lots of load and mechanical wear will break
                        > down eventually. Period.

                        ------------------

                        That's not the only issue. The things needs to be 100% waterproof, (exposed to the elements, that's unlikely) and secondly exposed components will rust, wear, and break. The wheel the gate will roll on will wear, if the roller it's on has any resistance, the wheel will develop a flat spot from drag,.. I mean, the list goes on. And that's not counting people fiddling with it.

                        Plus we would need to design the thing to be easily serviceable. You're talking metal fabrication on a pretty decent scale, this isn't something you build on a perf board and a plastic box from Radio Shack.
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