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Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: look for early 19+ NEC Multisync or equivalent

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  • Jim Scheef
    Chris, I plugged Sony Trinitron #GDM-1952 into Yahoo search. Check out http://www.avernus.com/~gadams/hardware/monitors.html and
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 19, 2005
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      Chris,

      I plugged "Sony Trinitron #GDM-1952" into Yahoo search. Check out

      http://www.avernus.com/~gadams/hardware/monitors.html

      and

      http://www.monitorworld.com/Monitors/supermac/std945519trinitrondisplay.html

      With a vertical frequency of only 60Hz, this monitor will have some flicker,
      but it certainly qualifies as vintage (1989) in my book. I'm not sure how the
      horizontal frequency translates to screen resolution.

      If you have a display adapter that supports the frequencies (just about
      anything made in the last 10 years) you can run this monitor under Linux
      using the manual setup for X-Windows. A PC can play nice with a fixed
      frequency monitor but it greatly limits your choices. You know, it might be
      easier to use it on an old Sun workstation.

      Jim

      --- Chris M <chrism3667@...> wrote:

      > I'm not quite sure what a 1952 is, probably just a
      > minor variant of the 1950. Sounds like fixed frequency
      > dude, there I'll have to pass :(. Tanks for the offer
      > though.
      > Some of those older monitors still kick butt though.
      > Don't be in a hurry to chuck it. If you can find a
      > solitary spot in the garage or basement, set it there
      > and one day you'll go looking for it. I still have 54
      > or 6 lying around :D.
      >
      > --- macmothership <macmothership@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Hey Chris.
      > > It is a 19" 1987 Sony Trinitron #GDM-1952 with the
      > > three seperate RGB
      > > input connectors. I
      > > have a cable that merges them into ine plug.
      > >
      > > -Jim
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Chris M
      > > <chrism3667@y...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > > <macmothership@y...> wrote:
      > > > > > I have a big 'ole monitor that I'm not using,
      > > 19"
      > > > > or
      > > > > 21" if I remember.
      > > >
      > > > Dude...if you get a chance, send me the
      > > make/model #.
      > > > Like I said, it's probably a fixed frequency
      > > monitor,
      > > > that work perfectly well with a Mac, but not very
      > > well
      > > > with a PC. But who knows.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > __________________________________
      > > > Yahoo! Mail - PC Magazine Editors' Choice 2005
      > > > http://mail.yahoo.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
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    • Chris M
      ... Dude, first of all...THANKS! :). Let me see how does it work.... Basically, multiply the vertical sychronization scanning frequency by the resolution and
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 19, 2005
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        --- Jim Scheef <jscheef@...> wrote:

        > I'm not sure how the
        > horizontal frequency translates to screen
        > resolution.

        Dude, first of all...THANKS! :). Let me see how does
        it work....
        Basically, multiply the vertical sychronization
        scanning frequency by the resolution and that's
        roughly the horizontal sync scan rate (you have to
        allow for overscan though, those "lines" of resolution
        you don't get to play with or generally even see).
        Take for instance my Tandy 2000. 640 x 400 @ 60hz.
        400 x 60 = 24,000 or 24khz. The card actually outputs
        25.something, because there's extra "lines" there. In
        TV broadcasts, I think the overscan can actually carry
        information, perhaps even closed captioned stuff and
        whatnot.

        > If you have a display adapter that supports the
        > frequencies (just about
        > anything made in the last 10 years) you can run this
        > monitor under Linux
        > using the manual setup for X-Windows. A PC can play
        > nice with a fixed
        > frequency monitor but it greatly limits your
        > choices. You know, it might be
        > easier to use it on an old Sun workstation.

        PC's can work with this style of monitor, but it used
        to require a special card, or a highly tweaked off the
        shelf video card. I'm going back to the mid 90's now
        when these things were plentiful. They readily plug up
        to Macs and as you pointed out, Suns and SGI's too.
        Every now and again you have a problem though. I once
        sold, perhaps the very model Jim has, to a guy who
        wanted to use it with his whatever PowerMac. For some
        reason though, it wouldn't sync up properly with his
        puter. Not positive what the reason was, but it may
        have had something to do with the width of the sync
        pulses. It worked fine with my IICX and E-machines
        Futura video card. The polarity of the sync pulses
        didn't have anything to do with it, all those monitors
        basically used negative going pulses.
        Back in the earlyish 90's, a guy in Derry, NH came
        out with a manual called "the Cheap VGA" book, which
        described how to get these monitors to work with a pc.
        There were all sorts of little tweaks you could
        employ, but sometimes you actually had to build a
        little circuit to accomplish the task. But even if you
        did get a monitor to work at a specific resolution, as
        soon as say a game changed it, you were shirt out of
        luck. Those were fun days. I used to find these things
        dirt cheap and sell them for buckeroos LOL LOL.




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      • Chris M
        http://www.parse.com/~ddunfield/museum/index.html __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 19, 2005
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          http://www.parse.com/~ddunfield/museum/index.html

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